Robotics and Manufacturing Engineering Technology Bachelor of Science Degree

RIT’s degree in robotics engineering prepares you for careers in today’s advanced manufacturing environments, where innovations in robotics and automation are changing the industry.


83%

Outcome Rate of RIT Graduates

$79K

Median First-Year Salary of RIT Graduates

$19.10

Average hourly co-op wage

4

Required Co-op Blocks

Gain career exposure and hands-on experience in full-time paid positions in a range of engineering organizations

1

Accelerated BS/MS Option

Maximize time, tuition, and competitive advantage by earning a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree in an accelerated program.

Overview

  • Four required blocks of co-op mean nearly a year of hands-on, full-time paid work experience in industry.
  • Companies hiring our students for co-ops include BAE Systems, Century Mold Co., Collins Aerospace, G.W. Lisk, General Dynamics Mission Systems, ITT Corp, Ortho Clinical Diagnotics, Parker Hannifin Corporation, and Thermo Fisher Scientific
  • Choose from eight technical concentrations in design and assembly modeling, design for manufacture and assembly, data acquisition and instrumentation, electronics packaging, quality control, Lean Six Sigma, manufacturing management, or plastics processing.

Innovations in industrial automation and manufacturing robotics are creating an increased demand for highly skilled robotics and manufacturing engineers. RIT’s robotics and manufacturing engineering technology major prepares you to become an engineer well-versed in advanced manufacturing technologies. Right now, the demand for robotics engineers, manufacturing engineers, and those skilled in designing and integrating automation into manufacturing processes is outweighing the number of students graduating with degrees in robotics engineering, resulting in outstanding employment opportunities for our graduates.

Robotics in the Manufacturing Industry

The future of robotics in manufacturing has arrived. Today’s manufacturing industry has evolved and its focus is now on advanced manufacturing, which emphasizes:

  • automation and advanced robotics to increase productivity and execute the precise maneuvers required to assemble small electronic parts.
  • big data and cloud computing to help manufacturers track and analyze trends and statistics, monitor productivity, and engage in data-supported decision-making.
  • 3D printing to decrease waste and improve output, and to reduce time needed for replacement parts.
  • artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things, which connects machines and devices and revolutionizes the way machines communicate and function.
  • augmented reality to create visual designs and simulations.

To meet the needs of the evolving manufacturing industry, RIT’s degree in robotics engineering focuses on preparing you to lead in this dynamic, ever-changing industry.

Robotics Engineering Courses

Students in the robotics and manufacturing engineering technology degree acquire skills in a wide variety of disciplines, including course work in automation and robotics, electronics manufacturing, mechatronics, advanced manufacturing processes, and integrated design. The degree’s comprehensive curriculum also includes traditional and non-traditional manufacturing processes, materials technology, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, controls for manufacturing automation, microprocessors, electrical and electronics principles, surface mount electronics manufacturing, quality control, lean manufacturing, engineering economics, and production and operations management. The uniqueness of this program is its combination of robotics and manufacturing courses and its emphasis on project-based, hands-on education.

Adding a minor in a complementary area of study deepens your expertise in the core areas of robotics manufacturing and broadens your skillset for a career in this dynamic field. These minors enhance the robotics and manufacturing engineering technology program:

Engineering vs. Engineering Technology 

Two dynamic areas of study, both with outstanding outcomes rates. Which do you choose?

What’s the difference between engineering and engineering technology? It’s a question we’re asked all the time. While there are subtle differences in the course work between the two, choosing a major in engineering vs. engineering technology is more about identifying what you like to do and how you like to do it.

Combined Accelerated Pathways

This program has an accelerated bachelor’s/master’s available, one of RIT's Combined Accelerated Pathways, which enables you to earn two degrees in as little as five years.

Accelerated 4+1 MBA

An accelerated 4+1 MBA option is available to students enrolled in any of RIT’s undergraduate programs. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Pathways can help you prepare for your future faster by enabling you to earn both a bachelor’s and an MBA in as little as five years of study.

Activities and Professional Organizations

You’ll have opportunities to participate in regional and national design competitions such as the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) BAJA team, SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge team, Formula SAE Racing, Hot Wheelz (RIT's all female electric vehicle team) and RIT Electric Vehicle Team. Students are also encouraged to participate in the student chapters of professional societies such as the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), the Society of Woman Engineers (SWE), the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE), and Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

Careers and Cooperative Education

Typical Job Titles

Industrial Engineer Manufacturing Engineering Associate
Process Engineer Rotational Program in Manufacturing Leadership
STS Process Engineer

Salary and Career Information for Robotics and Manufacturing Engineering Technology BS

Cooperative Education

What’s different about RIT’s engineering education? It’s the opportunity to complete engineering co-ops and internships with top companies in every single industry. You’ll earn more than a degree. You’ll gain real-world career experience that sets you apart.

Cooperative education, or co-op for short, is full-time, paid work experience in your field of study. And it sets RIT graduates apart from their competitors. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries. RIT co-op is designed for your success.

Students in the robotics and manufacturing engineering technology program are required to complete four co-op blocks. This typically includes one spring, one fall, and two summer blocks. You'll alternate periods of full-time study with full-time paid work experience in your career field. In some circumstances, other forms of experiential education (e.g., study abroad, research, military service) may be used to fulfill part of the co-op requirement. Each student is assigned a co-op advisor to assist in identifying and applying to co-op opportunities.

Featured Work

Featured Profiles

Curriculum for Robotics and Manufacturing Engineering Technology BS

Robotics and Manufacturing Engineering Technology, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective: General Chemistry for Engineers
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 2, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-171
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Calculus A
This is the first course in a three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). This course includes a study of functions, continuity, and differentiability. The study of functions includes the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Limits of functions are used to study continuity and differentiability. The study of the derivative includes the definition, basic rules, and implicit differentiation. Applications of the derivative include optimization and related-rates problems. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-111 or C- or better in ((NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) and NMTH-220) or a math placement exam score greater than or equal to 50.) Lecture 5 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-172
General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Calculus B
This is the second course in three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). The course includes Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite integral. The techniques of integration include substitution and integration by parts. The applications of the definite integral include areas between curves, and the calculation of volume. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-171 or 1016-171T or 1016-281 or 1016-231 or equivalent course.) Lecture 5 (Fall, Spring).
3
MCET-101
Fundamentals of Engineering
Students will apply engineering problem solving methods used in industry to complete projects involving engineering topics such as mechanics, circuits, robotics, and thermodynamics. Software tools are used to model their designs, perform design calculations, collect and analyze data. Finally, students will present their work professionally using both written and oral communication software. The goal of the class is to have students become familiar with the many aspects of mechanical engineering through hands on, experiential learning and prepares them to work professionally and effectively in a team setting both in college and in industry. Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MCET-110
Foundations of Metals
This class explores the commonly used engineering metals. Differentiation of materials, with a focus on metals, is made based on an understanding and control of fundamental material properties. This knowledge of properties and materials then informs analysis of which metals are selected for various applications. Corrosion and its mitigation are explored. Materials selection software and internet resources are used. (Co-requisites: MCET-111 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
MCET-111
Characterization of Metals Lab
This lab class accompanies MCET-110 Foundations of Materials. An emphasis is placed on determining material, primarily metals, properties though experimentation and references, and analyzing why a particular material was selected for an application based on the materials properties. Differentiation of materials families is made based on properties. A variety of discovery activities are used to explore the world of metals, including labs of various types, materials selection software, and internet resources. (Co-requisites: MCET-110 or equivalent course.) Lab 1 (Fall, Spring).
1
MCET-150
Engineering Communication and Tolerancing
A course that integrates basic engineering techniques. Topics will emphasize the design and communication of components through the use of hand sketching, solid modeling, dimensioning, tolerancing, and current GD&T standards. Students will be expected to design, build, inspect, and integrate GD&T into designs. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in MFET-BS, RMET-BS, MCET-BS, EMET-BS or ENGTEH-BS.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Spring).
3
MFET-105
Machine Tools Lab
Proficiency with traditional machine shop tools will be demonstrated with an emphasis on safety. Students will demonstrate their abilities to interpret drawings and select the appropriate equipment needed to produce each part. Parts built will be inspected by the student to verify the meeting of part requirements. Students will repair/replace any parts that are found to be out of specifications. Inspection tools will be utilized in the product validation requirement of the course. Topics will be experimentally validated through the creation of mechanical parts that will be assembled into a final product. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in MFET-BS, RMET-BS, MCET-BS, EMET-BS or ENGTEH-BS.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
MFET-120
Manufacturing Processes
This course will focus on the understanding and application of manufacturing processes. Students will be challenged to discover and learn how typical piece parts and assemblies are manufactured. Topics include material properties and the following process families: casting, material removal, deformation, consolidation, powder metallurgy, plastics fabrication, EDM, water jet, chemical, LASERS, plasma, and rapid prototyping. (This class is restricted to MFET-BS or RMET-BS or MCET-BS or EMET-BS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
PHYS-111
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: College Physics I
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
 
General Education – First Year Writing: FYW (WI)
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
Choose one of the following:
3
    COMM-142
   General Education – Elective: Introduction to Technical Communication (WI)
This course introduces students to current best practices in written and visual technical communication including writing effective email, short and long technical reports and presentations, developing instructional material, and learning the principles and practices of ethical technical communication. Course activities focus on engineering and scientific technical documents. Lecture 3 (Fall).
 
   COMM-221
   General Education – Elective: Public Relations Writing (WI)
This course covers a variety of forms of writing for public relations, including news releases, newsletters, backgrounders, public service announcements, magazine queries, interviews, coverage memos, media alerts, features, trade press releases, and public presentations. Students will write for a variety of media including print, broadcast, and the web. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   COMM-253
   General Education – Elective: Communication (WI)
An introduction to communication contexts and processes emphasizing both conceptual and practical dimensions. Participants engage in public speaking, small group problem solving and leadership, and writing exercises while acquiring theoretical background appropriate to understanding these skills. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ENGL-360
   General Education – Elective: Written Argument (WI)
This course will focus on academic writing specifically, the arguments presented in different fields and professions about issues of significance. Students will learn about the rhetorical, ethical, emotional, historical and logical elements of persuasion as they relate to written and visual arguments and they will practice making claims, providing evidence, exploring underlying assumptions and anticipating counter-arguments as they relate to different audiences. In addition to argument analyses, students will develop arguments of their own through inquiry-based essays. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ENGL-361
   General Education – Elective: Technical Writing (WI)
Provides knowledge of and practice in technical writing. Key topics include audience analysis; organizing, preparing and revising short and long technical documents; designing documents using effective design features and principles, and formatting elements using tables and graphs; conducting research; writing technical definitions, and physical and process descriptions; writing instructions; and individual and group peer editing. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   SOIS-325
   General Education – Elective: Business Communication (WI)
This course focuses on the development of communication skills essential to functioning effectively in the business world. Students learn the process of analyzing communication situations and responding to them. Topics include an overview of business communication, writing well, delivering business communications, tools for talking in crucial conversations, oral and interpersonal communication including listening skills, public speaking, cross-cultural communication, communicating in the digital age and teamwork. *Note: This course cannot be taken by students in Saunders College of Business.* (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing. Saunders College of Business students are not permitted to take this course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
Second Year
CPET-121
General Education – Elective: Computational Problem Solving I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence in computational problem solving of engineering and scientific problems. The problems solved will stress the application of sequence, selection, repetitive, invocation operations, and arrays. The development of proper testing procedures to ensure computational accuracy will be stressed. Students, upon successful completion of this course, will be able to analyze introductory engineering and scientific problems, design, code, test, and document procedural software solutions. Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
EEET-215
Circuits and Electronics
Develops the skills to analyze introductory AC and DC circuits and electronics. Topics include Ohm’s Law; current and voltage division; simplification of circuits; reactance and impedance; and operational amplifier applications including current sources, strain gauge amplifiers, differential amplifiers and comparator circuits. (Prerequisites: (MATH-111 or MATH-171 or MATH-181) or (NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 and NMTH-220) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEET-216 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
EEET-216
Circuits and Electronics Laboratory
Students, upon completion of this course, will be able to use laboratory tools to analyze and troubleshoot AC and DC and basic electronic circuits. They will be able to operate a power supply, multi-meter, function generator, and oscilloscope. (Co-requisites: EEET-215 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
ENGT-95
Career Seminar
This course is an introduction to the cooperative educational program at RIT, the programs in the department, and RIT resources. Topics include engineering technology vs. engineering, review of resources available at RIT, the cooperative education placement process, and the ethical expectations of employers for co-op students and RIT during a job search. Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
EMET-290
Mechanics for Mechatronics
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of structures and machines, with applications to mechatronic components and systems. Students learn to calculate stresses and deflections in axially loaded members, beams, shafts, and columns. Topics include statically indeterminate problems, thermal stress, stress concentration, combined stress by superposition and Mohr’s Circle, thin-walled pressure vessels, columns and structure stability. The fundamentals of kinematics and kinetics of particle motion are developed including the study of Newton’s Laws of Motion, energy methods, impulse and momentum. Students also gain experience with laboratory equipment, experimental methods, team work, project management and communications as they complete laboratory and project assignments. Analysis and design principles are applied to mechatronic components and systems. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MCET-220 or MECE-103 or CVET-210 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-211
General Education – Elective: Elements of Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations
This course includes an introduction to differential equations, Laplace transforms, numerical methods in differential equations, and the calculus of functions of two variables. The emphasis is on the application of these topics to problems in engineering technology. (Prerequisites: C- or better MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or 1016-232 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MCET-210
Foundations of Non-Metallic Materials
This course will cover the process of selecting a best material for a given design application with a focus on polymeric materials. To support this process material families, strengthening mechanisms, and degradation mechanisms and prevention will be studied. The materials selection process will include economic, ecological, and ethical considerations. An emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of structure, process, and properties. This class expands upon concepts presented in MCET-110. (Prerequisites: C- or better in (CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or CHEM-151) and (MCET-110 and MCET-111) or (NETS-110 and NETS-111) or (MECE-304 or MECE-305 and MECE-306) or equivalent courses. Corequisite: MCET-211 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
MCET-211
Characterization of Non-Metallic Materials Lab
This course will consist of laboratory experiences which focus on property characterization of the properties of polymeric materials. (Co-requisites: MCET-210 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
MCET-220
Principles of Statics
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of structures and machines. Students learn to calculate unknown forces using the concept of equilibrium and free body diagrams and to calculate simple stresses and deflections for axially loaded members. Topics include forces, moments, free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, stress, strain, and deflection. Examples are drawn from mechanical, manufacturing, and civil engineering technology. Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MFET-340
Automation Control Systems
This course will provide a thorough understanding of the manufacturing automation principles, practices and system integration. Students will design a fully automated control system from selection of components, specifying the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), and developing the ladder logic required to operate the system. Students will have the tools to effectively be able to fully design an automated control system as in done in varying industries. (Co-requisite: MFET-341 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
MFET-341
Automation Control Systems Lab
This course will provide a thorough hands-on experience in using Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for manufacturing automation and system integration. Industry best practices for programming PLCs and the essentials of Human Machine Interface (HMI) for data entry, manipulation, and recording system status will be included. (Co-requisites: MFET-340 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
PHYS-112
General Education – Elective: College Physics II
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, fluids, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, opyics, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. (Prerequisites: PHYS-111 or 1017-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education - Social Perspective
3
Third Year
CPET-133
Introduction to Digital and Microcontroller Systems
This course introduces students to the underlying building blocks of digital system and microcontroller design. Digital systems topics that are covered include: number systems, truth tables, Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential logic, and finite state machines. A microcontroller is used to teach register programming, reading and writing digital I/O, bitwise operations and bit-masking and microprocessor architecture. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
MFET-499
MFET Co-op (spring, summer)
One semester of experience in a job related to the student's major. Completion of Co-op Orientation required before registering for co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
MFET-545
Electronics Manufacturing
This course provides a thorough understanding of the technology, components, equipment, materials and manufacturing process for through hole technology and surface mount technology electronics manufacturing. Students will develop a strong foundation needed for advanced work in surface mount technology (SMT). Topics in Design for Manufacturing are also considered for high volume vs. low volume manufacturing. Students may only receive credit for this course or MFET-655, not both. (Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken MFET-655.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall).
3
STAT-145
General Education - Elective: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education - Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
Fourth Year
MCET-330
Fluid Mechanics & Fluid Power
This course involves the study of the basics of fluid mechanics and fluid power. Areas of study include pressure, forces, viscosity, bulk modulus, flow characterization, efficiency and losses. Fluid Power systems and components are also reviewed including hydraulic/pneumatic systems, pumps, compressors, actuators, valves, accumulators, and directional control valves. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MCET-220 or MECE-103 or CVET-210 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MFET-420
Quality Engineering Principles
This course is designed to introduce the student to techniques required to maintain and improve quality within manufacturing organizations and the service sector through the use of statistical methodologies. The course covers concepts of quality, quality managements and assurance, product quality, design of quality control chart, statistical process control, and quality improvement through design by considering concept development and implementation. Traditional and modern quality systems will be discussed including the work of such quality gurus like Taguchi, Deming, Juran, and Shewhart. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or STAT-205 or STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MFET-450
Lean Production & Supply Chain Operations
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills of contemporary theories and practices in operations and supply chain management employed by world class manufacturing organizations. Students are introduced to topics that include forecasting, aggregate planning, inventory management, capacity management, and supply chain management. Integrated with these topics are lean excellence tools VSM, 5S, Kanban, OEE and Standard Work Practices, Cycle Time Analysis. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or STAT-205 or STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MFET-460
Integrated Design for Manufacture & Assembly
Integrated design for manufacture and assembly manufacturing processes are expanded and applied to the design process. Part concepts will be considered for various manufacturing processes to determine which process will yield the lowest cost part that meets all product functional requirements. Students will learn the DFMA methodology for making decisions to analyze the costs associated with their product concepts. Designs will consider the tooling that is required in product build and will understand the interrelationships between decisions and the cost associated with manufacture and service of the product. At the conclusion of the course students will be able to effectively design parts and assemblies for manufacture, assembly, and service. Costing will be considered at every step of the design process. (Prerequisites: MFET-120 or NETS-120 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MFET-499
MFET Co-op (summer)
One semester of experience in a job related to the student's major. Completion of Co-op Orientation required before registering for co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
MFET-585
Robots & Automation
This course deals with the technology and application of robots and Computer Numerical Control (CNC) in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) environment. It will provide a thorough understanding of robotic and CNC hardware and software. The hardware aspects include robot and CNC configurations, drive mechanisms, power systems (hydraulic, pneumatic, and servo actuators), end-effectors and end-of-arm-tooling, sensors, control systems, machine vision, programming, safety, and integration. The software aspect deals with the various methods of textual and lead through programming. Digital Interfacing of robots with other CIM components such as programmable logic controllers, computer-controlled machines, conveyors, etc. will be introduced. Robotic cell design and the socio-economic impact of robotics will also be discussed. A strong laboratory hands-on training component is a co-requisite for this course – MFET-586. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken MFET-685. (Prerequisites: MCET-220 or CVET-210 or MECE-103 or equivalent course. Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken MFET-685. Co-requisites: MFET-586 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
2
MFET-586
Robots & Automation Lab
This laboratory course provides hands on experience with robotics and CNC in manufacturing. (Co-requisites: MFET-585 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall).
1
STAT-146
Introduction to Statistics II
This course is an elementary introduction to the topics of regression and analysis of variance. The statistical software package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on business applications. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Fifth Year
MFET-499
MFET Co-op (fall)
One semester of experience in a job related to the student's major. Completion of Co-op Orientation required before registering for co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
MFET-580
Production Systems Design (WI-PR)
MFET-580 Production Systems Design and MFET-590 Production Systems Development together form manufacturing engineering technology senior project or capstone courses. In MFET 580 students gain design capabilities and communication skills for designing a fully functioning automated cellular production unit. In MFET 590, the students construct the cellular unit that produces a finished packaged product that was designed in MFET 580. (Prerequisites: MFET-340 and MFET-445 and MFET-460 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: MFET-590 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MFET-590
Production Systems Development
MFET-580 Production Systems Design and MFET-590 Production Systems Development together form manufacturing engineering technology senior project. This course is project-based. In MFET-590 students construct a fully functioning automated work cell that produces a finished packaged product. Students will also practice project management, project planning and effective communication while drawing on their past technical skills (e.g. Solid works) to complete the project. Students are tasked to use an integrated design, problem-solving process development, and assembly techniques in the completion of a fully functional automated workcell and product. Process improvement becomes inherent in the integrated activities. Design, final documentation, and demonstration of successful fully functional automated workcell and assembly of a product are required. (Prerequisites: MFET-340 and MFET-341 and MFET-445 and MFET-446 and MFET-460 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: MFET-580 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
124

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Accelerated Dual-Degree Programs

Today’s careers require advanced degrees grounded in real-world experience. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Pathways enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in as little as five years of study. You’ll earn two degrees while gaining the valuable, hands-on experience that comes from co-ops, internships, research, study abroad, and more. Learn how a Combined Accelerated Pathway can prepare you for your future, faster.

Robotics and Manufacturing Engineering Technology, BS degree/Manufacturing and Mechanical Systems Integration, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective: General Chemistry for Engineers
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 2, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-171
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Calculus A
This is the first course in a three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). This course includes a study of functions, continuity, and differentiability. The study of functions includes the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Limits of functions are used to study continuity and differentiability. The study of the derivative includes the definition, basic rules, and implicit differentiation. Applications of the derivative include optimization and related-rates problems. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-111 or C- or better in ((NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) and NMTH-220) or a math placement exam score greater than or equal to 50.) Lecture 5 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-172
General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Calculus B
This is the second course in three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). The course includes Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite integral. The techniques of integration include substitution and integration by parts. The applications of the definite integral include areas between curves, and the calculation of volume. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-171 or 1016-171T or 1016-281 or 1016-231 or equivalent course.) Lecture 5 (Fall, Spring).
3
MCET-101
Fundamentals of Engineering
Students will apply engineering problem solving methods used in industry to complete projects involving engineering topics such as mechanics, circuits, robotics, and thermodynamics. Software tools are used to model their designs, perform design calculations, collect and analyze data. Finally, students will present their work professionally using both written and oral communication software. The goal of the class is to have students become familiar with the many aspects of mechanical engineering through hands on, experiential learning and prepares them to work professionally and effectively in a team setting both in college and in industry. Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MCET-110
Foundations of Metals
This class explores the commonly used engineering metals. Differentiation of materials, with a focus on metals, is made based on an understanding and control of fundamental material properties. This knowledge of properties and materials then informs analysis of which metals are selected for various applications. Corrosion and its mitigation are explored. Materials selection software and internet resources are used. (Co-requisites: MCET-111 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
MCET-111
Characterization of Metals Lab
This lab class accompanies MCET-110 Foundations of Materials. An emphasis is placed on determining material, primarily metals, properties though experimentation and references, and analyzing why a particular material was selected for an application based on the materials properties. Differentiation of materials families is made based on properties. A variety of discovery activities are used to explore the world of metals, including labs of various types, materials selection software, and internet resources. (Co-requisites: MCET-110 or equivalent course.) Lab 1 (Fall, Spring).
1
MCET-150
Engineering Communication and Tolerancing
A course that integrates basic engineering techniques. Topics will emphasize the design and communication of components through the use of hand sketching, solid modeling, dimensioning, tolerancing, and current GD&T standards. Students will be expected to design, build, inspect, and integrate GD&T into designs. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in MFET-BS, RMET-BS, MCET-BS, EMET-BS or ENGTEH-BS.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Spring).
3
MFET-105
Machine Tools Lab
Proficiency with traditional machine shop tools will be demonstrated with an emphasis on safety. Students will demonstrate their abilities to interpret drawings and select the appropriate equipment needed to produce each part. Parts built will be inspected by the student to verify the meeting of part requirements. Students will repair/replace any parts that are found to be out of specifications. Inspection tools will be utilized in the product validation requirement of the course. Topics will be experimentally validated through the creation of mechanical parts that will be assembled into a final product. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in MFET-BS, RMET-BS, MCET-BS, EMET-BS or ENGTEH-BS.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
MFET-120
Manufacturing Processes
This course will focus on the understanding and application of manufacturing processes. Students will be challenged to discover and learn how typical piece parts and assemblies are manufactured. Topics include material properties and the following process families: casting, material removal, deformation, consolidation, powder metallurgy, plastics fabrication, EDM, water jet, chemical, LASERS, plasma, and rapid prototyping. (This class is restricted to MFET-BS or RMET-BS or MCET-BS or EMET-BS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
PHYS-111
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: College Physics I
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
UWRT-150
General Education – First Year Writing: FYW: Writing Seminar (WI)
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
Choose one of the following:
3
   COMM-142
   General Education – Elective: Introduction to Technical Communication (WI)
This course introduces students to current best practices in written and visual technical communication including writing effective email, short and long technical reports and presentations, developing instructional material, and learning the principles and practices of ethical technical communication. Course activities focus on engineering and scientific technical documents. Lecture 3 (Fall).
 
   COMM-221
   General Education – Elective: Public Relations Writing (WI)
This course covers a variety of forms of writing for public relations, including news releases, newsletters, backgrounders, public service announcements, magazine queries, interviews, coverage memos, media alerts, features, trade press releases, and public presentations. Students will write for a variety of media including print, broadcast, and the web. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   COMM-253
   General Education – Elective: Communication (WI)
An introduction to communication contexts and processes emphasizing both conceptual and practical dimensions. Participants engage in public speaking, small group problem solving and leadership, and writing exercises while acquiring theoretical background appropriate to understanding these skills. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ENGL-360
   General Education – Elective: Written Argument (WI)
This course will focus on academic writing specifically, the arguments presented in different fields and professions about issues of significance. Students will learn about the rhetorical, ethical, emotional, historical and logical elements of persuasion as they relate to written and visual arguments and they will practice making claims, providing evidence, exploring underlying assumptions and anticipating counter-arguments as they relate to different audiences. In addition to argument analyses, students will develop arguments of their own through inquiry-based essays. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ENGL-361
   General Education – Elective: Technical Writing (WI)
Provides knowledge of and practice in technical writing. Key topics include audience analysis; organizing, preparing and revising short and long technical documents; designing documents using effective design features and principles, and formatting elements using tables and graphs; conducting research; writing technical definitions, and physical and process descriptions; writing instructions; and individual and group peer editing. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   SOIS-325
   General Education – Elective: Business Communication (WI)
This course focuses on the development of communication skills essential to functioning effectively in the business world. Students learn the process of analyzing communication situations and responding to them. Topics include an overview of business communication, writing well, delivering business communications, tools for talking in crucial conversations, oral and interpersonal communication including listening skills, public speaking, cross-cultural communication, communicating in the digital age and teamwork. *Note: This course cannot be taken by students in Saunders College of Business.* (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing. Saunders College of Business students are not permitted to take this course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
Second Year
CPET-121
General Education – Elective: Computational Problem Solving I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence in computational problem solving of engineering and scientific problems. The problems solved will stress the application of sequence, selection, repetitive, invocation operations, and arrays. The development of proper testing procedures to ensure computational accuracy will be stressed. Students, upon successful completion of this course, will be able to analyze introductory engineering and scientific problems, design, code, test, and document procedural software solutions. Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
EEET-215
Circuits and Electronics
Develops the skills to analyze introductory AC and DC circuits and electronics. Topics include Ohm’s Law; current and voltage division; simplification of circuits; reactance and impedance; and operational amplifier applications including current sources, strain gauge amplifiers, differential amplifiers and comparator circuits. (Prerequisites: (MATH-111 or MATH-171 or MATH-181) or (NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 and NMTH-220) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEET-216 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
EEET-216
Circuits and Electronics Laboratory
Students, upon completion of this course, will be able to use laboratory tools to analyze and troubleshoot AC and DC and basic electronic circuits. They will be able to operate a power supply, multi-meter, function generator, and oscilloscope. (Co-requisites: EEET-215 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
EMET-290
Mechanics for Mechatronics
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of structures and machines, with applications to mechatronic components and systems. Students learn to calculate stresses and deflections in axially loaded members, beams, shafts, and columns. Topics include statically indeterminate problems, thermal stress, stress concentration, combined stress by superposition and Mohr’s Circle, thin-walled pressure vessels, columns and structure stability. The fundamentals of kinematics and kinetics of particle motion are developed including the study of Newton’s Laws of Motion, energy methods, impulse and momentum. Students also gain experience with laboratory equipment, experimental methods, team work, project management and communications as they complete laboratory and project assignments. Analysis and design principles are applied to mechatronic components and systems. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MCET-220 or MECE-103 or CVET-210 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
ENGT-95
Career Seminar
This course is an introduction to the cooperative educational program at RIT, the programs in the department, and RIT resources. Topics include engineering technology vs. engineering, review of resources available at RIT, the cooperative education placement process, and the ethical expectations of employers for co-op students and RIT during a job search. Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
MATH-211
General Education – Elective: Elements of Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations
This course includes an introduction to differential equations, Laplace transforms, numerical methods in differential equations, and the calculus of functions of two variables. The emphasis is on the application of these topics to problems in engineering technology. (Prerequisites: C- or better MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or 1016-232 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MCET-210
Foundations of Non-Metallic Materials
This course will cover the process of selecting a best material for a given design application with a focus on polymeric materials. To support this process material families, strengthening mechanisms, and degradation mechanisms and prevention will be studied. The materials selection process will include economic, ecological, and ethical considerations. An emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of structure, process, and properties. This class expands upon concepts presented in MCET-110. (Prerequisites: C- or better in (CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or CHEM-151) and (MCET-110 and MCET-111) or (NETS-110 and NETS-111) or (MECE-304 or MECE-305 and MECE-306) or equivalent courses. Corequisite: MCET-211 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
MCET-211
Characterization of Non-Metallic Materials Lab
This course will consist of laboratory experiences which focus on property characterization of the properties of polymeric materials. (Co-requisites: MCET-210 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
MCET-220
Principles of Statics
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of structures and machines. Students learn to calculate unknown forces using the concept of equilibrium and free body diagrams and to calculate simple stresses and deflections for axially loaded members. Topics include forces, moments, free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, stress, strain, and deflection. Examples are drawn from mechanical, manufacturing, and civil engineering technology. Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MFET-340
Automation Control Systems
This course will provide a thorough understanding of the manufacturing automation principles, practices and system integration. Students will design a fully automated control system from selection of components, specifying the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), and developing the ladder logic required to operate the system. Students will have the tools to effectively be able to fully design an automated control system as in done in varying industries. (Co-requisite: MFET-341 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
MFET-341
Automation Control Systems Lab
This course will provide a thorough hands-on experience in using Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for manufacturing automation and system integration. Industry best practices for programming PLCs and the essentials of Human Machine Interface (HMI) for data entry, manipulation, and recording system status will be included. (Co-requisites: MFET-340 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
PHYS-112
General Education – Elective: College Physics II
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, fluids, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, opyics, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. (Prerequisites: PHYS-111 or 1017-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
CPET-133
Introduction to Digital and Microcontroller Systems
This course introduces students to the underlying building blocks of digital system and microcontroller design. Digital systems topics that are covered include: number systems, truth tables, Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential logic, and finite state machines. A microcontroller is used to teach register programming, reading and writing digital I/O, bitwise operations and bit-masking and microprocessor architecture. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
MFET-450
Lean Production & Supply Chain Operations
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills of contemporary theories and practices in operations and supply chain management employed by world class manufacturing organizations. Students are introduced to topics that include forecasting, aggregate planning, inventory management, capacity management, and supply chain management. Integrated with these topics are lean excellence tools VSM, 5S, Kanban, OEE and Standard Work Practices, Cycle Time Analysis. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or STAT-205 or STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MFET-460
Integrated Design for Manufacture & Assembly
Integrated design for manufacture and assembly manufacturing processes are expanded and applied to the design process. Part concepts will be considered for various manufacturing processes to determine which process will yield the lowest cost part that meets all product functional requirements. Students will learn the DFMA methodology for making decisions to analyze the costs associated with their product concepts. Designs will consider the tooling that is required in product build and will understand the interrelationships between decisions and the cost associated with manufacture and service of the product. At the conclusion of the course students will be able to effectively design parts and assemblies for manufacture, assembly, and service. Costing will be considered at every step of the design process. (Prerequisites: MFET-120 or NETS-120 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MFET-499
MFET Co-op (summer)
One semester of experience in a job related to the student's major. Completion of Co-op Orientation required before registering for co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
MFET-545
Electronics Manufacturing
This course provides a thorough understanding of the technology, components, equipment, materials and manufacturing process for through hole technology and surface mount technology electronics manufacturing. Students will develop a strong foundation needed for advanced work in surface mount technology (SMT). Topics in Design for Manufacturing are also considered for high volume vs. low volume manufacturing. Students may only receive credit for this course or MFET-655, not both. (Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken MFET-655.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall).
3
MFET-600
MMSI Graduate Seminar
This course provides students that are new to the MMSI program an opportunity to develop an understanding of the department’s research activities. The students will become more knowledgeable about the Manufacturing & Mechanical Systems Integration program, career options, the capstone and thesis project process (finding an advisor, required documentation and policies regarding completing a project on co-op) and department policies and procedures related to successful completion of the MMSI program. (This course is restricted to graduate or BS/MS students in the MMSI-MS, MCET-BS/MS, MFET-BS/MS, and EMET-BS/MS programs.) Seminar 2 (Fall).
0
MFET-650
Manufacturing and Mechanical Systems Fundamentals (Counts as Undergraduate Open Elective)
This course is intended to help students learn to think like systems engineers. This course will provide a thorough understanding of the systems fundamentals, its design, modeling, and integration. Topics include a thorough coverage of systems architecture, conceptualization, modeling, development and management. Students in this course will be taught industry practices for systems engineering and management from concept stage to post implementation stage. System engineering and modeling tools will also be introduced to assist with the conceptualization, development, and implementation of systems. (This course is restricted to graduate or BS/MS students in the MMSI-MS, MFSI-MS, MCSI-MS and EMSI-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MFET-730
Six Sigma for Design and Manufacturing
This course presents the philosophy and tools that will enable participants to develop quality strategies and drive process improvements that are linked to and integrated with business plans. Continuous improvement principles are presented, within the six sigma format. The course will help prepare students for six sigma black belt certification. Students can receive credit for only one of the following: MFET-730, CQAS-701, or ISEE-682. (Prerequisites: Students may not take and receive credit for MFET-730 and STAT/CQAS-701 or ISEE-682.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STAT-145
General Education – Elective: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
STAT-146
General Education – Elective: Introduction to Statistics II
This course is an elementary introduction to the topics of regression and analysis of variance. The statistical software package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on business applications. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
Fourth Year
MCET-330
Fluid Mechanics & Fluid Power
This course involves the study of the basics of fluid mechanics and fluid power. Areas of study include pressure, forces, viscosity, bulk modulus, flow characterization, efficiency and losses. Fluid Power systems and components are also reviewed including hydraulic/pneumatic systems, pumps, compressors, actuators, valves, accumulators, and directional control valves. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MCET-220 or MECE-103 or CVET-210 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MFET-420
Quality Engineering Principles
This course is designed to introduce the student to techniques required to maintain and improve quality within manufacturing organizations and the service sector through the use of statistical methodologies. The course covers concepts of quality, quality managements and assurance, product quality, design of quality control chart, statistical process control, and quality improvement through design by considering concept development and implementation. Traditional and modern quality systems will be discussed including the work of such quality gurus like Taguchi, Deming, Juran, and Shewhart. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or STAT-205 or STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MFET-499
MFET Co-op (summer)
One semester of experience in a job related to the student's major. Completion of Co-op Orientation required before registering for co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
MFET-580
Production Systems Design (WI-PR)
MFET-580 Production Systems Design and MFET-590 Production Systems Development together form manufacturing engineering technology senior project or capstone courses. In MFET 580 students gain design capabilities and communication skills for designing a fully functioning automated cellular production unit. In MFET 590, the students construct the cellular unit that produces a finished packaged product that was designed in MFET 580. (Prerequisites: MFET-340 and MFET-445 and MFET-460 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: MFET-590 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MFET-585
Robots & Automation
This course deals with the technology and application of robots and Computer Numerical Control (CNC) in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) environment. It will provide a thorough understanding of robotic and CNC hardware and software. The hardware aspects include robot and CNC configurations, drive mechanisms, power systems (hydraulic, pneumatic, and servo actuators), end-effectors and end-of-arm-tooling, sensors, control systems, machine vision, programming, safety, and integration. The software aspect deals with the various methods of textual and lead through programming. Digital Interfacing of robots with other CIM components such as programmable logic controllers, computer-controlled machines, conveyors, etc. will be introduced. Robotic cell design and the socio-economic impact of robotics will also be discussed. A strong laboratory hands-on training component is a co-requisite for this course – MFET-586. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken MFET-685. (Prerequisites: MCET-220 or CVET-210 or MECE-103 or equivalent course. Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken MFET-685. Co-requisites: MFET-586 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
2
MFET-586
Robots & Automation Lab
This laboratory course provides hands on experience with robotics and CNC in manufacturing. (Co-requisites: MFET-585 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall).
1
MFET-590
Production Systems Development
MFET-580 Production Systems Design and MFET-590 Production Systems Development together form manufacturing engineering technology senior project. This course is project-based. In MFET-590 students construct a fully functioning automated work cell that produces a finished packaged product. Students will also practice project management, project planning and effective communication while drawing on their past technical skills (e.g. Solid works) to complete the project. Students are tasked to use an integrated design, problem-solving process development, and assembly techniques in the completion of a fully functional automated workcell and product. Process improvement becomes inherent in the integrated activities. Design, final documentation, and demonstration of successful fully functional automated workcell and assembly of a product are required. (Prerequisites: MFET-340 and MFET-341 and MFET-445 and MFET-446 and MFET-460 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: MFET-580 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STAT-670
Design of Experiments
How to design and analyze experiments, with an emphasis on applications in engineering and the physical sciences. Topics include the role of statistics in scientific experimentation; general principles of design, including randomization, replication, and blocking; replicated and unreplicated two-level factorial designs; two-level fractional-factorial designs; response surface designs. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
 
MMET Concentration Courses
6
 
Open Elective
3
Fifth Year
DECS-744
Project Management
A study in the principles of project management and the application of various tools and techniques for project planning and control. This course focuses on the leadership role of the project manager, and the roles and responsibilities of the team members. Considerable emphasis is placed on statements of work and work breakdown structures. The course uses a combination of lecture/discussion, group exercises, and case studies. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
   ACCT-603
   Accounting for Decision Makers
A graduate-level introduction to the use of accounting information by decision makers. The focus of the course is on two subject areas: (1) financial reporting concepts/issues and the use of general-purpose financial statements by internal and external decision makers and (2) the development and use of special-purpose financial information intended to assist managers in planning and controlling an organization's activities. Generally accepted accounting principles and issues related to International Financial Reporting Standards are considered while studying the first subject area and ethical issues impacting accounting are considered throughout. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   ACCT-706
   Cost Management
The development and use of cost data for external reporting and internal cost management (planning and control). Topics include job costing, process costing, joint product costing, cost reassignments, standard costs, activity-based costing, decentralization and transfer pricing, and cost variances. Consideration is given to manufacturing, service and retail organizations. (Prerequisites: ACCT-603 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
 
Choose one of the following:
3
   MFET-788
   MMSI Thesis Planning
Students will rigorously develop their thesis research ideas, conduct literature reviews, identify and plan methodologies, prepare schedules, and gain a clear understanding of the expectations of the faculty and the discipline. Each student will be required to prepare a committee approved thesis research proposal and may begin work on their thesis. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
 
   
   MMET Elective Course
 
Choose one of the following:
3
   MFET-797
   MMSI Capstone Project
This course provides the MMSI graduate students an opportunity to complete their degree requirements by addressing a practical real-world challenge using the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their studies. This course is not only the culmination of a student's course work but also an indicator of the student's ability to use diverse knowledge to provide a tangible solution to a problem. The capstone project topic can be in the areas of product development, manufacturing automation, management system, quality management or electronics packaging. The course requires a comprehensive project report and a final presentation. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   MFET-790
   MMSI Thesis
The MMSI thesis is based on thorough literature review and experimental substantiation of a problem, by the candidate, in an appropriate topic. A written proposal has to be defended and authorized by the faculty adviser/committee. The proposal defense is followed by experimental work, a formal written thesis, and oral presentation of findings. The candidate should have completed the requisite courses for the program before enrolling for the thesis. (Prerequisites: MFET-788 or equivalent course.) Thesis 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   MFET-795
   MMSI Comprehensive Exam and MMET Elective
A written comprehensive exam is one of the non-thesis or non-project methodology for completion of the MS-MMSI degree. Students will demonstrate a fundamental knowledge of the theories and foundation principles. This course will require the student to do an independent review of the concepts within the core courses and the chosen concentration area, and will culminate in a comprehensive written examination. The student must receive a passing grade of at least 80 percent to be successful. Students will have one additional opportunity to pass the exam, if their initial attempt results in a failing grade. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Comp Exam 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
 
Open Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2, 3
6
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
MMET Concentration Course
3
 
MMET Elective Course
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
154

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 3 years of math required; pre-calculus recommended
  • Chemistry or physics required; biology recommended
  • Technology electives desirable

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree
Courses in mathematics, science, engineering science, and engineering technology

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer
Manufacturing, mechanical, drafting and design, robotics, or electromechanical technology; engineering science

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

Accreditation

The robotics and manufacturing engineering technology major is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET. Visit the college's accreditation page for information on enrollment and graduation data, program educational objectives, and student outcomes.

Facilities

Latest News

  • April 29, 2021

    Three hand-crafted robots moving around an enclosed area.

    RIT’s VEX Robotics U team takes top placement in national competitions

    The RIT VEX U Robotics team placed third overall in its late March competition at the Purdue SIGBots Remote Skills Qualifier. It was the fourth event of the season and the team moved up to 12th among the 300 teams in the league that includes robots from the U.S., Canada, China, Puerto Rico, Morocco, Spain, and Mexico.

  • January 15, 2021

    researchers wearing clean suits analyzing a magnified view of an integrated circuit.

    New economy majors connect with emerging careers

    Analytical thinking, complex problem solving, creativity, resiliency, and flexibility are among the top skills needed for emerging careers by 2025. Anticipating these rapid changes in the workplace—further accelerated by lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic—RIT is seizing on the opportunity to guide students to “new economy majors” that are multi­disciplinary, transformative, and future-focused.