Health and Well-being Management MS

Health and Well-being Management, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
WSHN-700
Research Methods in Health and Well-being
Research Methods in Health and Well-being addresses requisite foundational skills to conduct rigorous, robust, and ethical research into problems related to health, nutrition and well-being. Evidence-based and translational research issues are presented in tandem with design of research studies, measurement approaches, funding opportunities, and research management considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
WSHN-701
Health and Nutrition Education and Evaluation
In Health and Nutrition Education and Evaluation, content and research expertise are applied to design effective, theory-based health and nutrition education and establish it as evidence-based. Needs assessment, behavior change models, theories of motivation, and learning styles are presented in the context of planning health and nutrition education and sampling, recruitment, participant retention, instrument development, and data analysis to foster development of evaluation expertise. (Co-requisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
WSHN-702
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being
Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health and Well-being applies constructs practices, and values of dissemination and implementation sciences to health and well-being education activities. Strategies to foster translation of evidence-based practices to standard practice in public and private programs are applied in an experiential learning format. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Statistics Elective*
3
 
Professional Electives
12
Choose one of the following:
3
   WSHN-710
   Health Risk Identification and Management (Emphasis Plan 1)
This course will explore health risk assessment and management, including determinants of population health; using epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological methods for identifying health hazards. Population health surveillance combined with methods of population health risk assessment will be considered regarding regulatory, economic, and technological approaches to population health risk management. Application of principles will be practiced through the examination of case studies. (Prerequisites: WSHN-700 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
 
   HLTH-710
   Health Care Economics and Policy (Emphasis Plan 2)
This course provides an examination of the roles and responsibilities of policy makers on the health care system and the resulting economic impact of their policies. Students will compare and contrast the regulatory functions of varying levels of government, the political process and economic impacts as they relate to health care systems as well as examine control issues, economic functions and regulatory trends in the United States. In addition, an assessment will be made of national health systems and national health policies of other countries as they compare to the United States. Lecture 3 (Spring).
 
Choose one of the following:
6
   WSHN-790
   Health & Well-being Management Thesis
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of thesis adviser. Components include review of literature, definition of research aims, data collection and analysis, interpretation and discussion of findings, preparation of written paper following specified guidelines and standards, and oral defense of thesis. Enrollment for 6 credits in one semester or as necessary over multiple semesters for a total of 6 credits. (Prerequisites: WSHN-702 or equivalent course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   WSHN-797
   Health & Well-being Management Project, plus one additional Professional Elective
Application of writing and research skills and principles in an independent investigation of a focused problem under direction of a project adviser. Preparation of a Project Report following specified guidelines and standards, and oral presentation of the key report components. (Prerequisites: WSHN-702 or equivalent course.) Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
33

* Choose from PSYC-640 Graduate Statistics or MATH-655 Biostatistics

Emphasis Plan 1- Content Development, Implementation & Evaluation Recommended Electives

EXSC-650
Exercise Physiology
Exercise Physiology is the scientific basis for the field of Exercise Science. This course provides students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the body’s responses and adaptations to exercise. Neuromuscular physiology is reviewed along with energy systems and mechanisms of fatigue. The cardiorespiratory system is examined with a focus on control and regulation during activity and there is a look at the physiological components of exercise training. Environmental factors that impact sport activities as well as training techniques which optimize performance will be reviewed. The differences in performance and adaptation that exist between children, adolescents, and adults as well as between males and females will be compared and contrasted. Exercise’s influence on long term health and fitness will conclude the course. Laboratory experiences will allow students to integrate and apply the concepts of exercise physiology through investigative experiments. Lab 3 (Fall).
EXSC-690
Exercise Science Research
This course will build on the knowledge of statistics and epidemiology and provide the student with an introduction to research methodology and design. The course will enable the exercise science student to read and interpret relevant literature and evaluate the findings. The course will introduce different research methods and outcomes assessments and will require the exercise science student to create a formal research project. Projects may be in the form of: exercise science curriculum development, activity-related community service project, in-depth case review, meta-analysis of specific exercise application to a disease or syndrome, or original research. Lecture 3 (Spring).
HRDE-726
Technology and the Future of Work
The rapid pace of progress in technology and the change in demographics of the workforce are anticipated to affect what work will look like in the future, in addition to the structure and nature of work itself. Some of these changes might be incremental and others more radical and disruptive affecting the conduct of business. The pace, nature, and magnitude of these changes demand that businesses, organizations, educators, policy makers, leaders, managers, and individual employees reimagine models of employment including the organization and functioning of the workforce. This course is intended to provide students with a global perspective of the future of work and employment, and insights into the implications on their designated professions and careers. Among others, this course will address the following questions: What are the skills and competencies required of the workforce for this new future of work? What skills, competencies, and job roles may become redundant? How should corporations preempt and prepare to deal with these changes? What will be the role of leaders and managers in reimagining and developing the workforce of the future? Seminar 3 (Fall).
NUTR-610
Integrative Approaches to Health
This one credit class offers an overview of controversial and accepted integrative health therapies, diet therapies, basic herbal medicine guidelines, and vitamin/mineral supplementation. Lecture 1 (Fall).
NUTR-650
Community Nutrition
Study of current nutrition issues and delivery of food and nutrition services in the community. The course is designed to allow senior level and graduate students to acquire skills necessary to deliver services in the public health and private sector markets. Individual practicum in community facility is required and arranged by the instructor. (Prerequisite: NUTR-625 or equivalent course.NUTR-625 Prereq) Lab 4 (Spring).
NUTR-655
Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle
NUTR-680
Global Food and Nutrition Perspectives
This course provides an overview of global food and nutrition concepts and issues from both developed and developing country perspectives. Topics include breastfeeding, macronutrients and micronutrient problems, food security and access, food emergencies, maternal and child health and the impacts of socio-economic disparities on nutrition status. Also addressed are challenges in food and nutrition policy development, program design and implementation that are unique to global efforts and sustainable development goals (SDGs). Students apply course content and analytical thinking skills to a unique self-selected country and develop dissemination skills by informing others of the unique food, nutrition and health issues. (Co-requisite: NUTR-654 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
PSYC-713
Graduate Developmental Psychology
This course is designed to enhance students' knowledge and skills with regard to infant, child, and adolescent development. We will examine a variety of topics that relate to the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development of children and adolescents in the context of classic and current theory. We will also explore issues such as attachment, resiliency, and policy issues that pertain to positive child and adolescent development. Students will gain an enhanced knowledge of the sequence of child development and the processes that underlie it by studying child development from a chronological approach. Theories that discuss the various domains of development will be examined through each age period. This course will emphasize the interdependence of all domains of development and contribute to an appreciation of the interrelatedness of theory, research, and applications. Seminar (Fall).
PSYC-716
Graduate Social Psychology
This course explores topics related to understanding individuals in a social context. Topics may include, but are not limited to: Social Perception and Social Cognition; Attitudes; Social Identity; Prejudice and Discrimination; Interpersonal Attraction; Close Relationships; Social Influence; Prosocial Behavior; Aggression; Group Behavior; Artifacts and Methodological Issues in Social Psychology. Course format is seminar focused on reading assigned texts each week, writing reaction papers, and participating in discussion. Students will also conduct a study on the topic of their choice and present their findings both in an oral and written format. Seminar (Biannual).
SERQ-723
Service Analytics
Analytics in service organizations is based on four phases: analysis and determination of what data to collect, gathering the data, analyzing it, and communicating the findings to others. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of analytics to develop a measurement strategy for a given area of research and analysis. While this measurement process is used to ensure that operations function well and customer needs are met; the real power of measurement lies in using analytics predicatively to drive growth and service, to transform the organization and the value delivered to customers. Topics include big data, the role of measurement in growth and innovation, methodologies to measure quality, and other intangibles. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
SERQ-747
Design Thinking and Creativity
The use of creative problem solving to discover new alternatives in the design of products and services is the essence of design thinking. The innovation design thinking process seeks creative inspiration to solve a problem, generating and selecting ideas to develop a path from design to market. Design thinking tools and strategies are discussed as are “Wicked Problems” and the impact design thinking can have on developing a solution for these problems. An in-depth approach uses stories and prototypes to design products/ services in an effort to solve problems in an innovative and sustainable manner. Lecture 3 (Fall).
STAT-672
Survey Design and Analysis
This course is an introduction to sample survey design with emphasis on practical aspects of survey methodology. Topics include: survey planning, sample design and selection, survey instrument design, data collection methods, and analysis and reporting. Application areas discussed will include program evaluation, opinion polling, customer satisfaction, product and service design, and evaluating marketing effectiveness. Data collection methods to be discussed will include face-to-face, mail, Internet and telephone. (This course is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
WSHN-600
Principles and Practices of Health Education
Students will discover fundamental theories, principles and practices of health education to assess, plan, implement and evaluate components of health that challenge our well-being. Students will develop and apply health education skills to promote community and public health. This course helps prepare students to apply for the Community Health Education Specialist (CHES) credentialing examination. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
WSHN-720
Topics in Health and Nutrition
Topics in Health and Nutrition engages learners to explore topics of current concern and interest in health and nutrition. Topic-specific literature selection, review, and dissection are the focus of group-based journal club discussions that also foster group facilitation and decision-making skills. Issues of individual interest drive investigative and summative activities that develop abilities in peer review and dissemination, including writing, graphic display, and technology-based modes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
WSHN-799
Independent Study
This course provides the opportunity for independent investigation, under faculty supervision, on a subject matter either not included in existing courses or further investigation of a topic of interest presented in another course. A student-driven, faculty mentored proposal is drafted that describes the plan of work, deliverables expected, evaluation criteria, and possible credit load. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).

Emphasis Plan 2- Health & Well-being Program Management Recommended Electives

BUSI-710
Project Management
EDLI-733
Instructional Design
The process of instructional design is both an art and science. The framework of this course is to teach the students how to design instruction regardless of content area to allow learners to successfully achieve stated outcomes. The components of the course include problem identification, needs assessment, analysis of learner’s abilities, the design of measurable performance objectives, the development of assessment strategies within the design of instructional materials, and the formative and summative evaluation process. Lecture 3 (Spring).
HLTH-706
Leading Health Systems I
This is the first of three courses in the HSA, MS program that require students to be on campus. These “immersion” courses will be scheduled over a long weekend and will entail full days on campus as well as pre- and post-course work completed online. The concept is to immerse students in a series of experiences to support their development as high function managers and leaders within the health care industry. This course provides a detailed examination of the core principles of management as well as characteristics and disciplines that are required by persons holding management and leadership roles in health care delivery organizations. Lecture 3 (Summer).
HLTH-718
Evidence-based Management in Healthcare
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to evidence-based management practice in health care. The primary focus is to ensure that managers ask the right questions, use the best evidence available and make better decisions in carrying out their mission. Students will participate in the process of retrieval, appraisal, and synthesis of evidence in collaboration with other members of the health care team to improve processes and patient outcomes in diverse populations. Students complete an individual, final assignment demonstrating the ability to collect, document, and translate research (evidence) on the practice of health care management . Lecture 3 (Spring).
HLTH-725
Healthcare Strategic Marketing & Communications
This course is designed to build innovative, customer-centered, thinking within the future leaders of the health care industry. This is accomplished with an introduction to the role of strategic decision making through the core principles of marketing (the 4’Ps). Students will also experience basic data base management, conducting an internal and external environmental analysis, primary and secondary data gathering and interpretation and the creation of a marketing plan to meet an unsatisfied market need or build volume for a health care product or service. Finally, the role of corporate communication will be interwoven throughout the course as it supports marketing success. Lecture 3 (Summer).
HLTH-730
Health Care Financial Management I: Principles & Practice
This course provides a basic understanding of health services financial management. We begin with elementary accounting concepts and then focus on financial statement preparation and analysis. Special topics areas include discounted cash flow, risk, capital investments evaluation, debt/equity financing, and financial decision making models such as break-even analysis, cash flow forecasting and the like. Lecture 3 (Fall).
HLTH-733
Health Systems Quality and Organizational Learning
This course will incorporate an examination of contemporary organizational systems thinking focusing on concepts relevant to health service organizations and their communities; emphasizing organizational quality, leadership, environment, strategy, structure, and processes. The course provides students with the evaluation of key factors affecting an organization’s system as well as their community, through quality and analytical thinking; allowing the student to apply theories that suggest an effective organizational response to such influences and change. Lecture 3 .
HLTH-746
Leading Health Systems II
This is the second of three courses in the MHSA program that require students to be on campus. These “immersion” courses will be scheduled over a long weekend and will entail full days on campuses well as pre- and post-course work completed online. The concept is to immerse students in a series of experiences to support their development as high function managers and leaders within the health care industry. This course builds on the first Leading Health Care Systems course and provides a in-depth examination of advanced management and leadership knowledge, skills and values required of contemporary leaders within health care systems. (Prerequisites: HLTH-706 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
HRDE-726
Technology and the Future of Work
The rapid pace of progress in technology and the change in demographics of the workforce are anticipated to affect what work will look like in the future, in addition to the structure and nature of work itself. Some of these changes might be incremental and others more radical and disruptive affecting the conduct of business. The pace, nature, and magnitude of these changes demand that businesses, organizations, educators, policy makers, leaders, managers, and individual employees reimagine models of employment including the organization and functioning of the workforce. This course is intended to provide students with a global perspective of the future of work and employment, and insights into the implications on their designated professions and careers. Among others, this course will address the following questions: What are the skills and competencies required of the workforce for this new future of work? What skills, competencies, and job roles may become redundant? How should corporations preempt and prepare to deal with these changes? What will be the role of leaders and managers in reimagining and developing the workforce of the future? Seminar 3 (Fall).
HRDE-735
Leading Human Resources
The goal of this course is to develop knowledge of Human Resource Development and Management practices for the purpose of analyzing, communicating, evaluating, and leading the development of strategic human resource initiatives that react to emerging organizational concerns. This course is a foundation course for those seeking a leadership opportunity in Human Resources in which students will demonstrate their ability to analyze and lead the alignment of strategic organizational goals into HR functions. Lecture 3 (Spring).
HRDE-742
Leading Change
Major change initiatives within organizations fail because of lack of understanding of the process of change and the lack of deliberate and focused attention to the change process. This course teaches students the change process and the alterations required in structures, processes, and activities to effectively implement change initiatives within organizations. The components of this course include applied approaches and tools to help analyze barriers for change, leverage power and influence, and provide frameworks to plan and implement change. Lecture 3 (Summer).
HRDE-765
Diversity in Global Workplace
As strategic partners in global workforce development, human resource development professionals guide organizations to build and maintain a diverse workforce. Diversity and inclusion exploit the natural synergies of a multicultural workforce. This course will examine dimensions of diversity beyond race, ethnicity, and gender and create opportunities to develop an understanding about how these dimensions intersect and play out in the workplace. The purpose of this course is to provide HRD professionals the knowledge required to manage these dynamics in an organizational setting and lead initiatives that will create and maintain an inclusive workplace. Project work will allow for the in-depth ability to assess the current state of diversity within a defined organization, conduct research and benchmarking to build a diverse workforce, and develop a diversity strategic plan with an on-going evaluation component to assess the success of diversity initiatives. Lecture 3 (Spring).
MKTG-761
Marketing Concepts and Commercialization
An introduction to contemporary principles and practices of marketing. The course is structured around the process of marketing planning leading to the development of successful marketing strategies, including the commercialization of products and services in domestic and international environments. Focus is on environmental scanning techniques, setting and evaluating measurable objectives, innovating and controlling the interrelated components of product/service offering, planning and executing the marketing mix (channels of distribution, price, and promotion), and enhancing customer relationships through the delivery of customer value. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
MKTG-772
Internet Marketing: Strategy & Tactics
This course examines the impact that the internet has on traditional and contemporary business-to-consumer marketing activities. It explores these implications in both strategic and tactical terms to enhance organizations' levels of competitiveness. The course identifies the use of the internet in enhancing value for consumers and considers the leverage of the latest technologies, trends, e-culture and innovation through the medium of the internet. (Prerequisites: MKTG-761 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
SERQ-720
Foresight for Innovation
The service world has many examples of once-successful companies that failed to accomplish the primary goal of every organization: consistently design, deliver value to customers and other key stakeholder groups in a highly competitive and ever-changing service environment. Today’s organizational leaders must be able to develop and implement strategies that ensure the continued competitiveness of their organizations, and identify and leverage opportunities for growth and innovation brought about by change. Firmly grounded in the fundamentals of strategy development this course prepares students to create and sustain competitive advantage; and to apply key foresight techniques including scenario planning to anticipate future opportunities. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
SERQ-722
Customer Centricity
The Customer Centricity course develops the learners ability to help their organization manage its interactions with its valued customers across multiple channels, maximize revenue opportunities, build foundations to increase customer satisfaction, and drive customer retention and loyalty. Lecture 3 (Spring).
SERQ-723
Service Analytics
Analytics in service organizations is based on four phases: analysis and determination of what data to collect, gathering the data, analyzing it, and communicating the findings to others. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of analytics to develop a measurement strategy for a given area of research and analysis. While this measurement process is used to ensure that operations function well and customer needs are met; the real power of measurement lies in using analytics predicatively to drive growth and service, to transform the organization and the value delivered to customers. Topics include big data, the role of measurement in growth and innovation, methodologies to measure quality, and other intangibles. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
SERQ-740
Leading Innovation
Achieving competitive advantage in today’s world demands that organizations know how to innovate, and do so not once, but repeatedly. Creativity, rapid learning through continuous improvement, and the ability to turn ideas into action, products, processes and services are crucial. How do leaders foster and sustain a culture of innovation? What unique competencies and skills do you need as a leader and what skills do your teams need? How is managing an innovation team different than managing other kinds of teams within an organization? Through this course, service leadership students will leverage and build on their growing knowledge about innovation, the individual and group skills required for innovating gained in SERQ-712. Students will gain deeper insights into innovation leadership requirements for creating, managing and curating a thriving environment in which cutting edge ideas are encouraged, born and grown. Open to students in the service leadership and innovation MS program and non-majors on a space available basis with department permission. (Prerequisite: SERQ-712 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
SERQ-747
Design Thinking and Creativity
The use of creative problem solving to discover new alternatives in the design of products and services is the essence of design thinking. The innovation design thinking process seeks creative inspiration to solve a problem, generating and selecting ideas to develop a path from design to market. Design thinking tools and strategies are discussed as are “Wicked Problems” and the impact design thinking can have on developing a solution for these problems. An in-depth approach uses stories and prototypes to design products/ services in an effort to solve problems in an innovative and sustainable manner. Lecture 3 (Fall).
STAT-672
Survey Design and Analysis
This course is an introduction to sample survey design with emphasis on practical aspects of survey methodology. Topics include: survey planning, sample design and selection, survey instrument design, data collection methods, and analysis and reporting. Application areas discussed will include program evaluation, opinion polling, customer satisfaction, product and service design, and evaluating marketing effectiveness. Data collection methods to be discussed will include face-to-face, mail, Internet and telephone. (This course is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
WSHN-720
Topics in Health and Nutrition
Topics in Health and Nutrition engages learners to explore topics of current concern and interest in health and nutrition. Topic-specific literature selection, review, and dissection are the focus of group-based journal club discussions that also foster group facilitation and decision-making skills. Issues of individual interest drive investigative and summative activities that develop abilities in peer review and dissemination, including writing, graphic display, and technology-based modes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
WSHN-799
Independent Study
This course provides the opportunity for independent investigation, under faculty supervision, on a subject matter either not included in existing courses or further investigation of a topic of interest presented in another course. A student-driven, faculty mentored proposal is drafted that describes the plan of work, deliverables expected, evaluation criteria, and possible credit load. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).