Global Public Health Minor

Overview

The global public health minor enhances your understanding of the important concepts of public health and its focus on prevention and population-based approaches to enhancing health for all people. An overriding goal of the minor will be to ensure that you understand the various determinants of health and how health care professionals can strive to ensure all people, everywhere, have what they need to reach their full potential. You will learn how to apply the knowledge obtained in this minor to local, regional, national, and global health concerns.

Notes about this minor:

  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
  • Notations may appear in the curriculum chart below outlining pre-requisites, co-requisites, and other curriculum requirements (see footnotes).

The plan code for Global Public Health Minor is GLPH-MN.

Curriculum for Global Public Health Minor

Course
Required Courses
GLPH-101
Introduction to Public Health
This course provides an introduction to the foundational concepts of public health including the definition and history of public health, as well as the role of and strategies utilized by the public health workforce when confronting population-based health issues. Lecture 3 (Fall).
MEDS-355
Introduction to Global Health
This introductory course will evaluate the modern challenges of global health from a multidisciplinary perspective. The key concepts of global health will be discussed, including various health determinants, human rights, healthcare systems, culture’s impact on health, environmental concerns, nutrition, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, women’s health issues, child and adolescent health, injuries, natural disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, poverty’s impact on health and more. Students will be expected to be active learners, lead classroom activities on certain days as part of group research project presentations, and actively participate in discussions. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
Electives
Choose three of the following:
   ANTH-295
   Global Public Health
Global health is a term that reflects a complex series of problems, policies, institutions and aspirations that have only recently made their way to the global stage. From its earliest days, global health was guided by principles in public health that situate the nation-state as responsible for the health of its population. While international health and tropical medicine, the precursors to global health, was driven by the distinction between wealthy and poor nations, global health today, as this course explores, is oriented to the unequal burden of disease around the world. The course will consider major global health challenges, programs, and policies through an integrated social science lens. After placing global health in historical context, we will focus on how the science of disease cannot be dissociated from the social context and policies that both drive the emergence of disease(s) and respond to the unequal burden of disease around the world. We will analyze current and emerging global health priorities, including emerging infectious diseases, poverty, conflicts and emergencies, health inequity, health systems reforms, and major global initiatives for disease prevention and health promotion. Lecture 3 (Annual).
   ANTH-341
   Global Addictions
This course evaluates global forms of “addiction” in medical, cultural, national, and transnational situations of encounter. Though primarily a EuroAmerican concept of illness, addiction is now discursively and experientially widespread, assuming the status of a “global form.” Addiction narratives and experiences shape people and social life everywhere, as scientific and cultural or national knowledge intersect to form subjectivities, identities of addicts, and communities of addicted bodies. Concepts of will, morality, the addicted self and other, and living and dying also impact the cultural, national and international infrastructures we build—whether and how, for instance, we put resources into medical or criminal justice systems and networks. A closer look at the intimate lives of addicts thus enables us to consider identity boundaries and crossings; addiction languages; family relations and parenting; self-made communities and social bonds; work at the economic fringes of society; personal and institutional violence; policing and navigating enforcement or incarceration; homelessness and legal, medical and social service bureaucracies; as well as transnational production, trafficking, forms of addiction, and policing. By the end of the course, students will comprehend concepts and theories of addiction, and global perspectives on people living with addiction. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   COMM-344
   Health Communication
An introduction to the subject of communication in health care delivery and in public health campaigns, with an emphasis on interpersonal, organizational, and mass communication approaches. Also covered is the interrelationship of health behavior and communication. Lecture 3 (Spring).
   DCHP-301
   Spirituality, Religion & Medicine
This course will explore the relationships between spirituality, religion, and medicine as these influence and impact health, well-being, illness, and patient care. The course will provide students with a broad exposure to various dimensions of health, an overview of religion and spirituality, the interface between family, illness, and cultural competence and how current research guides this discussion. An introduction of various religious affiliations and belief systems will be presented as they relate to individual health, well-being, and illness. Strategies for incorporating and integrating religion and spirituality into medicine will be reviewed. Discussions will also include the benefits, barriers, challenges and medical ethics surrounding these strategies and initiatives using real-world case studies and examples. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   HLTH-320
   Legal Aspects of Health Care
This course provides an overview of statues and regulations as they apply to the health care system. Topics include: an overview of the American legal system; licensure of institutions; licensure and discipline of practitioners; physician-patient relationship; reproductive issues; the right to die; organ donations; medical records; legal liability; malpractice; and labor law. Lecture 3 (Spring).
   HLTH-325
   Health Care Leadership
Highly trained clinical and administrative professionals drive the nature of work in health care. The purpose of this course is to provide students the opportunity to study leadership theory as it is applied in health care organizations. Leadership theories and applications geared toward professionals working in health service organizations will be emphasized. Students will learn to apply leadership theories via case studies and issue analysis of their active work environments. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   HLTH-328
   Finance for Health Care Professionals
This is an overview course that will provide an in-depth investigation of the financial workings in the health care industry. The course will be presented through the investigation of the operations of various health care settings – hospitals, physician practices, long term care facilities and home health care providers. The course covers all the essential functions in health care internal financial operations that would be experienced throughout the industry, except for the insurance companies. There are several examples involving physician practices, inpatient hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, etc. During the course the participants will carefully evaluate what the finance department is expected to accomplish. They will better understand the role of the clinical operations manager in the financial health of a health care organization. The course is designed to provide an approach that includes some terminology used in accounting, but more so those terms associated with finance. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   HLTH-330
   Health Planning and Program Development
This course provides a review of the methodology of planning effectively for health care services. The use of data systems and the methods of forecasting, identifying, and analyzing problems are explored. The course will all address the process of strategic planning, setting priorities, developing projects and allocating resources. Students prepare actual application for new programs to regulatory agencies. Lecture 3 (Spring).
   HLTH-508
   Integrated Health Systems & Population Health
This course discusses the delivery system of health care in the US. Specifically, the course will review the current status of American health care including research into population demographics and health and the concept of wellness and prevention. Following this a review of international health care models will occur to consider best practice as alternative care models for consideration for the US. In addition, the students will develop, for their area of interest and expertise, a strategy for incremental or radical innovation in how we provide health care to our constituents. (A minimum of 3rd year standing is required to enroll.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   HLTH-510
   Global Health Systems
This course will evaluate the modern challenges of global health from a multidisciplinary perspective. The key concepts of global health will be discussed, including various health determinants, human rights, health care systems, culture’s impact on health, environmental concerns, nutrition, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, women’s health issues, child and adolescent health, injuries, natural disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, poverty’s impact on health and more. Students will be expected to be active learners, leading classroom activities on certain days as part of group research project presentations, and actively participate in discussions. (A minimum of 3rd year standing is required to enroll.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   HLTH-511
   Emergency Management in Health Care
The purpose of this course is to describe the fundamental attributes of emergency management to provide students with a foundation of understanding of the field, while also providing students with a basic understanding of how public health, medical, and health care services function as a part of disaster and emergency management. This course provides an introduction to emergency management and the role the health care organizations (public health, medicine, etc.) play in in the four phases of emergency management (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery) and its core functions. Students will learn how to apply the core functions of emergency management in health-related disasters and other emergencies to identify solutions and methods to improve emergency management practice. (Prerequisites: HLTH-508 and HLTH-512 or equivalent courses and at least 3rd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
   HLTH-512
   Cultural Competency in Global Health
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization are two of many health organizations that have emphasized the importance of cultural competence in health care. As our society becomes more global, sensitivity to and respect for various cultural norms is an integral component of health care delivery. This course defines cultural competency both in theory and in practice. Select topics to be addressed include: Introduction to cultural competency; diversity, equity and inclusion; how cultural competency impacts health practice; health disparity; language and communication; culture and health literacy; cultural competency; strategies for cultural competency assessment; practicing cultural competency, etc. (Prerequisites: HLTH-508 or equivalent course and at least 3rd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
   HLTH-521
   Leadership in Global Public Health
   MEDS-402
   Biomedical Ethics (WI)
This course will explore key ethical principles, guidelines and regulations that inform decision making and best practices in biomedical research, public health and clinical medicine including issues of informed consent, experimental design, acceptable risk, research integrity, medical errors, for-profit medicine, refusal of care, end-of-life decisions, physician assisted death, substance abuse and ethical use of animals in research. Students will also have multiple opportunities to further develop critical thinking and effective professional communication skills in a seminar format. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102) and (UWRT-150 or ENGL-150 or ISTE-110) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   NUTR-215
   Foundations of Nutrition Sciences
This is an introductory course in nutritional science concepts and application to current nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Students learn to analyze their own diets and develop strategies to make any necessary dietary changes for a lifetime of good health. Current health and nutrition problems and nutrition misinformation will be discussed. Online sections are asynchronous. Students are assessed by learning activities such as: weekly quizzes and discussion boards, homework assignments, and a final diet analysis project. In person sections are synchronous lectures and class discussions. Students are assessed by learning activities such as: exams, homework, assignments and final project analysis. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   NUTR-560
   Health and Nutrition Research Foundations (WI)
This course offers students the opportunity to learn basic research principles and integrate with skills and knowledge from other courses to conduct research in an area of professional interest. The research project includes gathering primary data, assessing and summarizing the data, and sense-making or drawing conclusions from the data. Students will complete activities to gain skills in project management, secondary research development, and Human Subject Research (HSRO) submission and meet RIT’s Writing-Intensive-Program requirement. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   NUTR-580
   Global Food and Nutrition Perspectives
This course provides an overview of global food and nutrition concepts and issues from both developed and developing country perspectives. Topics include breastfeeding, macronutrients and micronutrient problems, food security and access, food emergencies, maternal and child health and the impacts of socio-economic disparities on nutrition status. Also addressed are challenges in food and nutrition policy development, program design and implementation that are unique to global efforts and sustainable development goals (SDGs). Students apply course content and analytical thinking skills to a unique self-selected country and develop dissemination skills by informing others of the unique food, nutrition and health issues. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   PSYC-241
   Health Psychology
A majority of serious diseases today are caused by or exacerbated by behavior and many are preventable. This course provides an introduction to the role of behavior in health. Students will learn about the role of psychology in studying and promoting good health behaviors. Topics include the impact of stress and coping on health, psychological variables related to chronic disease, drug addiction, promoting healthy behavior (e.g. exercise, diet, sleep, sexual health), positive psychology, pain management, critical thinking about health product and alternative medicine claims, and research approaches in health psychology. Students who might elect to take this course include students majoring in related fields who wish to learn more about health behavior (e.g. healthcare technology), students majoring, minoring, or immersing in Psychology, and students looking for a Liberal Arts Elective. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   PUBL-101
   Foundations of Public Policy
This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to the key concepts of public policy, the policymaking process, the role of stakeholders and interest groups, and the basic dimensions policy analysis. Those concepts are then applied through a range of issues, such as the environment, clean energy, climate change, healthcare, cybersecurity, employment, privacy, telecommunications, and innovation, at local, state, federal and international levels. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   SOCI-295
   Global Public Health
Global health is a term that reflects a complex series of problems, policies, institutions and aspirations that have only recently made their way to the global stage. From its earliest days, global health was guided by principles in public health that situate the nation-state as responsible for the health of its population. While international health and tropical medicine, the precursors to global health, was driven by the distinction between wealthy and poor nations, global health today, as this course explores, is oriented to the unequal burden of disease around the world. The course will consider major global health challenges, programs, and policies through an integrated social science lens. After placing global health in historical context, we will focus on how the science of disease cannot be dissociated from the social context and policies that both drive the emergence of disease(s) and respond to the unequal burden of disease around the world. We will analyze current and emerging global health priorities, including emerging infectious diseases, poverty, conflicts and emergencies, health inequity, health systems reforms, and major global initiatives for disease prevention and health promotion. Lecture 3 (Annual).
   STSO-120
   Introduction to Environmental Studies
This course explores the human condition within an environmental context by emphasizing critical environmental problems facing humans on both a global and regional scale. The approach will be interdisciplinary. The issues, their causes, and their potential solutions will be analyzed with respect to ethical, social, historical, political, scientific, and technological factors. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).