Business Analytics Minor

eb3d74c0-71b3-48ce-b04c-8ca951fa85ba | 6218970

Overview

The business analytics minor is designed for students who are interested in data analysis that supports business decision making and enhances organizational outcomes. The minor offers a strong complement for students in any major who would like to develop their skills in the management, analysis, visualization, and application of contemporary business data.

Notes about this minor:

  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
  • Notations may appear in the curriculum chart below outlining pre-requisites, co-requisites, and other curriculum requirements (see footnotes).

The program code for Business Analytics Minor is BANA-MN.

Curriculum for Business Analytics Minor

Course
Required Course
BANA-255
Business Analytics Fundamentals
This course serves as an introduction to business data, and contemporary analytics tools and techniques to analyze it. Data acquisition, cleansing, management, analysis and visualization will be addressed through hands-on projects. Project work will include contemporary business problems addressed using spreadsheets, programming and visualization tools. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
Choose four of the following:
   ACCT-445
   Accounting Information Systems
This course combines information systems concepts and accounting issues. In this course, we discuss the conceptual foundations of information systems, their applications, the control and auditing of accounting information systems, and the system development process. Topics include the business process, e-business, relational database, database design, computer fraud and security, accounting cycle, system analysis and AIS development strategies. Students analyze accounting information systems topics through problem solving, group project, presentations, exams, and case studies. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   DECS-310
   Operations Management
A survey of operations and supply chain management that relates to both service- and goods- producing organizations. Topics include operations and supply chain strategies; ethical behavior; forecasting; product and service design, including innovation and sustainability; capacity and inventory management; lean operations; managing projects; quality assurance; global supply chains; and the impacts of technology. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   DECS-435
   Supply Chain Management Fundamentals
This course introduces the basic concepts in supply chain management fundamentals as well as strategies and practice, and examines important managerial issues. Topics covered include forecasting, inventory management, third-party logistics, partnering, contracts, event management and conflict resolution, e-business, and strategy. (Prerequisites: DECS-310 or equivalent course.) Lecture .
   FINC-425
   Stock Market Algorithmic Trading
The course is a “hands-on” lab-based class designed to help students develop algorithmic trading strategies to invest in the stock market that can be implemented by retail and professional traders.The course has a strong emphasis on practical application with the purpose of building marketable skills for careers in finance. Students learn how to design algorithmic trading models through the use of a computerized trading platform that allows back-testing of data on thousands of different stocks. The software platform includes an automated wizard for building advanced technical trading models without programming knowledge; but also has an embedded programming language, similar to C-sharp, for those students that have those skills and elect to use them. (Knowledge of programming is not required; and there are no pre or co-requisites; but a laptop is strongly recommended.). Lecture 3 (Spring).
   FINC-580
   Financial Analytics
Financial analytics is the use of business analytics methods and tools on financial data to solve problems such as investment and risk analysis, portfolio optimization, valuation, default modeling, and so on. This course introduces a contemporary tool (R or Python) and its use in solving these problems. In this hands-on course, students also learn about the field of fintech. (Prerequisites: FINC-220 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   MGIS-320
   Database Management Systems
Transforming data into information is critical for making business decisions. This course introduces students to the concepts of data, information and the business database management systems (DBMS) used by modern organizations. Exercises and hands-on projects are used to model the information needs of an organization and implement and query databases using applications such as Microsoft Access and SQL. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   MGIS-350
   Developing Business Applications
Development of business applications is transforming from programming to integration of software components using application development environments. Students learn the fundamentals of computer programming and applications development through a set of programming exercises that focus on visual development environments and component integration. These exercises expand into a project where students apply concepts of typical development and project methodologies to complete a comprehensive programming assignment. Lecture 3 (Spring).
   MGIS-355
   Business Intelligence
The course is intended to provide an integrative foundation in the field of business intelligence at both the operational and strategic levels. Students will experience a variety of contemporary tools to analyze complex business data and arrive at a rational solution. Topic such as data warehousing, visualization and data mining will be covered, along with other topics relevant to the field of business intelligence. The computer will be used extensively throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MGIS-350 and MGIS-320 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   MGIS-450
   Enterprise Systems
This course explores the role of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems in organizations. Students analyze cross-functional business processes and ERP systems commonly used to support these processes. Students engage in a hands-on project using a current ERP system, such as SAP R/3, to demonstrate, analyze and design system structures, key data elements and process configurations that support cross-functional business processes, including accounting, sales, material management, production and distribution. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   MKTG-365
   Marketing Analytics
Marketing analytics is the practice of measuring, managing and analyzing marketing performance to maximize its effectiveness and optimize return on investment (ROI). Understanding marketing analytics allows marketers to be more efficient at their jobs and minimize wasted online and offline marketing dollars. It also provides marketers with the information necessary to help support company investment in marketing strategy and tactics. This course provides the participant with the necessary knowledge and practical insights that will help a marketing manager get more out of available data and take strategic advantage of the analysis. This interactive, participatory course is designed to answer key questions: “What is marketing analytics, how can marketing analytics improve my marketing efforts and how can I integrate marketing analytics into my business? (Prerequisites: MKTG-230 and STAT-145 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   MKTG-410
   Search Engine Marketing and Analytics
An examination of search engine marketing strategies to maximize site traffic, lower customer acquisition costs and boost conversion rates. Marketing frameworks provide the basis for the hands-on examination of search engine marketing and web analytics. (Prerequisites: MKTG-320 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

 

Sample Tracks*
Accounting Focus:
   ACCT-110
   Financial Accounting
An introduction to the way in which corporations report their financial performance to interested stakeholders such as investors and creditors. Coverage of the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   ACCT-445
   Accounting Information Systems
This course combines information systems concepts and accounting issues. In this course, we discuss the conceptual foundations of information systems, their applications, the control and auditing of accounting information systems, and the system development process. Topics include the business process, e-business, relational database, database design, computer fraud and security, accounting cycle, system analysis and AIS development strategies. Students analyze accounting information systems topics through problem solving, group project, presentations, exams, and case studies. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
Finance Focus:
   FINC-220
   Financial Management
Basic course in financial management. Covers business organization, time value of money, valuation of securities, capital budgeting decision rules, risk-return relation, Capital Asset Pricing Model, financial ratios, global finance, and working capital management. (Prerequisites: (ECON-101 or ECON-201) and ACCT-110 and (STAT-145 or STAT-251 or CQAS-251 or MATH-251 or MATH-252 or STAT-205) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   FINC-580
   Financial Analytics
Financial analytics is the use of business analytics methods and tools on financial data to solve problems such as investment and risk analysis, portfolio optimization, valuation, default modeling, and so on. This course introduces a contemporary tool (R or Python) and its use in solving these problems. In this hands-on course, students also learn about the field of fintech. (Prerequisites: FINC-220 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
Hospitality and Tourism Management Focus:
   HSPT-225
   Hospitality and Tourism Management Fundamentals
Hospitality and tourism industry is one of the largest industries in the world. This introductory course provides students with an overview of hospitality industry and segments of travel and tourism. Students are introduced to career opportunities and skills needed to succeed in the specific hospitality and tourism fields. Students examine the growth and development of industry segments and their distinguishing characteristics, current issues and trends. Students will learn about the interdependence of the various industry players and the roles of these diverse participants within the industry. The concepts and practices of hospitality management are examined and discussed. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   HSPT-315
   Lodging Operations Analytics and Management
This class includes an overview of hotel management from its opening to continuing operations. It focuses on the integrated functions of the front office, housekeeping, engineering, security, food & beverage, human resources, and accounting, as well as considering their roles individually. Students will apply revenue management principles (e.g., capacity management, duration control, demand and revenue forecasting), costing (e.g., budgeting, marginal costing, standard costing and variance analysis, labor accounting, balanced scorecard) and interpret hospitality financial statements (uniform system of accounts for lodging and restaurants) to understand and manage organizational performance. The course addresses foundational metrics and definitions used by the hotel industry and provides an opportunity to complete a certification exam (CHIA: Certification in Hotel Industry Analytics) by STR through the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 and HSPT-225 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
Marketing Focus:
   MKTG-230
   Principles of Marketing
An introduction to the field of marketing, stressing its role in the organization and society. Emphasis is on determining customer needs and wants and how the marketer can satisfy those needs through the controllable marketing variables of product, price, promotion and distribution. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3, Recitation 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   MKTG-365
   Marketing Analytics
Marketing analytics is the practice of measuring, managing and analyzing marketing performance to maximize its effectiveness and optimize return on investment (ROI). Understanding marketing analytics allows marketers to be more efficient at their jobs and minimize wasted online and offline marketing dollars. It also provides marketers with the information necessary to help support company investment in marketing strategy and tactics. This course provides the participant with the necessary knowledge and practical insights that will help a marketing manager get more out of available data and take strategic advantage of the analysis. This interactive, participatory course is designed to answer key questions: “What is marketing analytics, how can marketing analytics improve my marketing efforts and how can I integrate marketing analytics into my business? (Prerequisites: MKTG-230 and STAT-145 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   MKTG-410
   Search Engine Marketing and Analytics
An examination of search engine marketing strategies to maximize site traffic, lower customer acquisition costs and boost conversion rates. Marketing frameworks provide the basis for the hands-on examination of search engine marketing and web analytics. (Prerequisites: MKTG-320 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MIS Focus:
   MGIS-320
   Database Management Systems
Transforming data into information is critical for making business decisions. This course introduces students to the concepts of data, information and the business database management systems (DBMS) used by modern organizations. Exercises and hands-on projects are used to model the information needs of an organization and implement and query databases using applications such as Microsoft Access and SQL. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   MGIS-350
   Developing Business Applications
Development of business applications is transforming from programming to integration of software components using application development environments. Students learn the fundamentals of computer programming and applications development through a set of programming exercises that focus on visual development environments and component integration. These exercises expand into a project where students apply concepts of typical development and project methodologies to complete a comprehensive programming assignment. Lecture 3 (Spring).
   MGIS-355
   Business Intelligence
The course is intended to provide an integrative foundation in the field of business intelligence at both the operational and strategic levels. Students will experience a variety of contemporary tools to analyze complex business data and arrive at a rational solution. Topic such as data warehousing, visualization and data mining will be covered, along with other topics relevant to the field of business intelligence. The computer will be used extensively throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MGIS-350 and MGIS-320 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
Supply Chain Management Focus:
   DECS-310
   Operations Management
A survey of operations and supply chain management that relates to both service- and goods- producing organizations. Topics include operations and supply chain strategies; ethical behavior; forecasting; product and service design, including innovation and sustainability; capacity and inventory management; lean operations; managing projects; quality assurance; global supply chains; and the impacts of technology. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   DECS-435
   Supply Chain Management Fundamentals
This course introduces the basic concepts in supply chain management fundamentals as well as strategies and practice, and examines important managerial issues. Topics covered include forecasting, inventory management, third-party logistics, partnering, contracts, event management and conflict resolution, e-business, and strategy. (Prerequisites: DECS-310 or equivalent course.) Lecture .

* Within each track, students would be required to complete BANA-255 and two to three other minor electives as delineated. If students wish to do one of the focused tracks, students are able to use the pre-req classes to be used toward the elective course requirement. However, students cannot use only pre-req classes to satisfy the elective course requirement.