Mechanical Engineering Master of engineering degree

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Overview

Apply mechanical engineering principles and theories to enhance your skills through formal education and training, and independent inquiry.


The mechanical engineering masters prepares graduates to support the design of engineered systems through the application of the fundamental knowledge, skills, and tools of mechanical engineering. Students will work independently as well as collaboratively with leaders in industry, while demonstrating the professional and ethical responsibilities of the engineering profession. Ultimately, graduates will enhance their skills through formal education and training, independent inquiry, and professional development.

The ME in mechanical engineering is intended to be a terminal degree program designed for those who do not expect to pursue a doctoral degree, but who wish to become a leader within the mechanical engineering field. This program is particularly well-suited for students who wish to study part time, for those interested in updating their technical skills, or for those who are not focused on a research-oriented master of science degree, which requires a thesis. A conventional thesis is not required for the program. In its place, students complete a capstone experience, which may be a design project leadership course or a well-organized and carefully chosen industrial internship. A research methods course may also fulfill the capstone experience; however, this option is primarily intended for students who are considering transitioning to the MS program in mechanical engineering. (Courses taken within the ME program are transferrable to the MS program.)

Educational objectives

The ME in mechanical engineering program has outlined the following educational objectives to prepare graduates to:

  • practice mechanical engineering in support of the design of engineered systems through the application of the fundamental knowledge, skills, and tools of mechanical engineering.
  • enhance their skills through formal education and training, independent inquiry, and professional development.
  • work independently as well as collaboratively with others, while demonstrating the professional and ethical responsibilities of the engineering profession.

Plan of study

The program requires 30 credit hours. In addition to the two required courses, students choose three courses from nine different focus areas and four elective courses. All full-time equivalent students are required to attend graduate seminar weekly for each semester they are on campus. Up to three courses may be taken outside the mechanical engineering department. Students may complete the program's requirements within one calendar year with summer study. Students may also augment their education through cooperative education employment opportunities. Although co-op is not a requirement of the program, it provides students an opportunity to gain valuable employment experience within the field.

Industries


  • Automotive

  • Manufacturing

  • Defense

  • Aerospace

100%

outcome rate of graduates

$70k

median first-year salary of graduates

Latest News

Curriculum

Mechanical Engineering, ME degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MECE-707
Engineering Analysis
This course trains students to utilize mathematical techniques from an engineering perspective, and provides essential background for success in graduate level studies. An intensive review of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms is provided. Laplace transform methods are extended to boundary-value problems and applications to control theory are discussed. Problem solving efficiency is stressed, and to this end, the utility of various available techniques are contrasted. The frequency response of ordinary differential equations is discussed extensively. Applications of linear algebra are examined, including the use of eigenvalue analysis in the solution of linear systems and in multivariate optimization. An introduction to Fourier analysis is also provided.
3
MECE-709
Advanced Engineering Mathematics
This is a course in partial differential equations focused primarily on separation of variable techniques, and teaches the necessary vector space theory so that the problem solving methodology may be understood completely. Algebraic vector space concepts, such as the basis, are extended to functions, and operator theory is introduced as a means of unifying the solution structure of linear algebraic and differential equation systems. Existence and uniqueness is examined by considering the null and range spaces of algebraic and differential operators, the adjoint operator, and Fredholm's Alternative. Eigenvalue analysis is extended to functions, including an examination of Sturm-Liouville theory. Solutions of Laplace's equation, the heat equation, the wave equation, and the biharmonic equation are examined in a variety of geometries.
3
MECE-795
Graduate Seminar
This seminar course presents topics of contemporary interest to graduate students enrolled in the program. Presentations include off campus speakers, and assistance with progressing on your research. Selected students and faculty may make presentations on current research under way in the department. All graduate students enrolled full time (whether dual degree or single degree) are required to attend a designated number of seminars.
0
 
Graduate Focus Courses 
6
 
Graduate Electives
6
Second Year
Choose one of the following:
3
   MECE-730
   Design Project Leadership*
This course focuses on preparing students to take on a leadership role in design project teams. Topics include product development processes, management of design project teams, developing a business case for design projects, understanding customer needs and translating them into engineering specifications, tools for developing design concepts, tools for assessing the feasibility of design concepts, conducting engineering tradeoffs and analysis to synthesize a preliminary design. Students use the concepts and tools discussed throughout the course in a team-based environment to develop project packages.
 
   MECE-777
   Graduate Internship†
This course number is used by students in the master of engineering degree program for earning internship credits. Students must submit a proposal for the internship, to be approved by an employing supervisor and the department prior to enrolling. Students are required to submit an evaluation report at the conclusion of the internship.
 
   MECE-792
   Project with Paper‡
This course is used by students in the master of engineering degree program for conducting an independent project. The student must demonstrate an acquired competence in an appropriate topic within mechanical engineering. The topic is chosen in conference with a faculty adviser. The work may involve an independent research and/or a design project and/or literature search with a demonstration of acquired skill. A written paper, approved by the advisor and the department, and an oral presentation of the work are required.
 
MECE-795
Graduate Seminar
This seminar course presents topics of contemporary interest to graduate students enrolled in the program. Presentations include off campus speakers, and assistance with progressing on your research. Selected students and faculty may make presentations on current research under way in the department. All graduate students enrolled full time (whether dual degree or single degree) are required to attend a designated number of seminars.
0
 
Graduate Focus Course
3
 
Graduate Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

Graduate Seminar (MECE-795) is a 0 credit course required for all full-time and full-time equivalent students.

* Design Project Leadership (MECE-730) is reserved only for students enrolled in the accelerated BS/M.Eng. program.

† Graduate Internship (MECE-777) is an option for all ME students and student enrolled in the accelerated BS/M.Eng. program.

‡ Project with Paper (MECE-792) is an option for all ME students and students enrolled in the accelerated BS/M.Eng program.

 

Focus areas

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
Automotive systems
Choose three of the following:
  ISEE-740
   Design for Manufacture and Assembly
Course reviews operating principles of prevalent processes such as casting, molding, and machining. Students will use this knowledge to select appropriate production processes for a given component. For each process covered, guidelines governing proper design for manufacturability practices will be discussed and applied.
3
  MECE-623
   Powertrain Systems and Design
This course will introduce the analysis and design of power transmission systems. Topics covered include spur, helical, bevel, and worm gears, gear trains, planetary gear systems, power transmission shafts, belt and chain drives. The transmission of power at the required speed and torque is the primary function of most power transmission systems, and is the focus of this course. Students will use this foundation to complete a case study project whereby they review and analyse how power is transmitted from the primary source to the remainder of the driveline by means such as manual transmissions, automatic transmissions, continuously variable transmissions, and direct drive systems.
3
  MECE-624
   Vehicle Dynamics
The course focuses on the fundamentals of ground vehicle motion, control, and stability. The structure, stiffnes, and mechanisms by which tires generate longitudinal and lateral forces and self-aligning moments are discussed. Steering geometry and steady-state and transient steering response for bicycle and four-wheel vehicle models are analyzed. The effect of suspension geometry and stiffness on stability and ride are discussed. Transmission system design to match engine characteristics and achieve required vehicle performance is discussed.
3
  MECE-643
   Classical Controls
This course introduces students to the study of linear control systems, their behavior and their design and use in augmenting engineering system performance. Topics include control system behavior characterization in time and frequency domains, stability, error and design. This is accomplished through classical feedback control methods that employ the use of Laplace transforms, block diagrams, root locus, and Bode diagrams. An integrated laboratory will provide students with significant hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience.
3
  MECE-658
   Introduction to Engineering Vibrations
Is concerned with analytically finding the dynamic characteristics (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of vibratory mechanical systems (single-degree and multi-degrees of freedom systems), and the response of the systems to external excitations (transient, harmonic, and periodic). Application to vibration damping techniques (Dynamic Vibration Absorbers) is also covered. In addition, laboratory exercises are performed, and an independent design project is assigned.
3
  MECE-739
   Alternative Fuels and Energy Efficiency
This course provides an overview of the potential alternative fuels and energy efficiency technologies for powering current and future vehicles. Alternative fuel production technologies and utilization of fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol, and hydrogen will be covered. The primary technical and environmental issues associated with these alternative fuels will be discussed. Approaches to improving vehicle efficiency will also be explored. Students will be responsible for a final design or research project.
3
  MECE-752
   Tribology Fundamentals
This course provides an overview of the role of fluid-film lubrication in mechanical design, with strong emphasis on applications. Various forms of the Reynolds equation governing the behavior of lubricant films for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometry are derived. Mobility and impedance concepts as solution methods of the Reynolds equation are introduced for the performance assessment of lubricated journal bearings under static and dynamic loading. Short, long, and finite bearing assumptions are discussed. Finite element methods for the analysis of fluid-film bearings of arbitrary geometry will be introduced.
3
Business
ACCT-603
Accounting for Decision Makers
A graduate-level introduction to the use of accounting information by decision makers. The focus of the course is on two subject areas: (1) financial reporting concepts/issues and the use of general-purpose financial statements by internal and external decision makers and (2) the development and use of special-purpose financial information intended to assist managers in planning and controlling an organization's activities. Generally accepted accounting principles and issues related to International Financial Reporting Standards are considered while studying the first subject area and ethical issues impacting accounting are considered throughout.
3
MGMT-740
Organizational Behavior and Leadership
This course examines why people behave as they do in organizations and what managers can do to improve organizational performance by influencing people's behavior. Students will learn a number of frameworks for diagnosing and dealing with managerial challenges dynamics at the individual, group and organizational level. Topics include leadership, motivation, team building, conflict, organizational change, cultures, decision making, and ethical leadership.
3
Choose one of the following:
 
  ACCT-706
   Cost Management
The development and use of cost data for external reporting and internal cost management (planning and control). Topics include job costing, process costing, joint product costing, cost reassignments, standard costs, activity-based costing, decentralization and transfer pricing, and cost variances. Consideration is given to manufacturing, service and retail organizations.
3
  INTB-730
   Cross-Cultural Management
An analysis of comparative global business behavior and organization with particular emphasis on values, authority, individual and group relations, labor-management ties, risk tolerance, and motivational techniques. The course will prepare students to recognize different values and cultural factors in the global business community and how these shape and determine appropriate management behavior. The problems and opportunities of transferring management practices from one culture to another will also be examined.
3
  MGMT-735
   Management of Innovation in Products and Services
This course addresses the management of innovation, sustainable technology, and the importance of technology-based innovation for the growth of the global products and services industries. The course integrates three major themes: (1) leading-edge concepts in innovation, (2) the role of technology in creating global competitive advance in both product-based and services-based industries, and (3) the responsibility of businesses related to sustainability. The importance of digital technology as an enabler of innovative services is covered throughout the course. (completion of four graduate business courses)
3
Controls
MECE-643
Classical Controls
This course introduces students to the study of linear control systems, their behavior and their design and use in augmenting engineering system performance. Topics include control system behavior characterization in time and frequency domains, stability, error and design. This is accomplished through classical feedback control methods that employ the use of Laplace transforms, block diagrams, root locus, and Bode diagrams. An integrated laboratory will provide students with significant hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience.
3
Choose two of the following:
  EEEE-661
   Modern Control Theory
This course deals with a complete description of physical systems its analysis and design of controllers to achieve desired performance. The emphasis in the course will be on continuous linear systems. Major topics are: state space representation of physical systems, similarities/differences between input-output representation (transfer function) and state spate representations, conversion of one form to the other, minimal realization, solution of state equations, controllability, observability, design of control systems for desired performance, state feedback, observers and their realizations.
3
  EEEE-733
   Robust Control
This course will provide an introduction to the analysis and design of robust feedback control systems. Topics covered: overview of linear algebra and linear systems, H2 and H( spaces, modeling and paradigms for robust control; internal stability; nominal performance (asymptotic tracking); balanced model reduction; uncertainty and robustness; H2 optimal control; H( control; H( loop shaping; controller reduction; and design for robust stability and performance.
3
  EEEE-765
   Optimal Control
The course covers different optimization techniques, as applied to feedback control systems. The main emphasis will be on the design of optimal controllers for digital control systems. The major topics are: Different performance indices, formulation of optimization problem with equality constraints, Lagrange multipliers, Hamiltonian and solution of discrete optimization problem. Discrete Linear Quadratic Regulators (LQR), optimal and suboptimal feedback gains, Riccati equation and its solution, linear quadratic tracking problem. Dynamic Programming - Bellman's principle of optimality - Optimal controllers for discrete and continuous systems - Systems with magnitude constraints on inputs and states.
3
  MECE-606
   Systems Modeling
This course is designed to introduce the student to advanced systems modeling techniques and response characterization. Mechanical, electrical, fluid, and mixed type systems will be considered. Energy-based modeling methods such as Lagrange’s methods will be used extensively for developing systems models. System performance will be assessed through numerical solution using MATLAB/Simulink. Computer projects using Matlab/Simulink will be assigned and graded in this course including concepts of data analysis and how it performs to parmeter estimation. Linearization of nonlinear system models and verification methods are also discussed.
3
  MECE-743
   Digital Controls
This course builds on the fundamentals of continuous feedback control to introduce the student to computer (digital) regulation of systems in closed-loop. Discrete-time modeling and stability of signals and systems are discussed. Analog and digital control schemes are compared using s domain to z-domain conversion, and time-domain response characterization. Closed-loop system design objective specification and evaluation is conducted through numerical simulation and experimental observation. Various discrete-time controller designs are implemented and evaluated using Matlab/Simulink. A series of experimental excercises included using concepts throughout the course on an embedded controller.
3
  MECE-744
   Nonlinear Controls
This course introduces the student to methods used to design advanced nonlinear control systems. Topics of this course include: Phase-State Plane Analysis, Existence of Limit Cycles, Lyapunov Stability (Direct and Indirect methods), nonlinear control design using Feedback Linearization, the Sliding Mode Control method, Numerical Optimization of PID laws, and Adaptive Control strategies. Students are expected to complete computer projects using Matlab/Simulink.
3
Manufacturing
Choose three of the following
  ISEE-626
   Contemporary Production Systems
The focus of this course is Lean. Lean is about doing more with less - less human effort, less equipment, less time, less space. In other words, lean is about the application of industrial engineering principles and tools to the entire supply chain or value stream. The focus of this course will be learning and applying the principles and tools of lean such as value, value stream mapping, takt, flow, pull, kaizen, standard work, line design, and others, all in the context of continuous process improvement. By the end of this course, the student will possess the essential tools and skills to apply lean in their production system from either a line (supervisor or manager) or staff role.
3
  ISEE-720
   Production Control
This course will cover the role, the steps and the analysis methods to produce goods and services in support of the production and operations management functions. Topics include: forecasting, inventory policies and models, production systems and philosophies (e.g. JIT/Lean), job shop scheduling, aggregate production planning, and Material Requirement Planning (MRP). Students will understand the importance of production control and its relationship to other functions within the organization. Case studies and the design of actual production systems will be emphasized.
3
  ISEE-740
   Design for Manufacture and Assembly
Course reviews operating principles of prevalent processes such as casting, molding, and machining. Students will use this knowledge to select appropriate production processes for a given component. For each process covered, guidelines governing proper design for manufacturability practices will be discussed and applied.
3
  ISEE-741
   3D Printing
This course begins with an introduction to commercial rapid prototyping processes, the materials involved, and the physics behind how they work. The course then transitions to research topics involving novel processes, applications, and materials. Class activities include a mix of lecture, lab, and project work.
3
  ISEE-745
   Manufacturing Systems
This course will provide an introduction to concepts and techniques in the design and analysis of production systems. A blend of traditional and modern approaches is brought into the classroom. At the end of the quarter, the student will be able to assess and analyze the performance of a given manufacturing system as well as to provide a framework for system redesign and improvement. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing and setup time reduction are included in the context of the course.
3
  MECE-643
   Classical Controls
This course introduces students to the study of linear control systems, their behavior and their design and use in augmenting engineering system performance. Topics include control system behavior characterization in time and frequency domains, stability, error and design. This is accomplished through classical feedback control methods that employ the use of Laplace transforms, block diagrams, root locus, and Bode diagrams. An integrated laboratory will provide students with significant hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience.
3
Mechanics-Design/Materials
Choose three of the following:
  MECE-605
   Finite Elements
This course focuses upon theoretical and applied concepts pertaining to the finite element method. Direct and weighted residual formulation methods are derived and applied to problems in the area of structural analysis, fluid flow, and heat transfer. Foundational topics include shape functions, element formulation, element assembly, boundary conditions, matrix solution methods, mesh refinement, and convergence. The use of a standard commercial finite element software package is introduced.
3
  MECE-620
   Introduction to Optimal Design
This course is an introduction to basic optimization techniques for engineering design synthesis. Topics covered include: techmiques, the general problem statement, necessary conditions of optimization, numerical techniques for unconstrained optimization, constrained optimization through unconstrained optimization, and direct methods. Numerical solutions are obtained using MATLAB.software. A design project is required.
3
  MECE-623
   Powertrain Systems and Design
This course will introduce the analysis and design of power transmission systems. Topics covered include spur, helical, bevel, and worm gears, gear trains, planetary gear systems, power transmission shafts, belt and chain drives. The transmission of power at the required speed and torque is the primary function of most power transmission systems, and is the focus of this course. Students will use this foundation to complete a case study project whereby they review and analyse how power is transmitted from the primary source to the remainder of the driveline by means such as manual transmissions, automatic transmissions, continuously variable transmissions, and direct drive systems.
3
  MECE-644
   Introduction to Composite Materials
This course is an introductory course to the fundamentals and applications of composite materials. Topics covered include constituents of composite materials, fabrication techniques, micromechanical analysis, macromechanical analysis, and the use of composites in design. Some laboratory work is to be performed, and a design project is required.
3
  MECE-657
   Applied Biomaterials
This course provides an overview of materials used in biomedical applications. Topics covered include structure and properties of hard and soft biomaterials, material selection for medical applications, material performance and degradation in hostile environments, and typical and abnormal physiological responses to biomaterials/environments. Some experiments will be performed in class and a major project is required.
3
  MECE-752
   Tribology Fundamentals
This course provides an overview of the role of fluid-film lubrication in mechanical design, with strong emphasis on applications. Various forms of the Reynolds equation governing the behavior of lubricant films for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometry are derived. Mobility and impedance concepts as solution methods of the Reynolds equation are introduced for the performance assessment of lubricated journal bearings under static and dynamic loading. Short, long, and finite bearing assumptions are discussed. Finite element methods for the analysis of fluid-film bearings of arbitrary geometry will be introduced.
3
  MECE-785
   Advanced Mechanics of Solids
This course provides a more advanced treatment of stress and strain concepts pertaining to the mechanics of deformable media and provides a theoretical foundation for a concurrent or follow-on course in finite elements. Topics include stress and strain transformations, two-dimensional theory of elasticity, stress functions, torsion, plate bending, and energy methods.
3
Product development
Choose three of the following:
  DECS-744
   Project Management*
A study in the principles of project management and the application of various tools and techniques for project planning and control. This course focuses on the leadership role of the project manager, and the roles and responsibilities of the team members. Considerable emphasis is placed on statements of work and work breakdown structures. The course uses a combination of lecture/discussion, group exercises, and case studies.
3
  ISEE-741
   3D Printing
This course begins with an introduction to commercial rapid prototyping processes, the materials involved, and the physics behind how they work. The course then transitions to research topics involving novel processes, applications, and materials. Class activities include a mix of lecture, lab, and project work.
3
  ISEE-750
   Systems and Project Management*
Systems and Project Management ensures progress toward objectives, proper deployment and conservation of human and financial resources, and achievement of cost and schedule targets. The focus of the course is on the utilization of a diverse set of project management methods and tools. Topics include strategic project management, project and organization learning, cost, schedule planning and control, structuring of performance measures and metrics, technical teams and project management, information technology support of teams, risk management, and process control. Course delivery consists of lectures, speakers, case studies, and experience sharing, and reinforces collaborative project-based learning and continuous improvement.
3
  ISEE-751
   Decision and Risk Benefit Analysis
This course addresses decision making in the face of risk and uncertainty. Various methodologies will be introduced that are useful in describing and making decisions about risks, with particular emphasis on those associated with the design of products. Students will be exposed to issues related to balancing risks and benefits in situations involving human safety, product liability, environmental impact, and financial uncertainty. Presentations will be made of risk assessment studies, public decision processes, and methods for describing and making decisions about the societal risks associated with engineering projects. Topics include probabilistic risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, reliability and hazard analysis, decision analysis, portfolio analysis, and project risk management.
3
  ISEE-771
   Engineering of Systems I
This course covers the principles of product, manufacturing process and supply chain development in an integrated fashion. It will examine the methodologies and tools to systematically define, develop and produce world-class products. Students will work on a project to put these methodologies and tools into practice. Major topics include: product planning and definition, characterization of user value, lean product development, product requirements and benchmarking, concept generation, design for "X" (manufacturing/ assembly/ service/ environment, etc.), sustainable design, design for lean six sigma.
3
  ISEE-772
   Engineering of Systems II
The engineering of a system focuses on the overall concept, performance, requirements and behavioral aspects of the system. This course builds on the concepts discussed in Engineering of Systems I. Topics include concept generation and innovation techniques, outsourced product development, requirements engineering and management, critical parameter management, robust design and latitude development, quality by design, advanced product development project management, and lean product development. Students will learn several systems analysis techniques and may include a team based project.
3
Sustainability
Choose three of the following:
  ISEE-785
   Fundamentals of Sustainable Engineering
This is a high level survey course that reviews the product lifecycle from various perspectives and highlights the leverage over material, process, and environmental impacts available at the design phase. Tools and strategies for reducing the environmental impacts associated with the sourcing, manufacture, use, and retirement of products will be reviewed and evaluated.
3
  ISEE-786
   Lifecycle Assessment
This course introduces students to the challenges posed when trying to determine the total lifecycle impacts associated with a product or a process design. Various costing models and their inherent assumptions will be reviewed and critiqued. The inability of traditional costing models to account for important environmental and social externalities will be highlighted. The Lifecycle Assessment approach for quantifying environmental and social externalities will be reviewed and specific LCA techniques (Streamlined Lifecycle Assessment, SimaPro) will be covered.
3
  ISEE-787
   Design for the Environment
This course will provide the student with systematic approaches for designing and developing environmentally responsible products. In particular, design trade-offs will be explored.
3
  MECE-629
   Renewable Energy Systems
This course provides an overview of renewable energy system design. Energy resource assessment, system components, and feasibility analysis will be covered. Possible topics to be covered include photovoltaics, wind turbines, solar thermal, hydropower, biomass, and geothermal. Students will be responsible for a final design project.
3
  MECE-733
   Sustainable Energy Management
This course, Sustainable Energy Management and the Built Environment, provides an overview of mechanical and associated control systems within buildings with an emphasis on sub-systems which possess the most visible energy signature in terms of energy usage, energy inefficiency, and societal/global impact. Fundamentals of system operation are explored as well as energy management techniques. Using domestic and international case studies which highlight energy management within the built environment, students will explore methods by which engineers have achieved solutions aligned with sustainability.
3
  MECE-739
   Alternative Fuels and Energy Efficiency
This course provides an overview of the potential alternative fuels and energy efficiency technologies for powering current and future vehicles. Alternative fuel production technologies and utilization of fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol, and hydrogen will be covered. The primary technical and environmental issues associated with these alternative fuels will be discussed. Approaches to improving vehicle efficiency will also be explored. Students will be responsible for a final design or research project.
3
Thermo/Fluids Engineering
Choose three of the following:
  MCSE-610
   Applied Biofluid Mechanics and Microcirculation
This is a one-semester introductory graduate course that introduces and develops fundamental understanding of the flow dynamics of blood. The course includes a discussion of basic fluid mechanics, blood rheology, and biological regulation of blood flow. Emphasis will be placed on developing a physical understanding of each of the fundamental ideas and how it is applied to microcirculation and cutting-edge biomedical research. Applications of state-of-art micro/nanotechnologies such as microfluidics in the study of microcirculation, tissue engineering, and blood diagnostic will be also discussed in the class. The course is also open to undergraduate students who have taken courses in fluid dynamics, e.g., MECE (210)-Fluid Mechanics I, BIME (320)- Fluid Mechanics or equivalent, and are interested in blood flow and related biomedical engineering technologies.
3
  MECE-725
   Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics
The course presents the conceptual understanding necessary to design, modify and solve real world fluid flow codes. It will address solution methods for inviscid external flows at subsonic and supersonic levels, viscous flow solutions at subcritical Reynolds numbers, and steady and unsteady heat conduction.
3
  MECE-731
   Computational Fluid Dynamics
This course covers the basics of introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) n fluid mechanics and heat transfer. CFD methods of flow modeling are introduced with emphasis of in-class use of CFD software for modeling and problem solution. Course work involves tutorials and design examples. This course also  introduces the students to some of the commercial CFD codes being used for solving thermal-fluid problems. Students complete an individual CFD study project including a written report and a presentation of the results.
3
  MECE-738
   Ideal Flows
This course covers the fundamental topics in the theory of aerodynamics and high speed flows. The course discusses modern aerodynamic applications in the areas of wing and airfoil design, wind tunnel testing and compressible flows.
3
  MECE-751
   Convective Phenomena
This course introduces the student to the flow of real incompressible fluids. The differential approach is used to develop and solve the equations governing the phenomena of mass, momentum, and heat transfer. The material in the course provides the necessary background for a study of computational fluid dynamics.
3
Vibrations engineering
MECE-658
Introduction to Engineering Vibrations
Is concerned with analytically finding the dynamic characteristics (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of vibratory mechanical systems (single-degree and multi-degrees of freedom systems), and the response of the systems to external excitations (transient, harmonic, and periodic). Application to vibration damping techniques (Dynamic Vibration Absorbers) is also covered. In addition, laboratory exercises are performed, and an independent design project is assigned.
3
MECE-758
Intermediate Engineering Vibrations
Is concerned with analytically finding the dynamic characteristics (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of continuous mechanical vibratory systems (strings, rods, and beams), and the response of the systems to external excitations (transient and harmonic). Solutions using the finite element method is also introduced.
3
Choose one of the following:
  EEEE-602
   Random Signals and Noise
In this course the student is introduced to random variables and stochastic processes. Topics covered are probability theory, conditional probability and Bayes theorem, discrete and continuous random variables, distribution and density functions, moments and characteristic functions, functions of one and several random variables, Gaussian random variables and the central limit theorem, estimation theory , random processes, stationarity and ergodicity, auto correlation, cross-correlation and power spectrum density, response of linear prediction, Wiener filtering, elements of detection, matched filters.
3
  EEEE-678
   Digital Signal Processing
In this course, the student is introduced to the concept of multi rate signal processing, Poly phase Decomposition, Transform Analysis, Filter Design with emphasis on Linear Phase Response, and Discrete Fourier Transforms. Topics covered are: Z- Transforms, Sampling, Transform Analysis of Linear Time Invariant Systems, Filter Design Techniques, Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFT), Fast Algorithms for implementing the DFT including Radix 2, Radix 4 and Mixed Radix Algorithms, Quantization Effects in Discrete Systems and Fourier Analysis of Signals.
3
  MECE-606
   System Modeling
This course is designed to introduce the student to advanced systems modeling techniques and response characterization. Mechanical, electrical, fluid, and mixed type systems will be considered. Energy-based modeling methods such as Lagrange’s methods will be used extensively for developing systems models. System performance will be assessed through numerical solution using MATLAB/Simulink. Computer projects using Matlab/Simulink will be assigned and graded in this course including concepts of data analysis and how it performs to parmeter estimation. Linearization of nonlinear system models and verification methods are also discussed.
3

 

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the ME program in mechanical engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college in mechanical engineering, physics, or a related field.
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit scores from the GRE.
  • Submit two letters of recommendation from academic or professional sources.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 79 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.
  • International students are required to submit scores from the GRE. Minimum scores of 302 (V&Q) and 3.0 (writing) and required.

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