Academic Affairs

Overview

In his role as Interim Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Gary Behm assures that the college is centered around student and faculty/staff success, from enrollment through degree completion, to job placement after graduation. Academic Affairs is a collaborative organization that includes:

  • Ten academic departments
  • Communication Assessment

The Academic Affairs office is responsible for implementing numerous college functions and initiatives:

  • College policies, including promotion and tenure
  • College committees
  • Curriculum actions
  • Student Learning Outcomes assessment
  • Student Ratings Systems (SRATE & SRS)
  • Student and Faculty Awards
  • Faculty/Staff Professional Development
  • Course scheduling and degree certification
Gary Behm
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
585-475-4756

COACHE Survey

Presentation files for COACHE Survey:

Communication/ Resources

Curriculum

Charge:

The NTID Curriculum Committee (NCC) is generally responsible for ensuring that the principles as adopted by the faculty of NTID as basic to all curriculum actions are adhered to.  In particular, the NCC is required to review: course additions, course modifications, course deletions, new concept papers, program additions, program modifications and program discontinuances, and certificate additions and modifications. This is done in concert with each of the academic departments and the VP/Dean's Office from both a disciplinary and inter-disciplinary perspective. The NCC looks at curriculum development from a college-university wide perspective (anticipating the requirements of the Institute Curriculum Committee (ICC) and Graduate Council (GC) and New York State Education Department) and serves as a feasibility review panel for the VP/Dean. [Elected three-year term]

Committee Composition Faculty/ Staff Representative Office/ Email Voting Member? Term Ending
Group 1 – NTID Learning Consortium Linda Bryant LBJ-2483/ lmbnca Yes 2023
Group 2 – Business Studies Michael Kane, GEC rep LBJ-2779/ meknbt Yes 2022
Group 1 – but from Business Studies Kelly Metz Davis (finishing Jason Listman's term) LOW-3306/ kmmsfs Yes 2022
Group 1 – VCS Kurt Stoskopf BOO-1520/ kwsnda Yes 2022
Group 2 – Information and Computing Studies David Lawrence LBJ-2340/ delnet Yes 2021
Group 1 – Communication Studies and Services Linda Gottermeier LBJ-3123/ lggnca Yes 2021
Group 2 – Information and Computing Studies Tom Simpson (finishing Adriana Kulakowski's term) LBJ-2352/ tesndp Yes 2021
Group 2 – Engineering Studies Dino Laury, Chair LBJ-1275/ djlnet Yes 2023
ICC Representative Jason Listman LBJ-3636/ jdlnss Yes 2023
VP/Dean's Appointment/ SLT/ NCE/ Admissions Representative NCE Rep   No On-going
Alternate-Group 1 Sharron Webster LBJ-2275/ smwsdo   2023
VP/Dean's Liaison – Curriculum Resource Associate Matthew Lynn LBJ-2273/ malntm No 2021
VP/Dean's Support (Notetaker) Firoza Kavanagh LBJ-2850/ fxknvd No Permanent

NCC Guidelines AY 2020-21

From the RIT Academic Program and Curriculum Management website, make the appropriate selection:

Step 1: New Program Ideas

  • Select 'New Program Idea Vetting Process & New Program Checklist'
  • Select '...Intent Document and Timeline'

Step 2: New Program Proposal Development (if Program Idea is approved)

  • Select 'New RIT Degree and Certificate Proposal Preparation'
  • Review Pre-Work, Proposal Writing, and NYSED Registration sections, as appropriate
  • Select 'Step 5...'

Faculty Performance Review

Annual Faculty Appraisal Process Forms:

Mid-Course Feedback (MCF)

Departments at NTID/RIT can decide to participate in Mid-Semester Course Evaluation via the SRATE/SmartEvals system or use a Qualtrics Survey. The differences between the two options can be found at this link: Qualtrics and SRATE/SmartEvals.

Mid-Course Feedback (MCF) is a process initiated in response to students’ desire to see that their opinions are valued by teachers and can impact what happens in their courses. Students rarely have the opportunity to observe improvements that directly result from their end-of-term evaluations such as NTID’s SRATE/SmartEvals and the Services Rating System (SRS1:1). MCF is a strategy that can lead to more meaningful, mutually satisfying, and potentially higher end-of-term student ratings, while also impacting a course while it is still in progress.

Student feedback solicited several weeks into the semester can lead to mid-course corrections regarding communication, teaching strategies, materials, assignments, pace and rigor. Instructors have the opportunity to improve their teaching effectiveness and student satisfaction in a timely way.

Mid-Course Feedback is a private process conducted between teachers and students and is not intended to be shared with anyone else unless an instructor chooses to do so. MCF is facilitated by the SRS Advisory Group in NTID Academic Affairs but it is not a part of the student rating systems. Unlike the SRS, MCF is an informal evaluation process with no formal data collection or reporting.

Mid-Course Feedback Sections
  • See FAQ for information and timelines about the Mid-Course Feedback (MCF).
  • See Guidelines for how to share students’ feedback (survey results) with them and make plans for responding to concerns.
  • See Research to learn more about the importance and benefits of MCF. 
SRATE Mid-Course Feedback Survey
  • See RIT's MCF Survey Sample below for a list of statements and comment boxes used in the MCF SRATE/SmartEvals survey and guidance in creating your own survey.
Qualtrics Mid-Course Feedback Survey
WHAT?

Mid-Course Feedback (MCF) is an initiative of NTID Academic Affairs to provide tools for classroom instructors to solicit useful feedback from their students mid-way through the term. The primary tool is an online survey administered to students. The SRATE MCF includes five Likert agreement-scale items, each paired with an optional comment box for students to explain their answers regarding these topics:

  • Communication between instructor and student
  • Communication among students
  • Materials
  • Difficulty level and pace
  • Homework and projects

Two comment boxes allow students to indicate what is “best” and “worst” about the course.

A Qualtrics Survey will also be made available to faculty, that contains additional questions and opportunities to comment. Qualtrics offers the opportunity for the survey to be customized based on a student's responses, by automatically skipping inapplicable sections or providing additional applicable questions based on a certain prior response by the student. 

MCF is optional, flexible and brief. Instructors can use the SRATE or Qualtrics survey, or they can create their own paper surveys using MCF questions on their own.

WHY?

Mid-Course Feedback benefits both students and instructors.

Students gain because they feel they have some voice, some way to indicate a need for change before it’s too late. Many students indicated in a 2009 attitudes survey about the former course evaluations that they didn’t feel their ratings made any difference for themselves, and they couldn't see any changes over time across the term.

Instructors gain because they have an opportunity to improve their effectiveness (student learning) and student satisfaction in a timely way. A clear majority of instructors indicated in a 2011 survey that they were interested in soliciting and using mid-course student feedback. The MCF is an effort to facilitate that feedback.

Keeps private conversation going between the instructor and the students.
The MCF is not shared with anyone else, unless the instructor chooses to do so. It is not part of any formal evaluation process.

WHO?

Classroom instructors from any academic program can use the MCF. 

WHEN?

Suggested timeline for activities during Weeks 2 through 8 of a 14-week semester-based term:

  • Week 2: Qualtrics instructions sent to NTID
  • Week 3: SRATE MCF particpation lists requested from Department Chairs
  • Week 4: Department Chairs send SRATE participation lists to Student Ratings Coordinator
  • Week 5: If Qualtrics is used,Instructor imports survey to their site and edits according to their needs.
  • Week 6: Instructor administers MCF survey to students. Students complete MCF through SRATE or Qualtrics.
  • Week 7: Instructor summarizes the results and insights for the class from their SRATE or Qualtrics survey, considers how to respond to the feedback, and makes a reasonable plan with the students.
  • Week 8: Instructor follows up briefly with students in class to see how the plan is working.
  1. Keep it short. Sharing MCF survey results with your students should take NO MORE THAN ten minutes of teaching time at the start of class!
  2. Thank the students for participating! A better class can result with their help!
  3. Briefly summarize the ratings. Begin with a summary and overall distribution of the ratings for each question. Don’t place any specific positive or negative value on the results. Students shouldn’t think you had an expectation for what the ratings would be. 

    IMPORTANT: DO NOT do ANYTHING that would reveal an individual student’s rating or comments! Don’t overemphasize comments from one person.
     
  4. Bring up only one or two of the most important items and determine a possible plan of action. Summarize insights and consensus comments. Note the areas you think may need attention. Students need to know you read what they wrote and appreciate their feedback. It’s an attitude that you’re trying to convey. Be objective. Don’t take comments personally. Invite discussion to clarify comments. This can be a shared problem-solving session.
     
    • Examples: 

      “I see several of you feel the homework is not helpful. What can we do?” 

      “A few people thought the pace was too slow. Would less repetition help?”
       
    • Students need to know you can’t change some things.

      Example: A textbook, or a specific test might need to be part of the class.
       
    • Suggest ways students can participate in addressing the concerns.

      Example: In-class participation, tutoring, study groups, or meeting with you.
  5. Offer one-on-one meetings as a follow-up. Some students may not want to share or disclose their comments in the group situation.
  6. Follow up in class in a few weeks. Find out if what you and the students have been doing to address concerns has helped. 

For further information about how to use Comments from Students, see Syracuse University information

Seek tips from colleagues and the RIT Teaching and Learning Services at Wallace.

Research about student ratings and mid-course feedback

Benton, S. L., & Cashin, W. E. (2012). IDEA Paper No. 50: Student ratings of teaching: A summary of research and literature. Manhattan, KS: The IDEA Center. 

This IDEA Paper is an update of the IDEA Paper No. 32 Student Ratings of Teaching: The Research Revisited, (Cashin, 1995). It attempts to summarize the conclusions of the major reviews of the student ratings research and literature from the 1970s to 2010. While that literature is extensive and complex, this brief paper offers broad, general summaries and a good number of citations. As such, it is an excellent resource which draws several noteworthy conclusions.

Download the document

Bullock, C.D. (2003). Online Collection of Midterm Student Feedback. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 96, 95-102.

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign created an electronic evaluation system (EON) for online courses which includes a mechanism for instructors to collect midterm (formative) feedback as well as end-of-term (summative) ratings. In this chapter, Bullock focuses on the midterm component, beginning with a review of pertinent literature. She describes a pilot program utilizing EON as well as a study that was conducted to gain an understanding of how and why instructors use midterm feedback. They found that instructors preferred this type of online system to paper-pencil evaluations and wanted consultative services for item development and for the interpretation of results.

Download the document

Spencer, K. J. & Schmelkin, L. P. ( 2002). Student Perspectives on Teaching and its Evaluation. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 27 (5), 397-409.

The study described in this article explored student perspectives on course and teacher ratings as well as some issues related to teaching effectiveness and faculty roles. Spencer and Schmelkin found that while students were generally willing to complete teacher evaluations and provide feedback they had little confidence that faculty or administration viewed or paid attention to the results. Noting that end-of-term instruments should not be the only formalized way for students to express their views, they support “mid-term formative evaluations.”

Download the document

Medina, Brenda. ( 2011). As Emphasis on Student Evaluations Grows, Professors Increasingly Seek Midcourse Feedback. The Chronicle of Higher Education

A growing number of academics are asking students to evaluate their teaching midcourse rather than waiting for feedback at the end of the term. Midterm feedback from students gives professors a chance to adjust their courses to improve learning and student satisfaction.

Read Online (Requires an RIT Account)

Question 1

Communication between the instructor and me is clear in this course.

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree
Question 2

Optional: Explain your answer about communication with the instructor.

Question 3

Communication between students is clear in this course.

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree
Question 4

Optional: Explain your answer about communication between students.

Question 5

The materials in this course are appropriate.

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree
Question 6

Optional: Explain your answer about materials in this course.

Question 7

The difficulty level and pace of this course are appropriate for me.

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree
Question 8

Optional: Explain your answer about the level of difficulty in this course.

Question 9

The homework and projects help me learn the information in this course.

Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree
Question 10

Optional: Explain your answer about the homework and projects in this course.

Question 11

What is best about this course?

Question 12

What is worst about this course?

Faculty/Staff Professional Development

Faculty Town Hall Meeting (11/20/15)

Faculty Teaching and Scholarship Awards

For more information about these awards, please see the Award Guidelines below.

2020 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers
Jennifer Swartzenberg

A lecturer at NTID Science and Mathematics department, Jennifer Swartzenberg’s primary role at NTID has been tutoring NTID-supported students enrolled in College of Science (COS) chemistry classes since 2013. Her exemplary work as a tutor was recognized by her chair, NTID and COS colleagues, and her students.  Her collaboration with COS School of Chemistry and Materials Science is notable, especially her participation in an NTID-COS research collaboration addressing language access involving NTID-supported students to better understand the complexity of chemistry.  A COS colleague notes that Ms. Swartzenberg “gives generously of her time, has had lots of experience in the classroom, and truly cares about her students’ education.”

2020 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers
Lisa Johnston

Lisa Johnston, a lecturer at NTID American Sign Language and Interpreting Education (ASLIE) department since 2015, has been recognized by her students and colleagues for her effective teaching style in the classroom. Also impressive is her extensive involvement with various curriculum development efforts within her department.  A student noted, in her letter of support toward Ms. Johnston’s nomination, that she “cares deeply for her students.  She makes sure to provide us with all the resources available for us to succeed … I admire her teaching style … she is prepared and ready to go” when coming to classes.  One of Ms. Johnston’s colleagues stated that she “…demonstrated an enthusiastic and personal excellence in teaching and learning.”

2019 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Tenured Faculty
Dr. Vincent Samar

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Tenured Faculty winner Dr. Vincent SamarA professor in the NTID Liberal Studies Department, Dr. Vincent Samar is co-director of the NIH-funded RIT Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) – a scientist-in-training program for deaf and hard-of-hearing undergraduates.  Dr. Samar is a tutor for research methods courses required for bachelor degree-bound psychology students and is an instructor for senior-level projects in psychology.  His academic efforts are recognized by numerous students, both past and present.  These students consider him a valued mentor, crediting him with laying the foundation for their success in graduate school and their professional lives.  

2019 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty
Dr. Viet Le

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty winner Dr. Viet LeAs an assistant professor in the NTID Science and Mathematics Department, Dr. Viet Le seeks to tailor difficult-to-teach concepts to visual-based approaches in the classroom.  His innovative approaches help his students better develop their understanding of new materials.  He implements active learning techniques to promote understanding among students.  Dr. Le is also a mentor to several students in his department’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program – a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant. 

2019 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers
Sarah Sarchet

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers winner Sarah SarchetA senior lecturer in the NTID Science and Mathematics Department, Ms. Sarah Sarchet is a well-respected instructor and tutor for biology and laboratory science courses.  Ms. Sarchet’s ability to adapt her teaching and tutoring style to meet the needs of all students, regardless of degree level and communication preference, is appreciated by her students and colleagues.  She also is a mentor to many students outside of her classroom and to future teachers in the classroom.  A former student, in her letter of recommendation, stated that Ms. Sarchet is a “highly dedicated professional who knows how to motivate her students to strive for excellence.”

2019 NTID Pre-tenured Scholarship Award
Matthew Dye

NTID Pre-tenured Scholarship Award winner Matthew DyeSince arriving at RIT/NTID three years ago, Dr. Matt Dye has overseen nine deaf or hard-of-hearing students in his deaf lab, as well as multiple deaf or hard-of-hearing graduate students, post-baccalaureates and postdocs as well.  Students who work in Dr. Dye’s lab serve critical roles in the research process and have opportunities to engage in multiple facets of externally funded research: from training in ethical conduct to lab skills to writing.  Currently PI on two NSF awards and one NIH award, Dr. Dye’s research primarily focuses on selective visual attention in deaf individuals and currently includes temporal aspects of visual attention in deaf children. 

2018 Teaching/Tutoring Award for Non-Tenure Track Faculty
Michael Kane

Teaching/Tutoring Award for Non-Tenure Track Faculty winner Michael KaneSenior Lecturer Michael “Mike” Kane from the Department of Business Studies is the 2018 Teaching/Tutoring Award winner for Non-Tenure Track Faculty.  Mike has been utilizing emergent technologies in his classroom resulting in varied approaches to content delivery in his classroom.  His teaching style has evolved so that now he turns the ownership of learning over to his students, guiding them to develop their own video recorded lectures and concept map study guides for his courses.  He is committed to his students’ success and is treasured by his department. 

2017 Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty
Jason Nordhaus

Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty winner Jason NordhausDr. Jason Nordhaus from the Department of Science and Mathematics is the 2017 Teaching/Tutoring Award winner for Pre-Tenure Faculty.  He teaches both in the classroom and through his research and collaborations where he exposes students to projects in astrophysical research.  Through his tutoring and teaching Dr. Nordhaus strives to create independent, logical problem solvers who can creatively contribute to society. 

2017 Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers
Kathleen Szczepanek

Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers winner Kathleen SzczepanekThe 2017 Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers goes to Ms. Kathleen Szczepanek from the Department of Business Studies.  Her reflective approach to teaching, her dedication to and support of student success, and the great respect she has garnered from her peers is why she is a valued member of the faculty.   Her students recognize, appreciate, and commend the impact she has made on their education and their career.

2017 NTID Tenured Scholarship Award
Dr. Vincent Samar

NTID Tenured Scholarship Award winner Dr. Vincent SamarDr. “Vince” Samar, Associate Professor in the Department of Liberal Studies, has made significant contributions to the scholarship of discovery including diverse fields in deaf health research, social determinants of health, cognitive development, and attentional enhancement among a few other topics of special interest. Since 2012, Dr. Samar has taught and mentored RIT Psychology baccalaureate students, as well as taught Senior Project in Psychology to 24 deaf out of 26 total undergraduate students resulting in numerous poster presentations and research projects as co-authors. “Dr. Samar has a record of prodigious scholarship, including 63 publications in refereed journal as well as dozens of presentations at local, regional, national and international conferences.” Most recently, his goals have turned to seeking and writing funds to completely renovate the NTID research lab facilities to better support research experiences in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience for future RIT students.

2017 NTID Pre-tenured Scholarship Award
Dr. Bonnie Jacob

NTID Pre-tenured Scholarship Award winner Dr. Bonnie JacobSince 2010, Dr. Bonnie Jacob, Assistant Professor in the Department of Science and Mathematics, has advised 11 deaf or hard-of-hearing students in undergraduate mathematics research. She has co-authored refereed journal articles with six students. Dr. Jacob’s area of study is graph theory, which defines relationships between various objects. “She brings to work a strong background in STEM-focused research and has succeeded thus far in working with our students to expose research concepts, thereby helping them to further develop their analytical thinking skills.” Dr. Jacob has been awarded several internal awards that have involved students in research projects leading to their conference presentations as well as publications. Mathematics research with students is her primary passion.

2016 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Tenured Faculty
Keith Mousley

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Tenured Faculty winner Keith MousleyAs a great role model and exceptional educator, Keith “Moose” Mousley, Associate Professor in the Department of Science and Mathematics, is the 2016 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award winner for Tenured Faculty. His relaxed teaching style is constantly evolving based on research and his vast experience working with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing students. He uses humor to keep them interested and actively engaged in classroom learning. He has an open door policy to tutor both current and former students, sharing his passion for math with everyone.

2016 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-tenure Faculty
Dr. Austin Gehret

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-tenure Faculty winner Dr. Austin GehretThe 2016 Teaching/Tutoring Award winner for Pre-tenure is Dr. Austin Gehret, Assistant Professor in the Department of Science and Mathematics. He is a tremendous asset to both the NTID and RIT communities. Serving as a support faculty for Deaf and hard of hearing students taking a variety of biochemistry courses in the College of Science, Dr. Gehret was able to use that experience to shape his associate-level Laboratory Science Technology biotechnology courses in a way that not only provides hands-on experience that is vital for success in biotechnology related careers, it prepares students for success in their future RIT biochemistry courses. He also serves as a co-advisor for a graduate student. Dr. Gehret’s patience with and respect for students, puts them at ease as he helps them succeed in the classroom and at their Co-op placements. 

2016 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers
Eric Kunsman

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers winner Eric KunsmanThe 2016 Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers goes to Eric Kunsman in the Visual Communications Studies Department. He culls from his own experience the value of hard work, determination and respect and aims to instill those qualities in his students. His ability to be creative in the classroom can be seen in his use of “Time Wasting Tickets”, developed to improve his students’ time management skills and as a way to teach them to become self-motivated, productive member of the workforce. He is well respected by both his peers and students. 

2016 NTID Tenured Scholarship Award
Dr. Gerald Berent

NTID Tenured Scholarship Award winner Dr. Gerald BerentDr. Gerald Berent, Professor in the Department of Liberal Studies, has significantly advanced the field of language acquisition in deaf and hard of hearing individuals through his 36-year outstanding track record of research. His colleagues have noted that his work in this area has informed generations of both faculty and students. His efforts to understand the impact of secondary disabilities and ADHD on DHH students' abilities to learn effectively have been transformative. Dr. Berent’s creation of the Supporting English Acquisition (SEA) website has been a great contribution and tool for English language teachers everywhere. He has also shared his research findings and teaching methodologies through over 50 publications in refereed journals and book chapters, 25 technical reports and publications in newsletters and bulletins. He has also given over 66 presentations at national and international symposia/conferences. Dr. Berent has obtained several grants to further his research, totaling over $800K.

His colleagues have also noted that Dr. Berent's scholarship in English language acquisition in DHH students and his dedication to sharing and applying it in NTID classrooms and classrooms across the world is simply outstanding. His passion for the scholarly process and its role in Deaf education is limitless. In addition to his own research and publication, he dedicates countless hours supporting the scholarly efforts of others. In the role of advisor, mentor, reviewer, editor and NTID IRB committee chair, Dr. Berent tirelessly works to share his expertise and promote the work of other scholars. He demonstrates energy, enthusiasm and creativity, combined with a solid professional base of knowledge to empower his students.

2016 NTID Pre-tenured Scholarship Award
Dr. Campbell McDermid

NTID Pre-tenured Scholarship Award winner Dr. Campbell McDermidDr. Campbell McDermid, Assistant Professor in the American Sign Language and Interpreting Education Department received the NTID Pre-tenured Scholarship Award. Dr. McDermid has made significant contributions in the field of interpreter education and sign language teaching, through a book on ASL paraphrasing, and several peer-reviewed articles. He has been invited to many presentations worldwide to share his findings.

Dr. McDermid has involved several undergraduate and graduate students in his research projects, and has provided them with important skills and experiences to obtain graduate training in sign language and interpreting research. He has also served as an advisor and consultant for several students in the program. Dr. Campbell McDermid has obtained several grants, including one to examine International Sign Acquisition. McDermid’s scholarship in the field of sign language interpreting has significantly advanced the training of sign language interpreters internationally.

2015 NTID Pre-tenured Teaching and Tutoring Award
Gary Behm

NTID Pre-tenured Teaching and Tutoring Award winner Gary BehmGary Behm, assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Studies, received the NTID Pre-tenured Teaching and Tutoring Award. “Gary wears many different hats here at the institute, and his teaching/tutoring is highly recognized by his peers and his students. The committee was impressed at the amount of energy that Gary puts into everything he does, and while his workload is split between two areas, he commits well over 100% of his time to both. He is a role model for many students and I would say faculty as well.” 

2015 NTID Tenured Teaching and Tutoring Award
Mark Pfuntner

NTID Tenured Teaching and Tutoring Award winner Mark PfuntnerMark Pfuntner, associate professor in the Department of Business Studies, received the NTID Tenured Teaching and Tutoring Award. According to the committee, “Mark is integral to the support and success of the cross registered students there. He embraces a teaching/tutoring philosophy that goes above and beyond the normal classroom approach. He demonstrates energy, enthusiasm and creativity, combined with a solid professional base of knowledge to empower his students.

2015 NTID Pre-tenure Scholarship Award
Dr. Deirdre Schlehofer

NTID Pre-tenure Scholarship Award winner Dr. Deirdre SchlehoferDr. Deirdre Schlehofer, assistant professor in the Department of American Sign Language and Interpreter Education, received the AY2014-2015 NTID Pre-tenure Scholarship Award. The selection committee cited the following: “In her work, Dr. Schlehofer involves ASLIE and RIT deaf and hard-of-hearing students and serves as a model for involving students in scholarly activities. Her impact on students is high as a result of engaging students in her projects, serving as a mentor to students through natural interaction in the research environment, and utilizing practical research that students can relate to.”

2014 NTID Scholarship Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty
Gary Behm

NTID Scholarship Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty winner Gary BehmGary involved 29 students in his research up to this point and serves as an excellent model involving students in scholarly activities. Many of these students benefitted by receiving their cooperative experience through the CAT Innovation Lab at different companies. Students gain greater awareness of the research process by using Gary’s approach as a model. Gary engages students in the projects and serves as a mentor to students through the natural interaction in the research environment. He utilizes practical research ideas that students can relate to. He had 11 internal presentations and 28 external presentations and 13 patents for his work through IBM and 5 submitted through RIT.

2014 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers
Stacey Davis

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers winner Stacey DavisThe committee unanimously agreed that Stacey was the "stand-out" candidate in the pool of candidates. Her letter of support from her Chair Matt Lynn was one of the strongest statements we had seen. Her personal statement was also impressive and showed her commitment to doing whatever it takes to help students succeed. Many people noted that her workweek includes regular Sunday review sessions for students she works with. She is a role model for others in our opinion. 

2014 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-tenure Faculty
Scot Atkins

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-tenure Faculty winner Scot AtkinsScot was clearly student centered and goes above and beyond to support student success. He too had outstanding SRS ratings and his letters of support were great. The committee was also impressed that his nomination for the award came from an RIT faculty member.

2014 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Tenured Faculty
Brian Trager

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Tenured Faculty winner Brian TragerBrian submitted an impressive personal statement, outstanding SRS evaluations and a wonderful letter of support provided by his chairperson. While the other candidate was also very qualified, the personal connection that Brian makes with so many students was the deciding factor for us.

2013 NTID Scholarship Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty
Dr. Raja S. Kushalnagar

NTID Scholarship Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty winner Dr. Raja S. Kushalnagar

Student Involvement:

  • Involved 11 students in his research up to this point- serves as an excellent model involving students in scholarly activities.
  • Patiently instructs his research students.
  • Students have been involved in three different research projects overall.
  • He has students present at conferences.

Student Impact:

  • The focus of his research efforts revolves around visual learners that directly impact our students.
  • Students gain greater awareness of their own accessibility challenges in the classroom through their research experiences.
  • Enables students to be immersed in research.
  • He serves as a mentor to students through the natural interaction in the research environment.
  • Provides training in research methods as his investment in student’s future.
  • Implements solutions based on research findings, such as using real-time replay for missed information after finding there is missed information through visual learning from his eye-tracking research.

Dissemination:

  • Consistent dissemination activities, papers at a variety of conferences including the ACM Special Interest Group for Computer Science Education (SIGCSE), ACM Special Interest Group for  Information Technology Education (SIGITE), and other conferences in accessible technology (RESENA and ASSETS).
  • Presentations at international and national level conferences.

Overall Rank/Summary:  Average Rank of 5, Outstanding

  • Collaborates with other faculty to pursue his research efforts./li>
  • PhD in Computer Science
  • Obtained grants, including as a PI for the NSF Grant on Collaborative Captioning totalling $80,146.00
  • “He is deeply engaged in research and involves other faculty and NTID students with the many research opportunities he has pursued.  He has been a great asset in explaining research methodologies and supporting students and other faculty members.” -Letter of Support from David Lawrence/li>
2013 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers
Carla Deibel

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Lecturers winner Carla DeibelOne of the comments that was often written in her letters of support from her chairperson and her colleague was that she was a "leader", even though she is a lecturer among her tenured and tenure track colleagues. Her workload as a lecturer not only includes an incredibly large number tutoring hours with a wide variety of science students, but she is also the coordinator for the B.S. Support Team in the COS. No other coordinator role is held by a lecturer. In her letter from Dr. Sandra Connelly, a professor in the COS, she was described as one of the "greatest tutors/teachers at RIT!"

She not only successfully supports the students in professor Connelly's classes, but she is also working as a part of a RCFTL project with Sandi and Matt Lynn, where her years of expertise make her an invaluable member of the project. Her letters from students not only praise her skill in tutoring, but also her indepth knowledge of the medical career paths that science students dream about.  Her career advising shows an deep understanding of the fields that her students are interested in pursuing.  She gives them honest advice and encourages them to work hard to achieve their goals. Her SRS results are extremely strong, ranging from 4.6 to 5.0.

2013 NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty
Annemarie Ross

NTID Teaching/Tutoring Award for Pre-Tenure Faculty winner Annemarie RossHer personal statement was inspiring to all of us as she identified her teaching approach to that of Anne Sullivan, the teacher behind Helen Keller's successes and she truly is motivated to make a difference in the lives of her science students. One comment from her Chairperson stood out when he described her as a "treasure". Students and colleagues alike respect and appreciate her endless hours of dedication to her students and her passion for science.

She left her industry position at IBM to "give back to the deaf community," and her efforts at NTID have truly reflected that commitment. Her letters of support (from faculty and students) were impressive, especially the one from her colleague Todd Pagano. He clearly holds Annemarie is the highest regard, stating that "everything she does so clearly warrants recognition by the institute". She challenges her students with high (but fair) expectations and often leads by example, inspiring students to share her passion and believe that they can achieve that same success. Extremely strong SRS results ranging from 4.7 to 5.0.

  1. Awards selection committee structure
    • There will be two selection committees to review NTID award candidates:
      • One committee to evaluate teaching/tutoring awards (3 awards). This committee will be known as the Teaching/Tutoring Awards Committee (TTAC).
      • One committee to evaluate scholarship awards (2 awards). This committee will be known as the Scholarship Awards Committee (SAC).

      Both the TTAC and the SAC will consist of five members. The TTAC will include at least one tenured faculty member, one pre-tenure tenure-track faculty member, and one lecturer as well as at least one member from each of the four academic areas identified in the tenure and promotion guidelines. The SAC will include at least one tenured faculty member and one pre-tenure tenure-track faculty member as well as at least one member from each of the four academic areas identified in the tenure and promotion guidelines. The SAC will not include lecturers on its membership.

      The normal term for each committee member will be two years. For the first term, in order to create a staggered term structure, three members will serve two-year terms and two will serve three-year terms.

  2. Award nomination process
    • Anyone may nominate an individual for any of the awards by submitting the candidate’s name and a brief rationale for the nomination.
    • There will be an online nomination form that describes eligibility for each award.
    • The form will ask for the following information:
      • Nominee’s name
      • Nominee’s department
      • Name and contact information of nominator
      • In which courses have you observed the nominee (for teaching/tutoring awards)
      • What makes this faculty member’s teaching/tutoring outstanding (for teaching/tutoring awards)
      • What makes this faculty member’s research/scholarship outstanding (for scholarship awards)
      • How the nominee’s scholarship involves/impacts students (for scholarship awards)
  3. Timelines/due dates


    Teaching/Tutoring Awards

    • Call for nominations in weeks 3 and 4 of Fall Semester
    • Nomination deadline, Friday of 5th week of Fall Semester
    • The TTAC contacts nominees by the Friday of 6th week of the Fall Semester.
    • Documentation from the nominee due by the Wednesday  before Thanksgiving in November
    • Recommendations made to NTID administration by the Friday of 1st week of February
    • Awards presented at State of the Institute presentation
       

    Scholarship Awards

    • Call for nominations in weeks 1 and 2 Fall Semester
    • Nominations due Friday of 3rd week of Fall Semester
    • The SAC contacts nominees during the 4th week of the Fall Semester
    • Documentation due by the Friday of 5th week of Fall Semester
    • Award recommendations made by the Friday of 8th week of Fall Semester
    • Award recipient contacted October 31st so that the individual can prepare any further documentation for the RIT-wide Trustees Scholarship Award presented at the State of the Institute presentation (The college selection process begins in November.)
       
    ** Timelines are abbreviated to allow the recipient to be considered for the RIT-wide Trustees Scholarship Award.
     
  4. Eligibility requirements for each award
    1. Tenured Teaching/Tutoring Award
      • Completed at least seven years at NTID by June 30th of the year in which the award is given
      • Must be tenured
      • Must be a full-time employee with primary responsibility for teaching/tutoring (teaching or balanced portfolio)
      • The seven years of teaching/tutoring do not have to be contiguous. They can be interrupted by service-such as Department Head or by official leave.
      • Candidates who already received the NTID Pre-Tenure Teaching/Tutoring award are eligible.
      • The nominee shall be a full-time faculty member for the entire year in which the award is given and cannot be on official leave for any of this period.
      • The candidate shall not have been the recipient of the award in the preceding seven years.
      • Committee members shall not be eligible for nomination in the years in which they serve, but may resign to become eligible if nominated. Such members will be replaced by the person who received the second highest number of votes in the original ballot.
         

      The recipient of this award will be formally nominated for the RIT-wide Eisenhart Award by the NTID Selection Committee. (Note: Due to the Eisenhart Award nomination timeline, the NTID recipient will be formally nominated for the following year’s Eisenhart Award competition).

    2. Pre-tenure Teaching/Tutoring Award
      • Completed six years or less at NTID by June 30th of the year in which the award is given
      • Must be tenure-track
      • Must be a full-time employee with primary responsibility for teaching/tutoring (teaching or balanced portfolio)
      • The nominee shall be a full-time faculty member for the entire year in which the award is given, and cannot be on official leave for any of this period.
      • The candidate can only win this award once.
      • Committee members shall not be eligible for nomination in the years in which they serve, but may resign to become eligible if nominated. Such members will be replaced by the person who received the second highest number of votes in the original ballot.
         

      The recipient of this award will be formally nominated for the RIT-wide Richard & Virginia Eisenhart Provost Award by the NTID Selection Committee. (Note: Due to the Richard & Virginia Eisenhart Provost Award nomination timeline, the NTID recipient will be formally nominated for the following year’s Richard & Virginia Eisenhart Provost Award competition)

    3. Non-Tenure Track Teaching/Tutoring Award
      • Must be non-tenure track
      • The candidate must have completed at least three years teaching full-time at NTID by June 30 of the year in which the award is given.
      • Must have primary responsibility for teaching/tutoring
      • The nominee shall be a full-time faculty member for all of the year in which the award is given, and will not be on official leave for any of this period.
      • The candidate shall not have been the recipient of the award in the preceding seven years.
      • Committee members shall not be eligible for nomination in the years in which they serve, but may resign to become eligible if nominated. Such members will be replaced by the person who got the second highest number of votes in the original ballot.
         

      The recipient of this award will be formally nominated for the RIT-wide Non-Tenure-Track Teaching Award by the NTID Selection Committee. (Note: Due to the RIT-wide Non-Tenure Track Teaching Award nomination timeline, the NTID recipient will be formally nominated for the following year’s RIT-wide Non-Tenure Track Teaching Award competition.)

    4. Tenured Scholarship Award
      • This award recognizes NTID faculty members who have demonstrated an outstanding track record of academic scholarship directly involving students over a period of at least three years while at NTID.
      • In accordance with the Trustees Scholarship Award, it must be scholarship which “is integral to, and not separated from, all aspects of a student's educational experience at RIT” (Category of One University: RIT Strategic Plan for 2005-2015, p. 8) and which fits within one or more of the following classifications: teaching/pedagogy, application, integration, or discovery.”
      • Must be tenured.
      • Must be a full-time employee.
      • Candidates who already received the NTID Pre-Tenure Scholarship award are eligible.
      • Committee members shall not be eligible for nomination in the years in which they serve, but may resign to become eligible if nominated. Such members will be replaced by the person who received the second highest number of votes in the original ballot.
         

      The recipient of this award will be formally nominated for the RIT-wide Trustees Scholarship Award by the NTID Selection Committee.

    5. Pre-tenure Scholarship Award
      • This award recognizes NTID faculty members who have demonstrated an outstanding track record of academic scholarship directly involving students over a period of at least two years while at NTID.
      • In accordance with the Trustees Scholarship Award, it must be scholarship which “is integral to, and not separated from, all aspects of a student's educational experience at RIT” (Category of One University: RIT Strategic Plan for 2005-2015, p. 8) and “which fits within one or more of the following classifications: teaching/pedagogy, application, integration, or discovery.”
      • Nominees must have completed at least two years at NTID by June 30th of the year in which the award is given.
      • Must be tenure-track.
      • Must be a full-time employee.
      • The candidate can win this award only once.
      • Committee members shall not be eligible for nomination in the years in which they serve, but may resign to become eligible if nominated. Such members will be replaced by the person who received the second highest number of votes in the original ballot.
         
  5. Required supplemental documentation to support, in addition to the nomination form, to complete the process
     

    Teaching/Tutoring awards:

    • Letter of support/eligibility from the nominee’s chairperson
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • A summary of SRS evaluations (all courses from the most recent three years). If the nominee has been teaching/tutoring for less than three years, then a summary of all evaluations for all the years at NTID are required.
    • One letter of support from a colleague
    • One to two letters of support from students (current, past, or alumni)
    • A 1-2 page narrative describing how the nominee’s teaching/tutoring has had an impact on students’ success
       

    Scholarship awards:

    • Letter of support/eligibility from the nominee’s chairperson
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • A 1-2 page narrative (written by the nominee) describing how the nominee’s research either has an impact on students and teaching/tutoring and/or involves students directly
    • No more than two letters of support from peers familiar with the nominee’s research/scholarship (letters can be internal or external to NTID)

For all awards, finalists may be interviewed by the respective Awards Committee or asked for additional materials.

Student Outcomes Assessment

Student Ratings (SRATE and SRS)

Accessing RIT N01 View

If you are a faculty or staff member outside of NTID who needs to be able to see the names of deaf or hard-of-hearing students as a business function of your job, you need access to RIT N01 View.

Currently, all faculty have access (in the Faculty Center) to see the number of deaf or hard-of-hearing students enrolled in their classes. RIT N01 View allows the user to view the specific names of those deaf and hard-of-hearing students who are sponsored by NTID. Based on individual user security, the viewer will be able to identify deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the views that they can already access.

If you have a legitimate business need to know the specific names of deaf or hard-of-hearing students, you must fill out this form and return it to NTID's Associate Dean for Academic Administration (Katie Schmitz) to initiate the review and approval process. After she reviews your form with her committee, she will notify you and ITS of the decision.