Corinna Hill Headshot

Corinna Hill

Lecturer
Department of Cultural and Creative Studies
National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Corinna Hill

Lecturer
Department of Cultural and Creative Studies
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Instructional/Support Faculty

Currently Teaching

NHSS-275
3 Credits
This course introduces students to Deaf Cultural Studies using stories about the Deaf experience. Students will interpret works in visual art, film, performing arts, and literature (ASL and English). Students will learn how historical/social/political and intersectional context, Deaf cultural values, and themes and symbols influence our interpretation of these creative works. Finally, the importance of collective memories for preserving Deaf cultural norms/values and promoting social justice will be addressed.
HIST-230
3 Credits
This course explores the history of the deaf community in the United States. It offers a broad survey of American deaf history from the early 19th century to the late 20th century. Major events in American deaf history will be considered, including the foundation of schools for the deaf, the birth of American Sign Language, the emergence of deaf culture, the challenge of oralism, the threat of eugenics, and the fight for civil rights.
SOCI-240
3 Credits
This course is an introductory survey of Deaf culture in the United States. Students will study the scholarly literature pertaining to various social groups in the Deaf community and have contact with their members. This course will familiarize students with the characteristics of Deaf Culture, as well as general perceptions of the Deaf community within the dominant mainstream society.
HIST-330
3 Credits
The deaf community has a long and complicated relationship with technological devices. The deaf community, for instance, was quick to embrace the new technology of moving pictures, and many deaf actors found work in early Hollywood during the silent film era. Most lost their livelihoods when sound was introduced to motion pictures. Deaf people were left out of the communication revolution brought about by the telephone for many years, but now the deaf community is increasingly a wired community, as texting, tweeting, and vlogging makes more communication technologies accessible to deaf users. This course will explore the historical relationship between technology and deafness. It will consider how views of deafness frequently shape technology, that is, if deafness is viewed as a pathological illness, technologies are focused on curing it (e.g., cochlear implants), whereas, if deaf people are viewed as members of linguistic and cultural minority, technologies are harnessed to make it easier for that minority to interact with the majority culture (e.g, relay systems). This course will consider how deaf people have historically used, created, and adopted technologies to their own ends.
HIST-499
1 - 3 Credits
A student may register for an independent study project subject to the approval of the faculty sponsor, student's department, the academic committee of the college of liberal arts and the dean of the college of liberal arts and providing that she or he has a minimum GPA of 2.7 at time of application. An independent study project is not a substitute for a course. It enables the interested student and his or her faculty sponsor to coordinate their efforts on subjects and topics that range beyond the normal sequence of course selection.