Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of science degree

9efe4957-73b9-42c9-830e-a85a7d2bc7e6 | 86047

Overview

From rockets to robots, power plants to biomechanical parts, mechanical engineers put both energy and machines to work.


Wherever there is motion or energy, mechanical engineers have played a role in the innovations that define modern life. RIT’s mechanical engineering degree provides students with a broad academic base complemented by hands-on laboratory activities and cooperative education experience. Students may also choose to concentrate their studies with professional electives focusing on aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, energy and the environment, bioengineering, or manufacturing and design.

Mechanical engineering is perhaps the most comprehensive of the engineering disciplines. The mechanical engineer’s interests encompass the design of automotive and aerospace systems, bioengineering devices, and energy-related technologies. The spectrum of professional activity for the mechanical engineering graduate runs from research through design and development to manufacturing and sales. Because of their comprehensive training and education, mechanical engineers often are called upon to assume management positions.

The mechanical engineering department offers professional courses in bioengineering, energy systems, applied mechanics, manufacturing, materials science, systems analysis, computer-aided graphics and design, robotics, and automotive and aerospace engineering. The department’s laboratories are equipped to provide extensive experimentation in these areas. Laboratory facilities include a well-instrumented wind tunnel, a particle imaging velocimetry laser system for flow visualization, advanced heat transfer systems, robotics, a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, engine dynamometers, fluid flow loops, refrigeration systems, tensile testers, compression testers, torsion testers, hardness testers, X-ray diffractometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic system simulators, a spectrum analyzer, and a well-equipped machine shop.

Educational objectives

The objectives of the mechanical engineering major are to prepare graduates to:

  • practice mechanical engineering in support of the design of engineered systems through the application of the fundamental knowledge, skills, and tools of mechanical engineering.
  • enhance their skills through formal education and training, independent inquiry, and professional development.
  • work independently as well as collaboratively with others, while demonstrating the professional and ethical responsibilities of the engineering profession.
  • successfully pursue graduate degrees at the master's and/or doctoral levels, should they choose.

Plan of study

The mechanical engineering major provides students with a broad academic base complemented by hands-on laboratory activities and cooperative education experience. Students devote their first two years to the study of mathematics, physical sciences, liberal arts, and engineering sciences, while the third and fourth years emphasize engineering science, design, and systems.

A student may then specialize by choosing appropriate technical and free elective courses in an area of interest. Each of the listed professional electives includes a significant design project. In the fifth year, each student is required to complete the capstone design courses, Senior Design I and II (MECE-497, 498).

Students complete liberal arts general education courses in the various perspectives to round out their education. During the course of their studies, students must demonstrate writing competency of the English language by successfully completing a Contemporary Issues course offered by the mechanical engineering department.

Options

Students may select a number of course options to gain specialized study in a particular discipline of mechanical engineering. Options include aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, bioengineering, and energy and environment. Participation in one of these options is not required. However, they are offered for those students who seek to pursue a career in one of these specialized fields of mechanical engineering. Students must maintain a GPA of at least 2.0 within the option sequence of courses to remain in the option.

Students may elect to complete the major without an option and instead customize their academic study in support of their career plans. The mechanical engineering major is relatively flexible and allows students to pursue options, minors, and even multiple degrees.

Aerospace engineering

The aerospace engineering option allows for specialized study in the engineering aspects of air- and space-borne vehicles and starts with a course introducing students to the aerospace field. The sequence starts in the third year with students taking a variety of electives focused on aerospace. In addition, students are expected to work on an aerospace engineering design project in Multidisciplinary Senior Design I and II (MECE-497, 498) and to pursue co-op employment in a related field.

Automotive engineering

The automotive engineering option offers a series of specialized professional elective courses during the fourth and fifth years that provide an introduction to vehicle power plants, dynamics, and control systems. In addition, students are expected to work on an automotive senior design in the fifth year and to pursue co-op employment in a related field.

Bioengineering

The bioengineering option provides an introduction to engineering sciences and design based upon a foundation of biological sciences. The course sequence starts with a biological science elective, which counts as a free elective. Students are expected to work on a bioengineering design project in their fifth year and to pursue co-op employment in a related field.

Energy and environment

This option provides students with exposure to a wide range of opportunities and careers associated with energy-intensive systems and how they relate to the environment. This option increases the number of opportunities students have for careers in the fields of building energy systems, alternative and renewable energy, and direct energy conversion. Students are expected to work on an energy systems design project in senior design and to pursue co-op employment in a related field.

Accreditation

The BS in mechanical engineering major is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. Visit the college's accreditation page for information on enrollment and graduation data, program educational objectives, and student outcomes.

Activities and professional organizations

Students have an opportunity to participate in regional and national design competitions such as the Formula SAE Autosports Competition team, the SAE Aerodesign Club, and the Human-Powered Vehicle Competition team. They also are encouraged to participate in the student chapters of professional societies such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Women Engineers, the National Society of Black Engineers, the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Society of Automotive Engineers.

Industries


  • Automotive

  • Manufacturing

  • Defense

  • Aerospace

100%

outcome rate of graduates

$65k

median first-year salary of graduates

Latest News

Curriculum

Mechanical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MECE-102
Engineering Mechanics Lab
This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in multiple accompanying laboratory sessions. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software.
3
MECE-104
Engineering Design Tools
This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, competently use a CAD package (CREO) to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes.
3
MECE-305
Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers
3
MECE-306
Materials Science and Applications Lab
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing.
1
MECE-103
Statics
This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines.
3
MECE-117
Introduction to Programming for Engineers
This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year Writing 
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
Second Year
EEEE-281
Circuits I and Lab
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
3
MECE-211
Engineering Measurements Lab
This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include: • Physical dimension variability assessment • Centrifugal pump performance evaluation • Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements • LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application • Transient measurements including computer data acquisition • Digital signal input and output Each topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission
2
MATH-219
Multivariable Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221.
3
MECE-205
Dynamics
A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems.
3
MECE-110
Thermodynamics I
A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances.
3
MECE-210
Fluid Mechanics I
Includes the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows: Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines, streak-lines. Classification of flows. fluid statics: hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws; systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation, some applications. Incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
MECE-203,204
Strength of Materials I and Lab
4
EGEN-099
Cooperative Education Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
Third Year
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (fall/spring)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
MECE-348
Contemporary Issues 
This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally.
3
MATH-326
Boundary Value Problems
This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems.
3
PHYS-212
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
MECE-301
Engineering Applications Lab
As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results.
2
MECE-310
Heat Transfer I
A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods.
3
 
ME Approved Science Elective
3
Fourth Year
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (fall or spring)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
MATH-241
Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
3
MECE-320
System Dynamics
This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation.
3
MECE-3xx
ME Extended Core Elective
3
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
Fifth Year
MECE-497
Senior Design I
The first of a two-course capstone design sequence. Students work in multidisciplinary design teams in an environment approximating an industrial setting. Emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills. In this course, student teams develop their proposed final design of a mechanical system after identifying possible alternative concepts. The final design must be supported by sound engineering analyses and by engineering drawings necessary to build a prototype. This course is intended to be taken as a capstone design experience near the conclusion of the student's program of study.
3
MECE-498
Senior Design II
The second of the two-course capstone design sequence. The same student teams from Senior Design I return to build and test a working prototype of their previously developed final design. Continued emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills.
3
STAT-205
Applied Statistics
This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252..
3
 
ME Extended Core or Applied Elective
3
 
ME Applied Electives
6
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
129

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Accelerated dual degree options

Accelerated dual degree options are for undergraduate students with outstanding academic records. Upon acceptance, well-qualified undergraduate students can begin graduate study before completing their BS degree, shortening the time it takes to earn both degrees. Students should consult an academic adviser for more information.

Mechanical engineering, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MECE-102
Engineering Mechanics Lab
This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in multiple accompanying laboratory sessions. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software.
3
MECE-104
Engineering Design Tools
This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, competently use a CAD package (CREO) to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes.
3
MECE-103
Statics
This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines.
3
MECE-117
Introduction to Programming for Engineers
This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
First Year Writing
3
Second Year
MATH-219
Multivariable Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221.
3
MECE-205
Dynamics
A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems.
3
MECE-110
Thermodynamics
A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances.
3
MECE-210
Fluid Mechanics I
Includes the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows: Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines, streak-lines. Classification of flows. fluid statics: hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws; systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation, some applications. Incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis.
3
EEEE-281
Circuits I and Lab
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
3
MECE-211
Engineering Measurements Lab
This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include: • Physical dimension variability assessment • Centrifugal pump performance evaluation • Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements • LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application • Transient measurements including computer data acquisition • Digital signal input and output Each topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission
2
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
MECE-203
Strength of Materials I
A basic course in the fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable media, including stress, strain, deflections and the relationships among them. The basic loadings of tension, compression, shear, torsion and bending are also included.
3
MECE-204
Strength of Materials I Lab
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-203. Students investigate a metallic material’s response to axial, torsional, and bending loads. Students are introduced to reduction and analysis of data, basic experimental techniques, and effective report writing.
1
EGEN-099
Cooperative Education Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
Third Year
MATH-326
Boundary Value Problems
This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems.
3
MATH-241
Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
3
MECE-348
Contemporary Issues
This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally.
3
MECE-305
Materials Science and Applications
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers
3
MECE-306
Materials Science and Applications Lab
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing.
1
MECE-310
Heat Transfer
A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods.
3
MECE-301
Engineering Applications Lab
As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results.
2
MECE-320
System Dynamics
This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation.
3
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (fall, spring, or summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
PHYS-212
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
 
ME Approved Science Elective
3
 
ME Extended Core Elective
3
Fourth Year
MECE-707
Engineering Analysis
This course trains students to utilize mathematical techniques from an engineering perspective, and provides essential background for success in graduate level studies. An intensive review of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms is provided. Laplace transform methods are extended to boundary-value problems and applications to control theory are discussed. Problem solving efficiency is stressed, and to this end, the utility of various available techniques are contrasted. The frequency response of ordinary differential equations is discussed extensively. Applications of linear algebra are examined, including the use of eigenvalue analysis in the solution of linear systems and in multivariate optimization. An introduction to Fourier analysis is also provided.
3
STAT-205
Applied Statistics
This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252..
3
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
 
Graduate Focus Area Course
3
 
Free Elective
3
 
Graduate Electives
6
Fifth Year
MECE-497
Senior Design I
The first of a two-course capstone design sequence. Students work in multidisciplinary design teams in an environment approximating an industrial setting. Emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills. In this course, student teams develop their proposed final design of a mechanical system after identifying possible alternative concepts. The final design must be supported by sound engineering analyses and by engineering drawings necessary to build a prototype. This course is intended to be taken as a capstone design experience near the conclusion of the student's program of study.
3
MECE-498
Senior Design II
The second of the two-course capstone design sequence. The same student teams from Senior Design I return to build and test a working prototype of their previously developed final design. Continued emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills.
3
MECE-709
Advanced Engineering Mathematics
This is a course in partial differential equations focused primarily on separation of variable techniques, and teaches the necessary vector space theory so that the problem solving methodology may be understood completely. Algebraic vector space concepts, such as the basis, are extended to functions, and operator theory is introduced as a means of unifying the solution structure of linear algebraic and differential equation systems. Existence and uniqueness is examined by considering the null and range spaces of algebraic and differential operators, the adjoint operator, and Fredholm's Alternative. Eigenvalue analysis is extended to functions, including an examination of Sturm-Liouville theory. Solutions of Laplace's equation, the heat equation, the wave equation, and the biharmonic equation are examined in a variety of geometries.
3
MECE-790
Thesis
Thesis In conference with an adviser, a topic is chosen. Periodic progress reports and a final written document with an oral examination are required.
6
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Elective
3
 
Graduate Focus Area Courses
6
 
Graduate Elective
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Mechanical engineering, BS/ME degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MECE-102
Engineering Mechanics Lab
This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in multiple accompanying laboratory sessions. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software.
3
MECE-104
Engineering Design Tools
This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, competently use a CAD package (CREO) to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes.
3
MECE-117
Introduction to Programming for Engineers
This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses.
3
MECE-103
Statics
This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year Writing
3
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Elective
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
MATH-219
Multivariable Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221.
3
MECE-205
Dynamics
A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems.
3
MECE-110
Thermodynamics 
A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances.
3
MECE-210
Fluid Mechanics I
Includes the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows: Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines, streak-lines. Classification of flows. fluid statics: hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws; systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation, some applications. Incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
EEEE-281
Circuits I and Lab
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
3
MECE-211
Engineering Measurements Lab
This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include: • Physical dimension variability assessment • Centrifugal pump performance evaluation • Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements • LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application • Transient measurements including computer data acquisition • Digital signal input and output Each topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission
2
MECE-203
Strength of Materials I
A basic course in the fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable media, including stress, strain, deflections and the relationships among them. The basic loadings of tension, compression, shear, torsion and bending are also included.
3
MECE-204
Strength of Materials I Lab
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-203. Students investigate a metallic material’s response to axial, torsional, and bending loads. Students are introduced to reduction and analysis of data, basic experimental techniques, and effective report writing.
1
EGEN-099
Cooperative Education Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
Third Year
MATH-326
Boundary Value Problems
This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems.
3
MECE-348
Contemporary Issues
This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally.
3
MECE-320
System Dynamics
This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation.
3
MATH-241
Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
3
MECE-310
Heat Transfer 
A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods.
3
MECE-305
Materials Science and Aplications
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers
3
MECE-306
Materials Science and Aplications Lab
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing.
1
MECE-301
Engineering Applications Lab
As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results.
2
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (summer, fall, spring)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
PHYS-212
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
 
Mechanical Engineering Approved Elective
3
 
Free Elective
3
 
ME Extended Core Elective
3
Fourth Year
MECE-707
Engineering Analysis
This course trains students to utilize mathematical techniques from an engineering perspective, and provides essential background for success in graduate level studies. An intensive review of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms is provided. Laplace transform methods are extended to boundary-value problems and applications to control theory are discussed. Problem solving efficiency is stressed, and to this end, the utility of various available techniques are contrasted. The frequency response of ordinary differential equations is discussed extensively. Applications of linear algebra are examined, including the use of eigenvalue analysis in the solution of linear systems and in multivariate optimization. An introduction to Fourier analysis is also provided.
3
MECE-730
Design Project Leadership
This course focuses on preparing students to take on a leadership role in design project teams. Topics include product development processes, management of design project teams, developing a business case for design projects, understanding customer needs and translating them into engineering specifications, tools for developing design concepts, tools for assessing the feasibility of design concepts, conducting engineering tradeoffs and analysis to synthesize a preliminary design. Students use the concepts and tools discussed throughout the course in a team-based environment to develop project packages.
3
STAT-205
Applied Statistics
This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252..
3
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
co-op
 
Science Electives
6
 
Graduate Focus Areas Course
3
 
Free Elective
3
 
Graduate Elective
3
Fifth Year
MECE-497
Senior Design I
The first of a two-course capstone design sequence. Students work in multidisciplinary design teams in an environment approximating an industrial setting. Emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills. In this course, student teams develop their proposed final design of a mechanical system after identifying possible alternative concepts. The final design must be supported by sound engineering analyses and by engineering drawings necessary to build a prototype. This course is intended to be taken as a capstone design experience near the conclusion of the student's program of study.
3
MECE-498
Senior Design II
The second of the two-course capstone design sequence. The same student teams from Senior Design I return to build and test a working prototype of their previously developed final design. Continued emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills.
3
MECE-709
Advanced Engineering Mathematics
This is a course in partial differential equations focused primarily on separation of variable techniques, and teaches the necessary vector space theory so that the problem solving methodology may be understood completely. Algebraic vector space concepts, such as the basis, are extended to functions, and operator theory is introduced as a means of unifying the solution structure of linear algebraic and differential equation systems. Existence and uniqueness is examined by considering the null and range spaces of algebraic and differential operators, the adjoint operator, and Fredholm's Alternative. Eigenvalue analysis is extended to functions, including an examination of Sturm-Liouville theory. Solutions of Laplace's equation, the heat equation, the wave equation, and the biharmonic equation are examined in a variety of geometries.
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
  Free Elective 3  
 
Graduate Focus Area Courses
6
 
Graduate Electives
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Mechanical engineering, BS degree/Science, technology and public policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MECE-117
Introduction to Programming for Engineers
This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses.
3
MECE-102
Engineering Mechanics Lab
This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in multiple accompanying laboratory sessions. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software.
3
MECE-104
Engineering Design Tools
This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, competently use a CAD package (CREO) to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes.
3
MECE-103
Statics
This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
First Year Writing 
3
Second Year
MECE-210
Fluid Mechanics I
Includes the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows: Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines, streak-lines. Classification of flows. fluid statics: hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws; systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation, some applications. Incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis.
3
EEEE-281
Circuits I and Lab
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
3
MECE-211
Engineering Measurements Lab
This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include: • Physical dimension variability assessment • Centrifugal pump performance evaluation • Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements • LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application • Transient measurements including computer data acquisition • Digital signal input and output Each topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission
2
MATH-219
Multivariable Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221.
3
MECE-205
Dynamics
A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems.
3
MECE-110
Thermodynamics 
A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
MECE-203
Strength of Materials I
A basic course in the fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable media, including stress, strain, deflections and the relationships among them. The basic loadings of tension, compression, shear, torsion and bending are also included.
3
MECE-204
Strength of Materials I Lab
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-203. Students investigate a metallic material’s response to axial, torsional, and bending loads. Students are introduced to reduction and analysis of data, basic experimental techniques, and effective report writing.
1
EGEN-099
Cooperative Education Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
 
Free Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Third Year
PHYS-212
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
MECE-305
Materials Science and Applications
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers
3
MECE-306
Materials Science and Applications Lab
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing.
1
MECE-320
System Dynamics
This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation.
3
MATH-326
Boundary Value Problems
This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems.
3
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (spring/fall and summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
Co-op
 
ME Science Elective
3
Fourth Year
STAT-205
Applied Statistics
This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252..
3
MATH-241
Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
3
MECE-348
Contemporary Issues
This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally.
3
MECE-310
Heat Transfer
A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods.
3
MECE-301
Engineering Applications Lab (WI)
As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results.
2
PUBL-701
Graduate Policy Analysis
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
PUBL-702
Graduate Decision Analysis
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
STSO-710
Science and Technology Policy Seminar
Examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence research and development, innovation, and the transfer of technology in the United States and other selected nations. Students in the course will apply basic policy skills, concepts, and methods to contemporary science and technology policy topics.
3
MECE-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field.
co-op
 
ME Extended Core Elective
3
 
Immersion 1, 2
6
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
Fifth Year
PUBL-700
Readings in Public Policy
An in-depth inquiry into key contemporary public policy issues. Students will be exposed to a wide range of important public policy texts, and will learn how to write a literature review in a policy area of their choosing.
3
PUBL-703
Program Evaluation and Research Design
The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered.
3
MECE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
The first of a two-course capstone design sequence. Students work in multidisciplinary design teams in an environment approximating an industrial setting. Emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills. In this course, student teams develop their proposed final design of a mechanical system after identifying possible alternative concepts. The final design must be supported by sound engineering analyses and by engineering drawings necessary to build a prototype. This course is intended to be taken as a capstone design experience near the conclusion of the student's program of study.
3
MECE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
The second of the two-course capstone design sequence. The same student teams from Senior Design I return to build and test a working prototype of their previously developed final design. Continued emphasis is placed on teamwork and on developing good oral, written and interpersonal communication skills.
3
 
Free Elective/Public Policy Elective
3
 
Extended Core/Applied Elective
3
 
Applied Elective/Public Policy Elective
3
 
Applied Electives
6
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
Choose one of the following:
6
  PUBL-799
   Thesis
 
 
   Two Graduate Electives and Comprehensive Exam
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 4 years of math required; including pre-calculus or above  
  • Chemistry and physics required

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Pre-engineering courses such as calculus, calculus-based physics, chemistry, and liberal arts.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in engineering science

Learn about admissions and financial aid