Nutritional Sciences Bachelor of Science Degree

RIT’s nutritional sciences degree combines nutrition, biology, and behavioral health to prepare you to design and administer health, nutrition, and wellness programs.


100%

Of all incoming RIT first-year and transfer students receive aid


Overview for Nutritional Sciences BS

Why Pursue a Degree in Nutritional Science at RIT

  • A Variety of Career Paths: Become well-prepared for careers in dietetics, food science, and nutrition-related health care, or for graduate programs in medicine and the health sciences.
  • An Excellent Pre-Med Major: Complete the required pre-med course work in biological and physical sciences while gaining nutrition knowledge pertinent to your future medical career.
  • Two Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Pathways: Combine your BS in nutritional sciences with an MS in dietetics and nutrition or an MS in health and well-being management.
  • Become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN): By earning the dual degree (BS in nutritional sciences/MS in dietetics and nutrition) you are eligible to sit for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credentialing exam.

Understanding nutrition and its power to treat and prevent illness and disease can have a remarkable impact on our health. Educating the public about the benefits of nutrition and the various ways healthy living can improve our well-being is the focus of the BS degree in nutritional sciences.

What is Nutritional Science?

Nutritional science encompasses the study of food, nutrients, and dietary substances and their effects on the human body. The field investigates the complex interactions between diet and health with a goal of developing strategies that improve health and reduce the risk of disease. It’s a dynamic health care field where nutritional scientists identify ways to help people and communities live healthier, better manage their health, and prevent disease and/or disease progression.

Studying Nutrition at RIT

The nutritional sciences degree blends biological, chemical, and behavioral sciences to create a potent mix of course work that prepares you for dynamic careers that translate the science of food into treatment, policy, and practice. RIT’s bachelor’s degree in nutrition covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards, and the application of these standards to a person’s life. You will learn to analyze food and to develop strategies to help people make dietary changes that can positively impact good health in both the short- and long-term.

Learn more about the program goals of the bachelor’s degree in nutritional sciences.

Comprehensive Nutrition Courses

RIT’s nutrition major offers a challenging selection of nutrition courses that prepare you with an in-depth understanding of nutrition as an important factor of good health. An effective nutrition professional is skilled in working with people to address behavioral issues, teach clients about nutrition and health properties in food, and offer nutrition guidance, advice, and supervision. The nutrition major offers a comprehensive curriculum that provides a solid foundation in nutritional sciences as well as skills in leadership, communication, problem solving, and team dynamics.

Elective Nutrition Courses

The curriculum is flexible in allowing you to choose elective courses that explore areas of nutrition you find interesting or provide a level of knowledge that aligns with your career goals. We offer more than 180 elective courses covering a range of topic areas related to nutritional sciences and its related fields. A sampling includes:

Field Sample Elective Courses*
Anthropology Cultural Anthropology; Cuisine, Culture, and Power; Bodies and Culture
Biology Food Microbiology; Genetic Engineering; Plants, Medicine, and Technology
Exercise Science Sports Physiology and Life Fitness; Coaching Healthy Behaviors; Training High Performance Athletes
Medicine Community Healthcare; Endocrinology; Human Development
Psychology and Clinical Psychology Addiction Pharmacology; Learning and Behavior; Social Psychology

* For a full list of nutrition elective courses please contact the program chair.


Enhance Your Nutrition Degree

Adding a minor in a complementary area of study deepens your expertise in the core areas of nutrition, exercise, health care, public health, and more. With dozens of minors to choose from, you’ll have your choice of topics to study. While you may choose any minor or immersion as part of your studies, select minors serve to boost the bachelor's degree in nutritional sciences. These include:

Prospective Students: Effective January 1, 2024, a minimum of a master's degree is required to be eligible to sit for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credentialing exam. RIT’s accelerated dual degree in nutritional sciences (BS) and dietetics and nutrition (MS) meets these requirements. Learn more about Becoming a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.

Furthering Your Education in Nutritional Sciences

Today’s careers in nutrition benefit from advanced degrees that are grounded in real-world experience. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in as little as five years of study, all while gaining the valuable hands-on experience that comes from co-ops, research, study abroad, and more.

For nutritional science majors, two accelerated pathways enable you to pair the BS degree with a master’s degree to broaden your career opportunities and prepare you for exciting careers in the nutritional sciences field.

  • BS Nutritional Sciences/MS Dietetics and Nutrition: The nutritional sciences BS degree provides a solid foundation in science, nutrition, dietetics education, and the business of nutrition. The dietetics and nutrition MS enhances your knowledge of medical nutrition therapy, research methods, nutrition research, and the delivery of nutrition intervention through advanced level nutrition courses and supervised experiential learning. Upon successful completion of the BS/MS degree, you will be prepared to sit for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credentialing exam and become a graduate-trained Registered Dietician Nutritionist.
  • BS Nutritional Sciences/MS Health and Well-Being Management: The nutritional sciences BS degree provides a strong background in science, nutrition, and an introduction to research methodology and implementation. The health and well-being management MS prepares you for a career in health and well-being management program design, administration, and research. This pairing is an excellent choice if you are interested in pursuing medical or dental school, a health science graduate degree, or doctoral studies in nutrition, health promotion, exercise science, or public health.

Nutritional Sciences as a Pathway to Medical School

Nutrition is a powerful tool in managing health. By making positive nutritional changes to one’s lifestyle, people suffering from a host of medical issues–from obesity, diabetes, kidney ailments, heart disease, and more–can treat and manage them effectively. Diet also plays a powerful role in preventing disease.

In medical school, less than 20 hours of instruction over four years are dedicated to the role of nutrition in medical care. The known impact of lifestyle on chronic diseases highlights the importance of nutrition education for medical professionals. An undergraduate degree in nutritional sciences is an excellent pre-med major. Not only does a nutrition major fulfill the pre-med requirements for course work in biological and physical sciences but it also provides you with the comprehensive nutrition knowledge needed to treat and manage health issues. A background in nutrition, paired with a medical degree or an advanced degree in other health professions, such as nursing, dentistry, and physical or occupational therapy, positions you well for providing comprehensive patient care as a medical professional.

Premedical and Health Professions Advisory Program

With a nutrition degree, students are well prepared to apply to medical school or to graduate programs in the health professions, including nursing, physical and occupational therapy, and more, or for further graduate study in nutritional sciences. Learn more about how RIT’s Premedical and Health Professions Advisory Program can help you become a competitive candidate for admission to graduate programs in the medical and health professions.

What Can You Do With A Nutritional Sciences Degree?

With its grounding in science, nutrition, dietetics education, the business of nutrition, and a foundation of nutrition research methodology, RIT’s nutritional sciences major prepares you for a wide range of career opportunities across all areas of health care, including preparation for graduate programs in medicine and the health sciences.

Careers in Nutrition

RIT’s nutrition major prepares you for careers as a health professional or an administrator of nutrition and health promotion programs. These positions provide guidance to the public on how to use nutrition as a tool to achieve better health, as a preventive measure to stave off disease and health issues, or as a tool in an overall treatment plan that helps maintain health.

Nutritionists and nutrition scientists apply their knowledge to:

  • Guide patients in better utilizing food and nutrition to manage and treat a variety of health issues
  • Help businesses offer employee wellness programs
  • Assist food systems administrators and engineers involved in food innovation and technology
  • Oversee government programs addressing food insecurity and population health issues

Nutrition Certifications and Advanced Degrees

Careers in nutrition are diverse, ranging from health guidance and nutritional counseling, policy development, and communications to social and community services. You can choose to select electives to become eligible to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) credential, a respected qualification in health care education. By earning the dual degree in nutritional sciences and dietetics and nutrition, you are eligible to sit for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credentialing exam.

Professional positions where an expertise in nutrition is paramount are also available in a range of diverse settings, including sports fitness programs, hospitality industry, nutrition writing, federal and school nutrition programs, and more.

A Supportive, Welcoming Nutritional Sciences Community

Two key differences in RIT’s nutritional sciences major is our small program size and our dedicated faculty members. Our major is small by design, but robust in offering elective courses and individualized attention. Faculty members are experts in nutrition education and provide personalized, hands-on guidance to students. You’ll build one-on-one relationships with your professors, who will guide you on course selection, encourage your exploration of different professional endeavors, and advise you on career paths that align with your interests and goals.

You will also benefit from the resources and advantages of being at RIT, a top 100 national university, including:

  • Nationally Ranked Co-op Program: There’s a reason RIT is ranked 5th among top schools for co-op and internship programs by U.S. News & World Report (2024). Our co-op program is designed to provide you with career experience–early and often–in a variety of nutrition and dietetic environments. You’ll gain career experience that sets you apart and that employers look for in their next top hires.
  • Hundreds of Clubs and Student Organizations: Develop your leadership skills, boost your resume, make new friends, and expand your community. With more than 300 clubs to choose from, you’ll find the perfect place to grow and learn. For nutritional science majors a few clubs of interest include the Student Dietetics and Nutrition Association, RIT Vegan Club,, and Global Public Health Association, to name a few.
  • Study Abroad Opportunities: Immerse yourself in a different culture and gain a global perspective on health and nutrition with study abroad for health sciences. Study the Mediterranean Diet in Croatia or childhood anemia in Ghana. Study abroad opportunities are also available at RIT’s global campuses in China, Croatia, Dubai, and Kosovo, or through affiliate programs at other universities.

Student Dietetics and Nutrition Association

The Student Dietetics and Nutrition Association is a student club comprised of nutrition students and supports experiential learning outside of the classroom. The club promotes health and nutrition on campus as well as volunteer opportunities with local organizations. Club activities include volunteering at local food banks and schools, presenting health related information at RIT events, and educational activities for members.

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Careers and Cooperative Education

Typical Job Titles

Health/Nutrition Educator Wellness Coordinator
Nutritionist Health Promotion Coordinator
Nutrition Research Associate Public Health Nutritionist
Nutrition Project Coordinator School Wellness Coordinator

Industries

  • Food and Beverage
  • Health Care
  • Non-Profit
  • Health, Wellness, and Fitness

Cooperative Education

The nutritional sciences major requires two 400-hour cooperative education experiences in a setting related to food and nutrition, or a health discipline related to your future career goals. Co-op is full-time, paid employment in nutrition and health care. The majority of nutritional sciences majors complete their co-ops in the summer. Learn more about cooperative education and its benefits.

Beyond the Classroom: The Rochester Health Care Community

As a nutritional sciences major, the Rochester metropolitan area is a hands-on lab for experience-based learning. Two major health systems–Rochester Regional Health and UR Medicine–call Rochester home. Both provide comprehensive health care services and serve as co-op, internship, and clinical rotation sites for students in RIT’s health sciences majors. In addition, RIT has partnerships with a range of community organizations that expose students to a wide variety of nutrition-related career paths. A selection of the 50+ community partners with whom we collaborate include:

  • Abbott Nutrition
  • American Dairy Association and Dairy Council
  • American Heart Association
  • Food and Drug Administration
  • Foodlink
  • Gates-Chili School District
  • Heritage Christian Services
  • Hillside Family of Agencies
  • Jewish Senior Life
  • Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics
  • Rochester Psychiatric Center
  • Rochester Regional Health
  • UR Medic
  • Wegmans
  • WIC

Featured Work

Featured Profiles

Curriculum for 2023-2024 for Nutritional Sciences BS

Current Students: See Curriculum Requirements

Nutritional Sciences, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-141
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: General & Analytical Chemistry
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-142
General Education –Scientific Principles Perspective: General & Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-145
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMG-146
General Education –Scientific Principles Perspective: General & Analytical Chemistry II Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
HSPT-215
Principles of Food Production and Service
Principles of Food Production and Service is a basic course covering food preparation methods, quality standards, food presentation, professionalism in food preparation and service, sanitation and safety processes in commercial kitchens, kitchen and restaurant organization and roles, and food service styles. Students completing this course should be able to function effectively in a kitchen or restaurant environment; including demonstrating professional appearance and behaviors; and knowledge of food preparation techniques, effective food presentation, food safety and sanitation practices, appropriate service styles, teamwork, and cleanup practices. Students are expected to achieve their required co-curricular requirement – the ServSafe Manager certification – by the end of this course. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall).
3
MATH-101
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: College Algebra
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations. (Prerequisites: Students may not take and receive credit for MATH-101 and MATH-111. See the Math department with any questions.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
NUTR-100
Nutr & Dietetics as a Health Profession
This course is an introduction to the professional roles and responsibilities as a dietitian/nutritionist with emphasis on careers, professional development and conduct. Dietetics practice, including the scope of the practice, the role functions of registered dietitians, and the education requirements for entry into practice will be explored and contrasted with complementary aspects for nutritionists and nutrition educators not credentialed as registered dietitians. The history of the profession of nutrition and dietetics will serve as a background for dietetics practice in today’s changing healthcare arena. Learning activities will consist of lecture, class discussion, assigned readings, and guest presentations by practicing Registered Dietitians and nutritionists. (This course is restricted to NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN students.) Lecture 1 (Spring).
1
NUTR-215
Concepts of Human Nutrition
This is an introductory course in nutritional science concepts and application to current nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Current health and nutrition problems, nutrition misinformation, chronic diseases, performance nutrition, food safety and technology, hunger and global nutrition will be discussed. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
NUTR-499
Cooperative Education Experience (Summer)
Co-op is a work experience (typically full-time and paid) for at least 400 hours in an industry related to food, nutrition and/or healthcare, monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition. Designed for students to gain essential career-related skills and experience. Dietetics and Nutrition students are required to complete three co-ops with at least one co-op in the healthcare environment and one in the food industry. Nutritional Sciences students are required to complete two co-ops. Students typically complete co-ops during the summer. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Transfer students may be granted credit for one co-op based on education and work experience, as determined by the Program Director. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
PSYC-101
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
CHMB-402
Biochemistry I (General Education)
This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-231
Organic Chemistry I
This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-142 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-235 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-235
Organic Chemistry Lab I
This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231. (Corequisite: CHMO-231 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
MEDS-250
Human Anatomy and Physiology I (General Education)
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems. Laboratory exercises include histological examination, actual and simulated anatomical dissections, and physiology experiments with human subjects. (Pre-requisite: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or MEDG-102 or equivalent course or NUTR-BS or NUTRSC-BS students.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).
4
MEDS-251
Human Anatomy and Physiology II (General Education)
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immunological, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems with an emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis. Laboratory exercises include histological examinations, anatomical dissections and physiological experiments using human subjects. (Pre-requisite: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or MEDG-102 or equivalent course or NUTR-BS or NUTRSC-BS students.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
NUTR-499
Cooperative Education Experience (Summer)
Co-op is a work experience (typically full-time and paid) for at least 400 hours in an industry related to food, nutrition and/or healthcare, monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition. Designed for students to gain essential career-related skills and experience. Dietetics and Nutrition students are required to complete three co-ops with at least one co-op in the healthcare environment and one in the food industry. Nutritional Sciences students are required to complete two co-ops. Students typically complete co-ops during the summer. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Transfer students may be granted credit for one co-op based on education and work experience, as determined by the Program Director. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
SOCI-102
Foundations of Sociology (General Education)
Sociology is the study of the social world and socialization processes. Sociologists study the broader picture of how societies are structured and organized through a macro-sociological analysis as well as how individuals create their own social reality symbolically through their interactions with others in a micro-sociological analysis. Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of each approach and come away with a sociological framework which they can critically apply to their own lives. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
STAT-145
General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisites: Any 100 level MATH course, or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or (NMTH-250 with a C- or better) or a Math Placement Exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
 
Major Electives
6
 
Open Elective
3
Third Year
NUTR-333
Nutrition Education for Health Professionals
Nutrition Education for Health Professionals is a 3-credit course focused on the theory and practice of providing nutrition information with specific focus on writing for nutrition communications. This course prepares students to provide effective nutrition education and counseling, and give effective presentations. The course highlights the role of technology in health and nutrition programs and the application of technology in health and nutrition program evaluation. Topics include communications methods, writing skills for the nutrition discipline, learner/ audience analysis, basic learning and behavior theory, developing counseling and training materials, as well as designing, making, and evaluating individual and group presentations using various approaches, including technology applications. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
NUTR-555
Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle
This course emphasizes the interrelationships of social, psychological, physiological, and biochemical factors and their impact on nutrient requirements and recommendations for food intake during specific stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is given to nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, early childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and the elderly. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
Major Electives
12
 
Open Elective
3
Fourth Year
NUTR-510
Integrative Approaches to Health
This class offers students in the Nutrition Management major an overview of controversial and accepted alternative diet therapies, basic medicine guidelines, and vitamin/mineral supplementation. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
1
NUTR-525
Medical Nutrition Therapy I
This course is the first course of a two course series. Review and application of biological metabolism and interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes, and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
NUTR-550
Community Nutrition
Study of current nutrition issues and delivery of food and nutrition services in the community. The course is designed to allow senior level students to acquire skills necessary to deliver services in the public health and private sector markets. (Prerequisite: NUTR-333 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
3
WSHN-560
Health Sciences Research Foundations (WI-PR)
3
 
General Education - Ethical Perspective
3
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
Major Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
124

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Cooperative Education (NUTR-499) in the third year is optional. It is required only if co-op in the first and second year is not completed.

Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees

The curriculum below outlines the typical course sequence(s) for combined accelerated degrees available with this bachelor's degree.

Nutritional Sciences, BS degree/Dietetics and Nutrition, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
BIOL-101
General Biology I (General Education)
This course serves as an introduction to cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and the origin of life and evolutionary patterns of organism development on Earth. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
3
BIOL-102
General Biology II
This course serves as an introduction to animal and plant anatomy and physiology, in addition to the fundamentals of ecology. Topics will include: animal development; animal body systems; plant development; unique plant systems; Earth's terrestrial and aquatic environments; population and community ecology; animal behavior; and conservation biology. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
3
BIOL-103
General Biology I Lab
This course provides laboratory work to complement the lecture material of General Biology I. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular and molecular biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations. (Co-requisites: BIOL-101 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Summer).
1
CHMG-141
General & Analytical Chemistry I (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II (General Education- Scientific Principles Perspectives)
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMG-146
General & Analytical Chemistry II Lab (General Education)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
ECON-101
Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
HSPT-215
Principles of Food Production and Service
Principles of Food Production and Service is a basic course covering food preparation methods, quality standards, food presentation, professionalism in food preparation and service, sanitation and safety processes in commercial kitchens, kitchen and restaurant organization and roles, and food service styles. Students completing this course should be able to function effectively in a kitchen or restaurant environment; including demonstrating professional appearance and behaviors; and knowledge of food preparation techniques, effective food presentation, food safety and sanitation practices, appropriate service styles, teamwork, and cleanup practices. Students are expected to achieve their required co-curricular requirement – the ServSafe Manager certification – by the end of this course. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall).
3
MATH-101
College Algebra (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations. (Prerequisites: Students may not take and receive credit for MATH-101 and MATH-111. See the Math department with any questions.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
NUTR-100
Nutr & Dietetics as a Health Profession
This course is an introduction to the professional roles and responsibilities as a dietitian/nutritionist with emphasis on careers, professional development and conduct. Dietetics practice, including the scope of the practice, the role functions of registered dietitians, and the education requirements for entry into practice will be explored and contrasted with complementary aspects for nutritionists and nutrition educators not credentialed as registered dietitians. The history of the profession of nutrition and dietetics will serve as a background for dietetics practice in today’s changing healthcare arena. Learning activities will consist of lecture, class discussion, assigned readings, and guest presentations by practicing Registered Dietitians and nutritionists. (This course is restricted to NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN students.) Lecture 1 (Spring).
1
NUTR-215
Foundations of Nutrition Sciences
This is an introductory course in nutritional science concepts and application to current nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Current health and nutrition problems, nutrition misinformation, chronic diseases, performance nutrition, food safety and technology, hunger and global nutrition will be discussed. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
NUTR-499
Cooperative Education Experience (Summer)
Co-op is a work experience (typically full-time and paid) for at least 400 hours in an industry related to food, nutrition and/or healthcare, monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition. Designed for students to gain essential career-related skills and experience. Dietetics and Nutrition students are required to complete three co-ops with at least one co-op in the healthcare environment and one in the food industry. Nutritional Sciences students are required to complete two co-ops. Students typically complete co-ops during the summer. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Transfer students may be granted credit for one co-op based on education and work experience, as determined by the Program Director. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
PSYC-101
Introduction to Psychology (General Education)
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
ACCT-110
Financial Accounting
An introduction to the way in which corporations report their financial performance to interested stakeholders such as investors and creditors. Coverage of the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMB-402
Biochemistry I
This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-231
Organic Chemistry I
This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-142 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-235 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-235
Organic Chemistry Lab I
This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231. (Corequisite: CHMO-231 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
MEDS-250
Human Anatomy and Physiology I (General Education)
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems. Laboratory exercises include histological examination, actual and simulated anatomical dissections, and physiology experiments with human subjects. (Pre-requisite: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or MEDG-102 or equivalent course or NUTR-BS or NUTRSC-BS students.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).
4
MEDS-251
Human Anatomy and Physiology II (General Education)
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immunological, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems with an emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis. Laboratory exercises include histological examinations, anatomical dissections and physiological experiments using human subjects. (Pre-requisite: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or MEDG-102 or equivalent course or NUTR-BS or NUTRSC-BS students.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
MGMT-215
Organizational Behavior
As an introductory course in managing and leading organizations, this course provides an overview of human behavior in organizations at the individual, group, and organizational level with an emphasis on enhancing organizational effectiveness. Topics include: individual differences, work teams, motivation, communication, leadership, conflict resolution, organizational culture, and organizational change. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
NUTR-499
Cooperative Education Experience (Summer)
Co-op is a work experience (typically full-time and paid) for at least 400 hours in an industry related to food, nutrition and/or healthcare, monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition. Designed for students to gain essential career-related skills and experience. Dietetics and Nutrition students are required to complete three co-ops with at least one co-op in the healthcare environment and one in the food industry. Nutritional Sciences students are required to complete two co-ops. Students typically complete co-ops during the summer. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Transfer students may be granted credit for one co-op based on education and work experience, as determined by the Program Director. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
 
Open Elective
6
Third Year
HRDE-380
Human Resource Management
Human resources within an organization provide value added dimensions to the organization, which in turn influence the larger society within which the organization exists. The management of those human resources is a critical function within any organization. The goal of the human resource management (HRM) department is to attract qualified employees, manage systems that meet their needs and establish policies and protocols to retain and promote employee engagement. This effort develops a workforce that can meet the organizational strategic goals for growth and continued relevance in the world of work. This course provides an overview of HRM and the context within which HRM functions in organizations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
HSPT-325
Food Innovation Development
Students will explore their creativity through instructor- and student-planned food experiments involving sensory and objective evaluation of food quality, recipe development, problem-solving, experimental design, and written and oral communication of research. Individual research projects focus on assessing new ingredients or technologies, creating new products, and/or evaluating the marketability of a new product. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** (Prerequisite: HSPT-121 or HSPT-215 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
3
HSPT-375
Customer Experience Management
The overall objectives of this course are twofold. This course first examines the development, management, and improvement of service delivery systems used by service organizations (i.e., hotels, restaurants, travel agencies, and health care) on the supply side through the lens of quality management. Secondly, the course examines customer requirements on the demand side by focusing upon how customer experience design shapes customers’ thoughts, actions, and decision processes. Students will learn techniques used for diagnosis, measurement, and continuous improvement of successful customer experience. There are three major sections in this course. Section 1 focuses on understanding the paradigm of customer experience, identifying the drivers of customer satisfaction, formulating strategies to optimize the customer experience, and managing service operations through the development of a service blueprint. Section 2 focuses on the role of exponential technologies, such as artificial intelligence, robotics, augmented reality, virtual reality, and data analytics, in creating exceptional customer experiences. Section 3 discusses the creation of exceptional luxury customer experiences, incorporating technology, and describing how brands go beyond traditional branding frameworks to create luxury experiences. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MEDG-106
Microbiology of Health and Disease
An introductory course in microbiology including its history, significant contributions to medicine and history, as well as a survey of microbiological organisms as they relate to disease, industry and biotechnology. (any course in Biology) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
NUTR-333
Nutrition Education for Health Professionals (WI)
Nutrition Education for Health Professionals is a 3-credit course focused on the theory and practice of providing nutrition information with specific focus on writing for nutrition communications. This course prepares students to provide effective nutrition education and counseling, and give effective presentations. The course highlights the role of technology in health and nutrition programs and the application of technology in health and nutrition program evaluation. Topics include communications methods, writing skills for the nutrition discipline, learner/ audience analysis, basic learning and behavior theory, developing counseling and training materials, as well as designing, making, and evaluating individual and group presentations using various approaches, including technology applications. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
NUTR-510
Integrative Approaches to Health
This class offers students in the Nutrition Management major an overview of controversial and accepted alternative diet therapies, basic medicine guidelines, and vitamin/mineral supplementation. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
1
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics I (General Education - Mathematical Perspective B)
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisites: Any 100 level MATH course, or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or (NMTH-250 with a C- or better) or a Math Placement Exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2,3
6
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education - Social Perspective
3
 
Open Elective
7
Fourth Year
NUTR-550
Community Nutrition
Study of current nutrition issues and delivery of food and nutrition services in the community. The course is designed to allow senior level students to acquire skills necessary to deliver services in the public health and private sector markets. (Prerequisite: NUTR-333 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
3
NUTR-625
Medical Nutrition Therapy I
This course is the first of a two-course series concerned with the review and application of biological metabolism and the interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes, and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as the use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
NUTR-626
Medical Nutrition Therapy II
This course is the second of a two-course series concerned with the review and application of biological metabolism and the interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes, and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as the use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. (Prerequisite: NUTR-625 or equivalent course.NUTR-625 Prereq) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
NUTR-655
Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle
This course emphasizes the interrelationships of social, psychological, physiological, and biochemical factors and their impact on nutrient requirements and recommendations for food intake during specific stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is given to nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, early childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and the elderly. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
WSHN-624
Advanced Nutrition Science
This course offers an in-depth exposure to macro and micronutrient metabolism and biochemistry in humans. Nutrient structure, function, and physiological regulations of digestion, absorption, and interactions are examined with translational concepts for conditions of health and disease. This integrated perspective of nutrient metabolism prepares students for advanced study of medical nutrition therapy. Lecture 3 (Summer).
3
WSHN-700
Research Methods in Health and Well-being
Research Methods in Health and Well-being addresses requisite foundational skills to conduct rigorous, robust, and ethical research into problems related to health, nutrition and well-being. Evidence-based and translational research issues are presented in tandem with design of research studies, measurement approaches, funding opportunities, and research management considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
WSHN-710
Health Risk Identification and Management
Introduces population health with focus on the social determinants of health. Engages students in the concept of risk as an epidemiologic concept and the application of epidemiology to population health surveillance, population health risk assessment. Students will have the opportunity to explore the intersection of population health with public policy, and evaluate how determinants of health, epidemiological findings, health disparities, political interest, availability of resources, and accessibility influence the health and well-being of a community and population. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
WSHN-715
Food Systems Management
Food supply concepts are integrated with principles and practices to manage food service and culinary operations of all sizes. Topics include food safety and allergen training, food production, inventory control, menu planning, food systems sustainability, fiscal management, technology application, human resource development, marketing. Addresses food systems requirements for dietetics and nutrition pathway of the nutritional sciences degree. Prepares student for supervised experiential learning in culinary and food systems management. (Co-requisites: WSHN-775 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
3
WSHN-770
Community and Public Health Supervised Experiential Learning
Implementation of community nutrition and public health concepts in experiential learning sites. Skill development opportunities for practice as a dietitian/nutritionist related to community and public health nutrition including nutrition policy, needs assessment, legislation and advocacy, education and interpersonal communication, and ethical approaches to food and nutrition problems. (Prerequisites: NUTR-550 and NUTR-625 and WSHN-700 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: WSHN-710 or equivalent course.) Internship 9 (Spring).
3
WSHN-775
Culinary and Food Systems Management Supervised Experiential Learning
Implementation of culinary and food systems management skills and concepts in one or more supervised experiential learning sites. Addresses food systems management requirements for dietetics and nutrition. (Co-requisites: WSHN-715 or equivalent course.) Internship 9 (Summer).
3
 
Graduate Program Elective
3
Fifth Year
HLTH-746
Leading Health Systems II
This is the second of three courses in the MHSA program that require students to be on campus. These “immersion” courses will be scheduled over a long weekend and will entail full days on campuses well as pre- and post-course work completed online. The concept is to immerse students in a series of experiences to support their development as high function managers and leaders within the health care industry. This course builds on the first Leading Health Care Systems course and provides a in-depth examination of advanced management and leadership knowledge, skills and values required of contemporary leaders within health care systems. (Prerequisites: HLTH-706 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
3
WSHN-702
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being applies constructs practices, and values of dissemination and implementation sciences to health and well-being education activities. Strategies to foster translation of evidence-based practices to standard practice in public and private programs are applied in an experiential learning format. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
WSHN-730
Nutritional Assessment and Counseling
Fundamental principles and techniques of the art and science of nutritional assessment and counseling are developed in this active learning course. Newly acquired skills are utilized in experiences with case studies, simulation mannequins, and volunteers. Digital and technology-driven tools and experiences are incorporated into nutrition assessment and counseling instruction and experiences. In tandem with Medical Nutrition Therapy, this course prepares the student for clinical supervised experiential learning in healthcare settings. (Prerequisite: NUTR-626 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
WSHN-780
Clinical Nutrition Supervised Experiential Learning
Supervised experiential learning at healthcare facilities to attain competency and meet performance requirements in medical clinical dietetics and nutrition therapy. (Prerequisites: WSHN-624 and NUTR-625 and NUTR-626 and NUTR-655 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: WSHN-720 or equivalent course.) Internship 18 (Spring).
6
WSHN-790
Health & Well-being Management Thesis
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of thesis adviser. Components include review of literature, definition of research aims, data collection and analysis, interpretation and discussion of findings, preparation of written paper following specified guidelines and standards, and oral defense of thesis. Enrollment for 6 credits in one semester or as necessary over multiple semesters for a total of 6 credits. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or thesis advisor approval or equivalent course.) Thesis 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
6
 
Statistics Elective�
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
165

 

Nutritional Sciences, BS degree/Health and Well-being Management, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMO-231
Organic Chemistry I (General Education)
This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-142 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-235 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-235
Organic Chemistry Lab I (General Education)
This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231. (Corequisite: CHMO-231 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
HSPT-215
Principles of Food Production and Service
Principles of Food Production and Service is a basic course covering food preparation methods, quality standards, food presentation, professionalism in food preparation and service, sanitation and safety processes in commercial kitchens, kitchen and restaurant organization and roles, and food service styles. Students completing this course should be able to function effectively in a kitchen or restaurant environment; including demonstrating professional appearance and behaviors; and knowledge of food preparation techniques, effective food presentation, food safety and sanitation practices, appropriate service styles, teamwork, and cleanup practices. Students are expected to achieve their required co-curricular requirement – the ServSafe Manager certification – by the end of this course. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall).
3
MATH-101
College Algebra (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations. (Prerequisites: Students may not take and receive credit for MATH-101 and MATH-111. See the Math department with any questions.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
NUTR-100
Nutr & Dietetics as a Health Profession
This course is an introduction to the professional roles and responsibilities as a dietitian/nutritionist with emphasis on careers, professional development and conduct. Dietetics practice, including the scope of the practice, the role functions of registered dietitians, and the education requirements for entry into practice will be explored and contrasted with complementary aspects for nutritionists and nutrition educators not credentialed as registered dietitians. The history of the profession of nutrition and dietetics will serve as a background for dietetics practice in today’s changing healthcare arena. Learning activities will consist of lecture, class discussion, assigned readings, and guest presentations by practicing Registered Dietitians and nutritionists. (This course is restricted to NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN students.) Lecture 1 (Spring).
1
NUTR-215
Foundations of Nutritional Science
This is an introductory course in nutritional science concepts and application to current nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Current health and nutrition problems, nutrition misinformation, chronic diseases, performance nutrition, food safety and technology, hunger and global nutrition will be discussed. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
NUTR-499
Cooperative Education Experience
Co-op is a work experience (typically full-time and paid) for at least 400 hours in an industry related to food, nutrition and/or healthcare, monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition. Designed for students to gain essential career-related skills and experience. Dietetics and Nutrition students are required to complete three co-ops with at least one co-op in the healthcare environment and one in the food industry. Nutritional Sciences students are required to complete two co-ops. Students typically complete co-ops during the summer. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Transfer students may be granted credit for one co-op based on education and work experience, as determined by the Program Director. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
PSYC-101
Introduction to Psychology (General Education)
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education - Elective
3
 
General Education - Social Perspective
3
 
General Education - Scientific Principles Perspective
3
Second Year
CHMB-402
Biochemistry I
This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MEDS-250
Human Anatomy and Physiology I (General Education)
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems. Laboratory exercises include histological examination, actual and simulated anatomical dissections, and physiology experiments with human subjects. (Pre-requisite: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or MEDG-102 or equivalent course or NUTR-BS or NUTRSC-BS students.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).
4
MEDS-251
Human Anatomy and Physiology II (General Education)
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immunological, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems with an emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis. Laboratory exercises include histological examinations, anatomical dissections and physiological experiments using human subjects. (Pre-requisite: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or MEDG-102 or equivalent course or NUTR-BS or NUTRSC-BS students.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
NUTR-499
Cooperative Education Experience
Co-op is a work experience (typically full-time and paid) for at least 400 hours in an industry related to food, nutrition and/or healthcare, monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition. Designed for students to gain essential career-related skills and experience. Dietetics and Nutrition students are required to complete three co-ops with at least one co-op in the healthcare environment and one in the food industry. Nutritional Sciences students are required to complete two co-ops. Students typically complete co-ops during the summer. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Transfer students may be granted credit for one co-op based on education and work experience, as determined by the Program Director. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
SOCI-102
Foundations of Sociology
Sociology is the study of the social world and socialization processes. Sociologists study the broader picture of how societies are structured and organized through a macro-sociological analysis as well as how individuals create their own social reality symbolically through their interactions with others in a micro-sociological analysis. Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of each approach and come away with a sociological framework which they can critically apply to their own lives. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisites: Any 100 level MATH course, or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or (NMTH-250 with a C- or better) or a Math Placement Exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Immersion
3
 
Open Elective
3
 
Major Electives - Undergraduate
6
Third Year
NUTR-333
Nutrition Education for Health Professionals (WI)
Nutrition Education for Health Professionals is a 3-credit course focused on the theory and practice of providing nutrition information with specific focus on writing for nutrition communications. This course prepares students to provide effective nutrition education and counseling, and give effective presentations. The course highlights the role of technology in health and nutrition programs and the application of technology in health and nutrition program evaluation. Topics include communications methods, writing skills for the nutrition discipline, learner/ audience analysis, basic learning and behavior theory, developing counseling and training materials, as well as designing, making, and evaluating individual and group presentations using various approaches, including technology applications. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
NUTR-555
Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle
This course emphasizes the interrelationships of social, psychological, physiological, and biochemical factors and their impact on nutrient requirements and recommendations for food intake during specific stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is given to nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, early childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and the elderly. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion
3
 
Major Electives - Undergraduate
12
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education - Artistic Perspective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Fourth Year
NUTR-510
Integrative Approaches to Health
This class offers students in the Nutrition Management major an overview of controversial and accepted alternative diet therapies, basic medicine guidelines, and vitamin/mineral supplementation. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
1
NUTR-525
Medical Nutrition Therapy I
This course is the first course of a two course series. Review and application of biological metabolism and interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes, and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
NUTR-560
Health and Nutrition Research Foundations (WI-PR)
This course offers students the opportunity to learn basic research principles and integrate with skills and knowledge from other courses to conduct research in an area of professional interest. The research project includes gathering primary data, assessing and summarizing the data, and sense-making or drawing conclusions from the data. Students will complete activities to gain skills in project management, secondary research development, and Human Subject Research (HSRO) submission and meet RIT’s Writing-Intensive-Program requirement. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
NUTR-650
Community Nutrition*
Study of current nutrition issues and delivery of food and nutrition services in the community. The course is designed to allow senior level and graduate students to acquire skills necessary to deliver services in the public health and private sector markets. Individual practicum in community facility is required and arranged by the instructor. (Prerequisite: NUTR-625 or equivalent course.NUTR-625 Prereq) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
 
General Education - Elective
3
 
General Education - Immersion
3
 
Open Electives
6
 
Major Elective - Undergraduate
3
 
Major Elective - Graduate Elective*
3
Fifth Year
WSHN-700
Research Methods in Health and Well-being
Research Methods in Health and Well-being addresses requisite foundational skills to conduct rigorous, robust, and ethical research into problems related to health, nutrition and well-being. Evidence-based and translational research issues are presented in tandem with design of research studies, measurement approaches, funding opportunities, and research management considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
WSHN-701
Health and Nutrition Education and Evaluation
In Health and Nutrition Education and Evaluation, content and research expertise are applied to design effective, theory-based health and nutrition education and establish it as evidence-based. Needs assessment, behavior change models, theories of motivation, and learning styles are presented in the context of planning health and nutrition education and sampling, recruitment, participant retention, instrument development, and data analysis to foster development of evaluation expertise. (Co-requisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
WSHN-702
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being applies constructs practices, and values of dissemination and implementation sciences to health and well-being education activities. Strategies to foster translation of evidence-based practices to standard practice in public and private programs are applied in an experiential learning format. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Choose one of the following:
WSHN-797
Health & Well-being Management Project
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of a project adviser. Preparation of a Project Report following specified guidelines and standards, and oral presentation of the key report components. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or project advisor approval or equivalent course.) Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
WSHN-790
Health & Well-being Management Thesis
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of thesis adviser. Components include review of literature, definition of research aims, data collection and analysis, interpretation and discussion of findings, preparation of written paper following specified guidelines and standards, and oral defense of thesis. Enrollment for 6 credits in one semester or as necessary over multiple semesters for a total of 6 credits. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or thesis advisor approval or equivalent course.) Thesis 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
Choose one of the following:
HLTH-710
Health Care Economics and Policy
This course provides an examination of the roles and responsibilities of policy makers on the health care system and the resulting economic impact of their policies. Students will compare and contrast the regulatory functions of varying levels of government, the political process and economic impacts as they relate to health care systems as well as examine control issues, economic functions and regulatory trends in the United States. In addition, an assessment will be made of national health systems and national health policies of other countries as they compare to the United States. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
WSHN-710
Population Health, Risk, and Identification Management
Introduces population health with focus on the social determinants of health. Engages students in the concept of risk as an epidemiologic concept and the application of epidemiology to population health surveillance, population health risk assessment. Students will have the opportunity to explore the intersection of population health with public policy, and evaluate how determinants of health, epidemiological findings, health disparities, political interest, availability of resources, and accessibility influence the health and well-being of a community and population. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
6
 
Choose one of the following:
WSHN-790
Health & Well-being Management Thesis
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of thesis adviser. Components include review of literature, definition of research aims, data collection and analysis, interpretation and discussion of findings, preparation of written paper following specified guidelines and standards, and oral defense of thesis. Enrollment for 6 credits in one semester or as necessary over multiple semesters for a total of 6 credits. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or thesis advisor approval or equivalent course.) Thesis 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
Graduate Elective
3
 
Statistics Elective
3
 
Graduate Elective
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Statistics Elective can be fulfilled with either STAT-614, MATH-655, or PSYC-640.

Admissions and Financial Aid

This program is STEM designated when studying on campus and full time.

First-Year Admission

A strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. This includes:

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of social studies and/or history
  • 3 years of math is required and must include algebra, geometry, and algebra 2/trigonometry. Pre-calculus is preferred.
  • 2-3 years of science. Biology and chemistry are required.

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree
Courses in liberal arts, sciences, and math. Science courses required for nutritional sciences major.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer
Dietetics or nutrition, food service management, or liberal arts

Please note: The nutritional sciences program has articulation agreements with the following institutions:

Learn more about transferring credits and additional information about transferring to RIT by visiting the Transfer Admissions website.

Learn How to Apply

Financial Aid and Scholarships

100% of all incoming first-year and transfer students receive aid.

RIT’s personalized and comprehensive financial aid program includes scholarships, grants, loans, and campus employment programs. When all these are put to work, your actual cost may be much lower than the published estimated cost of attendance.
Learn more about financial aid and scholarships

Research

The Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition is dedicated to researching and identifying solutions to some of today’s most critical health issues–from obesity and sedentary lifestyles to smoking and other risk behaviors. The school is always seeking new ways to influence and advance the fields of health and nutrition through practical solutions that positively impact individuals and community health. Learn more about nutritional sciences research and the ways you can become a part of investigating and solving critical health and nutrition issues through undergraduate research opportunities in the Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition.

Facilities

  • Three students and a faculty member working on laptops around a table.
    NEEDs Lab

    The mission of the Nutrition Education, Engineering, and Designs (NEEDs) lab is to engineer and design research and evaluation services that foster promotion and delivery of evidence-based health and nutrition education.

  • 3 students using a stethoscope on a dummy patient and a monitor with data readouts
    Simulation Lab

    The Simulation Laboratory consists of three parts a patient room that contains a simulation mannequin, a control room where operation of the mannequin occurs, and a debriefing room where faculty interact with students after simulated medical scenarios end.

  • Student engaged in virtual reality boxing.
    Human Movement Lab

    The Human Movement Lab houses state-of-the-art equipment utilized by exercise science students to gain hands-on experience conducting fitness assessments and testing.

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