Undergraduate Research

At RIT, undergraduate research means you will conduct research assignments that your peers at other universities often don’t see until graduate school. By providing undergraduates the opportunity to do genuine research work, students learn hands-on skills that become the foundation of scientific research.

Undergraduate Research Symposium

The free, public event showcases research and creative projects undertaken during the past year by undergraduate students in all colleges and institutes on campus. All RIT undergraduate students are eligible and encouraged to participate.

Research Experiences for Undergraduate Students

Throughout the 10-week program, undergraduate students from around the country work with RIT faculty to complete a research project in their respective areas. The Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program, supported through the National Science Foundation, aims to help a diverse group of students develop a passion for performing research. RIT offers seven programs:

Latest News

  • November 18, 2019

    'Two researchers wearing cleansuits work on detector equipment.'

    Researchers prepare rocket for launch

    A team of RIT researchers is helping launch an experiment above the atmosphere to better understand extragalactic background light, which traces the history of galaxies back to the formation of the first stars in the universe.

  • November 8, 2019

    'logo for ELM Enhanced Lifestyles for metabolic syndrome'

    RIT conducts clinical trial on metabolic syndrome

    RIT is seeking individuals diagnosed with metabolic syndrome to participate in a national clinical trial. The study will evaluate a wellness program designed to reverse conditions leading to heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and stroke.

  • November 8, 2019

    'Simulation of an accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole.'

    New study suggests ‘Pac-Man-like’ mergers could explain massive, spinning black holes

    Scientists have reported detecting gravitational waves from 10 black hole mergers to date, but they are still trying to explain the origins of those mergers. The largest merger detected so far seems to have defied previous models because it has a higher spin and mass than the range thought possible. A group of researchers, including RIT Assistant Professor Richard O’Shaughnessy, has created simulations that could explain how the merger happened.