Health and Well-being Management Master of science degree

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Overview

A health management master's degree that prepares you for a career in designing and managing health and well-being programs for organizations interested in helping their people lead healthier lives and contribute to the organization's productivity.


Individual and community health, disease prevention, and engaging in healthful habits to promote well-being are at the fore-front of public interest. Well-being is a mosaic of nutrition, physical activity, stress management, and environmental features that are critical for a productive, efficient, and healthy society. Corporations, small businesses, government agencies, and institutions are employing health and well-being professionals to help people lead healthier lives and contribute to corporate, agency, and business productivity.

The MS in health and well-being management prepares you for a career in health and well-being program design, administration, and research and is the perfect choice for those interested in going to medical or dental school or pursing doctoral studies in nutrition, health promotion, exercise science, or public health.

To provide high-quality, population-based health care, the future health care workforce needs a skill set that includes the ability to:

  • apply systems thinking,
  • design interventions,
  • practice dissemination and implementation science,
  • engage with communities, and
  • understand and utilize team dynamics, negotiation, and advocacy skills.

The health and well-being management program offers evidence-informed guidance to develop and apply these skills.

Two Options

The MS in health and well-being management offers two emphasis options, both of which prepare you for a career in health and well-being as well as offer research experiences for those interested in pursuing further doctoral and post-graduate studies.

Content development, implementation, and evaluation focuses on helping students learn how to design and execute health and well-being programs, focusing on development of content and expertise in a particular area of health or wellness, such as exercise, behavior, and nutrition.

Health and well-being program management relates to leading an organization’s health and wellness program or an employee assistance program within corporate setting or in self-employment venues.


Educational outcomes

  1. Demonstrate skills in the design, delivery, and evaluation of individual and group interventions/programs that are consistent with evidence based social and behavioral theories.

    You will learn health education and program evaluation concepts, examine evidence and research-based content and apply learning behavior theory constructs to health and well-being activities.
     
  2. Demonstrate the ability to assist with health, physical, nutrition, behavioral screenings or policy analysis to plan and manage a safe and effective health promotion program for both healthy and health-impaired individuals.

    You will acquire a knowledge base in nutrition, physical activity, and health law including screening and assessment and utilize this knowledge in health and well-being dissemination or implementation science activities.
     
  3. Develop skills and experience necessary to promote program services to appropriate community recipients including the ability to categorize subsets of the worksite/organization population and identify appropriate intervention strategies for each subset.

    You will be able to describe and conduct needs assessments and apply findings appropriately. Also, you will demonstrate the acquisition of marketing concepts to a health and well-being problem.
     
  4. Apply the requisite skills to plan and conduct inquiries into problems and outcomes used to develop and manage health and well-being activities, programs and campaigns.

    You will apply behavior change theory concepts and research and evaluation criteria to examine, critique, and assess health and well-being programs and activities.
     
  5. Collaborate with multiple disciplines to promote and administer health related research, activities, and policy at the organizational, community, state, and federal level.

    You will develop verbal and written communication strategies and skills and apply them to tasks involving collaboration, interpretation, and critical thinking for health and well-being activities. Also, be well versed in health and well-being policy development and strategic application at multiple levels of governments and organizations.
     
  6. Design and execute a comprehensive project or research-based inquiry relevant to the health promotion industry.

    You will integrate your learning in a research, inquiry, or review project on a topic pertinent to designing, planning, implementing, evaluating, managing, or marketing health and well-being.

Career outcomes

The health and well-being management program prepares graduates for careers that provide services to enhance employee health and consequent workforce productivity, including:

  • Administrator or manager of a health and well-being program/initiative for government, industry, or organizational entities.
  • Health and well-being educator/communicator, instructional program designer, developer, or implementer.
  • Preparation for future medical and dental education, doctoral training in fields related to nutrition, health promotion, exercise science, and public health.

Program Brochure

Download our program brochure for more information.

Curriculum for Health and Well-being Management MS

Health and Well-being Management, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
WSHN-700
Research Methods in Health and Well-being
Research Methods in Health and Well-being addresses requisite foundational skills to conduct rigorous, robust, and ethical research into problems related to health, nutrition and well-being. Evidence-based and translational research issues are presented in tandem with design of research studies, measurement approaches, funding opportunities, and research management considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
WSHN-701
Health and Nutrition Education and Evaluation
In Health and Nutrition Education and Evaluation, content and research expertise are applied to design effective, theory-based health and nutrition education and establish it as evidence-based. Needs assessment, behavior change models, theories of motivation, and learning styles are presented in the context of planning health and nutrition education and sampling, recruitment, participant retention, instrument development, and data analysis to foster development of evaluation expertise. (Co-requisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
WSHN-702
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being applies constructs practices, and values of dissemination and implementation sciences to health and well-being education activities. Strategies to foster translation of evidence-based practices to standard practice in public and private programs are applied in an experiential learning format. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Statistics Elective*
3
 
Electives
12
Choose one of the following:
3
   WSHN-710
   Health Risk Identification and Management (Emphasis Plan 1)
This course will explore health risk assessment and management, including determinants of population health; using epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological methods for identifying health hazards. Population health surveillance combined with methods of population health risk assessment will be considered regarding regulatory, economic, and technological approaches to population health risk management. Application of principles will be practiced through the examination of case studies. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
 
   HLTH-710
   Health Care Economics and Policy (Emphasis Plan 2)
This course provides an examination of the roles and responsibilities of policy makers on the health care system and the resulting economic impact of their policies. Students will compare and contrast the regulatory functions of varying levels of government, the political process and economic impacts as they relate to health care systems as well as examine control issues, economic functions and regulatory trends in the United States. In addition, an assessment will be made of national health systems and national health policies of other countries as they compare to the United States. Lecture 3 (Spring).
 
Choose one of the following:
6
   WSHN-790
   Health & Well-being Management Thesis
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of thesis adviser. Components include review of literature, definition of research aims, data collection and analysis, interpretation and discussion of findings, preparation of written paper following specified guidelines and standards, and oral defense of thesis. Enrollment for 6 credits in one semester or as necessary over multiple semesters for a total of 6 credits. (Prerequisites: WSHN-702 or equivalent course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   WSHN-797
   Health & Well-being Management Project, plus one additional Elective
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of a project adviser. Preparation of a Project Report following specified guidelines and standards, and oral presentation of the key report components. (Prerequisites: WSHN-702 or equivalent course.) Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
33

* Choose from PSYC-640 Graduate Statistics or MATH-655 Biostatistics

Emphasis Plan 1- Content Development, Implementation & Evaluation Electives

EXSC-650
Exercise Physiology
Exercise Physiology is the scientific basis for the field of Exercise Science. This course provides students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the body’s responses and adaptations to exercise. Neuromuscular physiology is reviewed along with energy systems and mechanisms of fatigue. The cardiorespiratory system is examined with a focus on control and regulation during activity and there is a look at the physiological components of exercise training. Environmental factors that impact sport activities as well as training techniques which optimize performance will be reviewed. The differences in performance and adaptation that exist between children, adolescents, and adults as well as between males and females will be compared and contrasted. Exercise’s influence on long term health and fitness will conclude the course. Laboratory experiences will allow students to integrate and apply the concepts of exercise physiology through investigative experiments. Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).
EXSC-690
Exercise Science Research
This course will build on the knowledge of statistics and epidemiology and provide the student with an introduction to research methodology and design. The course will enable the exercise science student to read and interpret relevant literature and evaluate the findings. The course will introduce different research methods and outcomes assessments and will require the exercise science student to create a formal research project. Projects may be in the form of: exercise science curriculum development, activity-related community service project, in-depth case review, meta-analysis of specific exercise application to a disease or syndrome, or original research. Lecture 3 (Spring).
NUTR-610
Integrative Approaches to Health
This one credit class offers an overview of controversial and accepted integrative health therapies, diet therapies, basic herbal medicine guidelines, and vitamin/mineral supplementation. Lecture 1 (Fall).
NUTR-650
Community Nutrition
Study of current nutrition issues and delivery of food and nutrition services in the community. The course is designed to allow senior level and graduate students to acquire skills necessary to deliver services in the public health and private sector markets. Individual practicum in community facility is required and arranged by the instructor. (Prerequisite: NUTR-625 or equivalent course.NUTR-625 Prereq) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Spring).
NUTR-654
Life Cycle Nutrition
An applied course for the Nutrition Management major regarding the nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Emphasis is given to nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, early childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and the elderly. Practicum in facilities delivering nutrition services to these age groups is required. Practicum hours by arrangement. Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Spring).
PHYA-729
Clinical Epidemiology
This course provides students with a foundation in epidemiological concepts from which infectious and non-infectious diseases manifest in acute and chronic settings. Course focuses on descriptive and analytical research designs, conditions associated with their use, and subsequent strengths and weaknesses. Principles of clinical epidemiology are applied to real-world clinical applications in addressing acute and chronic disease characteristics. (This course is restricted to students in PHYA-BS with at least 4th year standing or those students with graduate standing in PHYA-MS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
PSYC-713
Graduate Developmental Psychology
This course is designed to enhance students' knowledge and skills with regard to infant, child, and adolescent development. We will examine a variety of topics that relate to the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development of children and adolescents in the context of classic and current theory. We will also explore issues such as attachment, resiliency, and policy issues that pertain to positive child and adolescent development. Students will gain an enhanced knowledge of the sequence of child development and the processes that underlie it by studying child development from a chronological approach. Theories that discuss the various domains of development will be examined through each age period. This course will emphasize the interdependence of all domains of development and contribute to an appreciation of the interrelatedness of theory, research, and applications. Seminar (Fall).
PSYC-716
Graduate Social Psychology
This course explores topics related to understanding individuals in a social context. Topics may include, but are not limited to: Social Perception and Social Cognition; Attitudes; Social Identity; Prejudice and Discrimination; Interpersonal Attraction; Close Relationships; Social Influence; Prosocial Behavior; Aggression; Group Behavior; Artifacts and Methodological Issues in Social Psychology. Course format is seminar focused on reading assigned texts each week, writing reaction papers, and participating in discussion. Students will also conduct a study on the topic of their choice and present their findings both in an oral and written format. Seminar (Biannual).
SERQ-710
Service Design Fundamentals
Service design is a holistic design process. It uses skills from a variety of disciplines (design, management and process engineering) to develop models to create new services or to improve existing services in the most efficient and effective manner possible. The emphasis of the process is to provide value to the customer; as a service differentiator or create unique experiences for the customer. Service design uses methods and tools from a variety of disciplines to assist with the analysis and creation of enhanced systems. These tools include; mapping, blueprinting, analysis of customer behavior, market analysis, service marketing, and service recovery. The outcome of this course is to provide students with the fundamentals of service design thinking to allow them to lead the efforts of systematic design in a variety of disciplines. (SVCLED-MS, HSPT-MS) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
SERQ-712
Breakthrough Thinking, Creativity, and Innovation
This is an introductory-level survey course on the dynamics of innovation. The course focuses on individual, team and organization-human and systems dynamics that impact organizational innovation. Students gain awareness in, understanding of and important skills in fostering multi-level organizational human ecologies conducive to the creation of innovation. Issues and challenges important to leaders at all levels in an organization, entrepreneurs and talent management practitioners will be examined and explored. There is a required fee for the class to pay for the administration of the ISPI and Meyers Briggs evaluation instruments. Students will develop in their understanding of innovation, their own personal innovation capabilities, preferences, and the human dynamics unique to innovation applied in an organizational context. This background is becoming increasingly critical to developing innovation capabilities in and across organizations in our increasingly competitive and complex world. This course will build awareness and improve competency in the application of overall course content and design principles particular to developing innovation-competent individuals, teams, and organizations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
STAT-672
Survey Design and Analysis
This course is an introduction to sample survey design with emphasis on practical aspects of survey methodology. Topics include: survey planning, sample design and selection, survey instrument design, data collection methods, and analysis and reporting. Application areas discussed will include program evaluation, opinion polling, customer satisfaction, product and service design, and evaluating marketing effectiveness. Data collection methods to be discussed will include face-to-face, mail, Internet and telephone. (This course is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
WSHN-600
Principles and Practices of Health Education
Students will discover fundamental theories, principles and practices of health education to assess, plan, implement and evaluate components of health that challenge our well-being. Students will develop and apply health education skills to promote community and public health. This course helps prepare students to apply for the Community Health Education Specialist (CHES) credentialing examination. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
WSHN-799
Independent Study
This course provides the opportunity for independent investigation, under faculty supervision, on a subject matter either not included in existing courses or further investigation of a topic of interest presented in another course. A student-driven, faculty mentored proposal is drafted that describes the plan of work, deliverables expected, evaluation criteria, and possible credit load. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).

Emphasis Plan 2- Health & Well-being Program Management Electives

BUSI-710
Project Management
This course addresses project management from a multidisciplinary perspective, covering the fundamental nature of and techniques for managing a broad range of projects. Topics cover the Project Management Life Cycle from Planning to Termination. It also addresses the behavioral and quantitative facets of project management, as well as the use of methods, tools and techniques for the initiation, planning, and execution of projects. Introduces the standard framework, processes and knowledge areas of the Project Management Institute. *Note: Bachelors degree or minimum of 5 years of work experience in a project related business environment. Recommended education or work experience in organizational behavior, mathematics and basic accounting. *Note: BUSI-510 may not be substituted for BUSI-710 in a graduate concentration or the advanced certificate in project management. Additionally, a student may not register for and receive credit for both BUSI-510 and BUSI-710, whether taken as an undergraduate or graduate student. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
EDLI-733
Instructional Design
The process of instructional design is both an art and science. The framework of this course is to teach the students how to design instruction regardless of content area to allow learners to successfully achieve stated outcomes. The components of the course include problem identification, needs assessment, analysis of learner’s abilities, the design of measurable performance objectives, the development of assessment strategies within the design of instructional materials, and the formative and summative evaluation process. Lecture 3 (Spring).
HLTH-706
Leading Health Systems I
This is the first of three courses in the HSA, MS program that require students to be on campus. These “immersion” courses will be scheduled over a long weekend and will entail full days on campus as well as pre- and post-course work completed online. The concept is to immerse students in a series of experiences to support their development as high function managers and leaders within the health care industry. This course provides a detailed examination of the core principles of management as well as characteristics and disciplines that are required by persons holding management and leadership roles in health care delivery organizations. Lecture 3 (Summer).
HLTH-725
Healthcare Strategic Marketing & Communications
This course is designed to build innovative, customer-centered, thinking within the future leaders of the health care industry. This is accomplished with an introduction to the role of strategic decision making through the core principles of marketing (the 4’Ps). Students will also experience basic data base management, conducting an internal and external environmental analysis, primary and secondary data gathering and interpretation and the creation of a marketing plan to meet an unsatisfied market need or build volume for a health care product or service. Finally, the role of corporate communication will be interwoven throughout the course as it supports marketing success. Lecture 3 (Summer).
HLTH-730
Health Care Financial Management I: Principles & Practice
This course provides a basic understanding of health services financial management. We begin with elementary accounting concepts and then focus on financial statement preparation and analysis. Special topics areas include discounted cash flow, risk, capital investments evaluation, debt/equity financing, and financial decision making models such as break-even analysis, cash flow forecasting and the like. Lecture 3 (Fall).
HLTH-737
Lean Sigma in Health Care
This course teaches the principles Lean-Sigma and the application of its process improvement methodologies (and tools) in a health care environment. The curriculum examines the current challenges encountered in the healthcare industry and how the application of Lean-Sigma techniques can improve overall performance. A specific focus of the course is to learn the methodology used to obtain desired results of streamlining operations and enhancing administrative effectiveness in the clinical, administrative and service segments of health care. Lecture 3 (Summer).
HLTH-746
Leading Health Systems II
This is the second of three courses in the MHSA program that require students to be on campus. These “immersion” courses will be scheduled over a long weekend and will entail full days on campuses well as pre- and post-course work completed online. The concept is to immerse students in a series of experiences to support their development as high function managers and leaders within the health care industry. This course builds on the first Leading Health Care Systems course and provides a in-depth examination of advanced management and leadership knowledge, skills and values required of contemporary leaders within health care systems. (Prerequisites: HLTH-706 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
HRDE-710
Foundations in Human Resource Development
This course introduces students to the concepts that are the foundation of HRD and how these concepts are applied in a real-world environment. Human resource development is a distinct and unique area of practice that focuses on aligning employee learning and development with the strategic direction of an organization. This course provides an orientation to the profession and explores historical perspectives, theoretical foundations, and the practice of HRD. (This course is restricted to student in the HRDE-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
MGMT-800
Leadership Development I
This course builds on the assessment activities that are part of course MGMT-806. Each student participates in a 360-degree leadership assessment process. Based on this formal review, personal development plans are created and serve as dynamic documentation of individual professional progress. Students arrange individual counseling sessions with a leadership coach. Students then take action on the feedback received in order to develop self awareness. (Corequisite: MGMT-806 or equivalent course) Lecture 1 (Summer).
MGMT-801
Leadership Development II
This course is a continuation of MGMT-800. Leadership Development II requires student to explore and expand their potential as leaders. Through self and peer assessment, one-on-one coaching, career counseling, and written assignments, students develop leadership goals and create a plan to realize those goals. Students arrange individual counseling sessions with a leadership coach. (Prerequisites: MGMT-800 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
MKTG-761
Marketing Concepts and Commercialization
An introduction to contemporary principles and practices of marketing. The course is structured around the process of marketing planning leading to the development of successful marketing strategies, including the commercialization of products and services in domestic and international environments. Focus is on environmental scanning techniques, setting and evaluating measurable objectives, innovating and controlling the interrelated components of product/service offering, planning and executing the marketing mix (channels of distribution, price, and promotion), and enhancing customer relationships through the delivery of customer value. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
MKTG-772
Internet Marketing: Strategy & Tactics
This course examines the impact that the internet has on traditional and contemporary business-to-consumer marketing activities. It explores these implications in both strategic and tactical terms to enhance organizations' levels of competitiveness. The course identifies the use of the internet in enhancing value for consumers and considers the leverage of the latest technologies, trends, e-culture and innovation through the medium of the internet. (Prerequisites: MKTG-761 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
SERQ-710
Service Design Fundamentals
Service design is a holistic design process. It uses skills from a variety of disciplines (design, management and process engineering) to develop models to create new services or to improve existing services in the most efficient and effective manner possible. The emphasis of the process is to provide value to the customer; as a service differentiator or create unique experiences for the customer. Service design uses methods and tools from a variety of disciplines to assist with the analysis and creation of enhanced systems. These tools include; mapping, blueprinting, analysis of customer behavior, market analysis, service marketing, and service recovery. The outcome of this course is to provide students with the fundamentals of service design thinking to allow them to lead the efforts of systematic design in a variety of disciplines. (SVCLED-MS, HSPT-MS) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
SERQ-712
Breakthrough Thinking, Creativity, and Innovation
This is an introductory-level survey course on the dynamics of innovation. The course focuses on individual, team and organization-human and systems dynamics that impact organizational innovation. Students gain awareness in, understanding of and important skills in fostering multi-level organizational human ecologies conducive to the creation of innovation. Issues and challenges important to leaders at all levels in an organization, entrepreneurs and talent management practitioners will be examined and explored. There is a required fee for the class to pay for the administration of the ISPI and Meyers Briggs evaluation instruments. Students will develop in their understanding of innovation, their own personal innovation capabilities, preferences, and the human dynamics unique to innovation applied in an organizational context. This background is becoming increasingly critical to developing innovation capabilities in and across organizations in our increasingly competitive and complex world. This course will build awareness and improve competency in the application of overall course content and design principles particular to developing innovation-competent individuals, teams, and organizations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
SERQ-730
Project Management in the Service Sector
Managing public and private sector projects is a complex, demanding process involving ethical considerations, leadership, the ability to understand complex rules and regulations, the politics of the administration and the vagaries of the budget process. This conceptual framework will address planning, selection of team members, contracts and agreements, monitoring and adjusting the project progress and completion of the project through turnkey stages. The end result of this process is to contribute to establishment of trust of the stakeholders, minimize failure and maximize success. (Prerequisites: SERQ-710 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
SERQ-735
Data Mining In the Service Sector
To gather and analyze public/private service sector information to inform decisions is the goal of every public/private sector administration. Data can drive success of governments and organizations or lead to their downfall. This course will explore data mining used in the public/private sector, how to gather it and utilize the results of the data collections to inform decisions that reflect the needs and desires of the stakeholders in this sector. Lecture 3 (Fall).
STAT-672
Survey Design and Analysis
This course is an introduction to sample survey design with emphasis on practical aspects of survey methodology. Topics include: survey planning, sample design and selection, survey instrument design, data collection methods, and analysis and reporting. Application areas discussed will include program evaluation, opinion polling, customer satisfaction, product and service design, and evaluating marketing effectiveness. Data collection methods to be discussed will include face-to-face, mail, Internet and telephone. (This course is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
WSHN-799
Independent Study
This course provides the opportunity for independent investigation, under faculty supervision, on a subject matter either not included in existing courses or further investigation of a topic of interest presented in another course. A student-driven, faculty mentored proposal is drafted that describes the plan of work, deliverables expected, evaluation criteria, and possible credit load. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in health and well-being management, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college.
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit scores from the GRE.
  • Submit a personal statement of educational objectives that includes your rationale for applying to the program, statement of research and career interests and experience, extenuating circumstances or considerations for application review, and why you want to attend RIT.
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.
  • Submit three letters of recommendation, with at least one from a university/college faculty member.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 79 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

Latest News

  • May 4, 2020

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    RIT has announced a tuition scholarship program for this year’s RIT graduates seeking to further advance their career opportunities while the job market recalibrates and the country responds to the coronavirus pandemic. The RIT Class of 2020 Master Plan includes a special scholarship covering 55% of graduate tuition. RIT students who graduate in May or August this year may be eligible for this scholarship.

  • November 22, 2019

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    RIT offers health and well-being management MS degree

    The new graduate degree in health and well-being management will prepare students for careers in primary health care, corporate America and community health programs, or for medical/dental school and health-related Ph.D. programs.