Applied Computer Technology Associate in applied science degree

219b7799-636c-4fe7-b3fd-af1025655943 | 82979

Overview

Computers are important to all parts of the economy, and the number of careers that involve work with computers is constantly expanding. Students in the associate in applied science (AAS) degree program in applied computer technology take courses to prepare them for careers that involve maintaining computer software and hardware, installing and maintaining computer networks, and working with a variety of computer applications. This program is available for qualified deaf and hard of hearing students. 

The associate in applied science (AAS) degree in applied computer technology, offered by RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, leads to immediate entry-level positions in the computing industry. It prepares you for a career in computer support occupations that involves:

  • Installing, maintaining, upgrading and repairing computer hardware and software.
  • Networking and security that allows computers to be secured and safely communicate and share resources with one another.

Concentrations

As a student in the applied computer technology program, you will select an area to specialize in by choosing a program concentration in either computer technical support or networking and cyber security.

Computer Technical Support Concentration: If you select this concentration, you will develop skills specific to working with people to solve their computer-related problems. These skills prepare you to work at a help desk responding to client's computer problems, and perform setup, upgrades and repairs to computers and computer peripherals.

Networking and Cyber Security Concentration: If you select this concentration, you will develop skills specific to network and network security support, including server set-up, support and administration; network set-up, troubleshooting and repair; identifying and implementing security policies; and installing appropriate hardware and software to support a secure and robust network.

Cooperative Education

As a student in the applied computer technology program, you will be required to complete a cooperative (co-op) work experience prior to graduation. You may schedule your co-op after completing your second-year academic requirements.

What does amazing look like?

Attend our Open House and you’ll get a pretty good idea.

Industries


  • Computer Networking

  • Internet and Software

  • Electronic and Computer Hardware

  • Manufacturing

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

Typical Job Titles

Computer Technician Computer Support Specialist
Network Technician Network Security Technician
Network Administrator Web Specialist
Web Developer Webmaster
Database Specialist

Curriculum

Applied Computer Technology (computer technical support concentration), AAS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NACT-150
Intro to PC Hardware
This course introduces the fundamental hardware concepts of Windows-based computers. The skills required to install, upgrade and maintain computers are presented. The course provides students with methodologies and hands-on activities related to the configuration, diagnosis, repair, upgrade, and preventive maintenance of computer hardware, input/output devices and data communications. Topics include the basic functions and use of test equipment, logical troubleshooting of internal system conflicts and faulty peripherals, and electrical safety.
3
NACT-151
Windows Operating Systems
This course is designed to acquaint students with the structure and function of windows-based operating systems and to provide the skills required to install, configure and maintain them. Topics include system concepts, system level commands, and commands relating to program, file and applications management. Students perform a variety of functions, including OS installation and configuration, application program installation and management, creation and management of directories and file structures, and partitioning and preparation of storage media.
3
NACT-155
Non-Windows Operating Systems
This course exposes students to Unix and other Unix-based operating systems such as Linux and Macintosh systems. It acquaints them with system services that are of interest to normal users, power users, and administrators. Students learn basic commands, scripting, and navigation from a terminal window and experience management of their user environment, files, and directories. Students are also exposed to administering some common aspects of the operating environments such as groups, users, privileges, and process management. There is also some exposure to the operating system's GUI interface.
3
NACT-160
Networking Essentials
This course introduces students to the basics of user security on their computers as well as the basics of computer networking. Students will learn the importance of user security and some of the tools and procedures needed to protect and secure their information, computers and networks against attack. Basic concepts and terminology of wired and wireless networking including networking hardware, media, communication technologies and protocols, and network management will be covered. Lab activities will develop skills in installing, configuring, managing, and troubleshooting a basic network.
3
NACT-161
Client-Server Networks
This course continues the concepts of computer networking with an emphasis on the networking client/server model. Various networking operating systems (NOS) will be examined as well as both peer-to-peer and client/server network applications. NOS hardware and software security tools are investigated and students learn how to install, configure, update/maintain and troubleshoot both the client/server hardware devices as well as the appropriate security tools.
3
NACT-170
Intro to Web Development
This course introduces students to designing and coding a multipage web site. Topics include an overview of the internet and web addressing, coding valid HTML and CSS, design principles, implementation on a server, and use of web development software. The use of hyperlinks, graphics, and multimedia in web pages will be covered.
3
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
UWRT-150
FYW: Writing Seminar (WI)
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.
3
 
ASL-Deaf Cultural Studies†
0
 
LAS Elective‡
3
 
LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
NACT-200
Help Desk Support
This course focuses on key information and proficiencies needed to support users, including troubleshooting, problem solving, successful communication, determining a client's needs, and using appropriate people skills.
3
NACT-230
Introduction to Programming
This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and terminology of computer programming. Emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving skills in designing and writing simple computer programs. The course covers such topics as developing flowcharts, algorithms and pseudocode, and introduces students to variables, operators, conditional statements, looping statements, data structures, error-handling and debugging, and user interface design. The course assumes no programming background.
3
NACT-235
Intro to Database Applications
In this course students will learn to create database tables, queries, forms and reports using a leading database software product for personal computers. Students will also learn how to design a database from user specifications, and to form basic SQL commands.
3
NACT-240
The World of Work
The goal of the course is to provide students with the business-related skills to acquire a cooperative or permanent job, and the personal and social skills to succeed on the job. Topics related to workplace communication and relationships, as well as financial management, employer expectations, and personal goal setting will also be covered. The course will also include the development of job search skills, resume writing and interviewing, along with skills in word processing, spreadsheets and presentation software as needed in the workplace.
3
NACT-250
Computer and Data Security
This course will explore the unique computer and data security issues encountered by computer technicians. Using current computer security tools and procedures, students will develop more advanced skills in finding and eliminating security weaknesses, breaches, and malware programs. Computer security incident response procedures will also be introduced in this course. Hands-on lab activities will be used to reinforce concepts and to provide real-life situations that give students experience in handling suspected security breaches.
3
NACT-251
Digital Systems Integration
This course explores the technologies of control/automated systems. Some of these technologies include, but are not limited to, the control and management of security and surveillance systems, lighting control systems, access control systems, communication systems, assistive technologies and other automated features. This course will provide a basis for connecting, configuring, testing, controlling, and maintaining these systems.
3
NACT-295
ACT Technical Capstone
This course provides an opportunity for students to work on technical projects that integrate the skills they have developed in earlier Applied Computer Technology courses. Students will work both independently and in teams to solve "real world" networking and computer support problems in a professional manner.
3
NACT-299
Co-op: Applied Computer Tech
This course provides students with a 350-hour work experience in the computer field. Students have an opportunity to gain experience on the job, to apply what they have learned in their course work, and to evaluate their own technical, communication, and interpersonal skills. Placement assistance is provided to help students find a relevant work experience.
0
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Third Year
NACT-252
Server Management and Security
Students taking the course will learn to implement and administer network servers by managing server devices, file systems, users and groups, and application software. Students will also learn how to monitor and fine-tune server security and performance and to implement backup and fault tolerance.
3
 
ACT Program Electives**
6
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
72

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† An ASL-Deaf Cultural Studies (AASASLDCS) course is required for graduation. It can be taken in any semester and can be taken at NTID or another college of RIT. In order to fulfill this requirement as part of the credit hours in the program, it can be a course approved for both AASASLDCS and an LAS Perspective or LAS Elective.

‡ NTID mathematics course NMTH-120 or higher. It is recommended that students take NMTH-140 Mathematics in Society.

** Please see list of ACT program electives below.

Applied Computer Technology (networking and cyber security concentration), AAS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NACT-150
Intro to PC Hardware
This course introduces the fundamental hardware concepts of Windows-based computers. The skills required to install, upgrade and maintain computers are presented. The course provides students with methodologies and hands-on activities related to the configuration, diagnosis, repair, upgrade, and preventive maintenance of computer hardware, input/output devices and data communications. Topics include the basic functions and use of test equipment, logical troubleshooting of internal system conflicts and faulty peripherals, and electrical safety.
3
NACT-151
Windows Operating Systems
This course is designed to acquaint students with the structure and function of windows-based operating systems and to provide the skills required to install, configure and maintain them. Topics include system concepts, system level commands, and commands relating to program, file and applications management. Students perform a variety of functions, including OS installation and configuration, application program installation and management, creation and management of directories and file structures, and partitioning and preparation of storage media.
3
NACT-155
Non-Windows Operating Systems
This course exposes students to Unix and other Unix-based operating systems such as Linux and Macintosh systems. It acquaints them with system services that are of interest to normal users, power users, and administrators. Students learn basic commands, scripting, and navigation from a terminal window and experience management of their user environment, files, and directories. Students are also exposed to administering some common aspects of the operating environments such as groups, users, privileges, and process management. There is also some exposure to the operating system's GUI interface.
3
NACT-160
Networking Essentials
This course introduces students to the basics of user security on their computers as well as the basics of computer networking. Students will learn the importance of user security and some of the tools and procedures needed to protect and secure their information, computers and networks against attack. Basic concepts and terminology of wired and wireless networking including networking hardware, media, communication technologies and protocols, and network management will be covered. Lab activities will develop skills in installing, configuring, managing, and troubleshooting a basic network.
3
NACT-161
Client-Server Networks
This course continues the concepts of computer networking with an emphasis on the networking client/server model. Various networking operating systems (NOS) will be examined as well as both peer-to-peer and client/server network applications. NOS hardware and software security tools are investigated and students learn how to install, configure, update/maintain and troubleshoot both the client/server hardware devices as well as the appropriate security tools.
3
NACT-170
Intro to Web Development
This course introduces students to designing and coding a multipage web site. Topics include an overview of the internet and web addressing, coding valid HTML and CSS, design principles, implementation on a server, and use of web development software. The use of hyperlinks, graphics, and multimedia in web pages will be covered.
3
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
UWRT-150
FYW: Writing Seminar
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.
3
 
ASL-Deaf Cultural Studies†
0
 
LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
NACT-200
Help Desk Support
This course focuses on key information and proficiencies needed to support users, including troubleshooting, problem solving, successful communication, determining a client's needs, and using appropriate people skills.
3
NACT-230
Introduction to Programming
This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and terminology of computer programming. Emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving skills in designing and writing simple computer programs. The course covers such topics as developing flowcharts, algorithms and pseudocode, and introduces students to variables, operators, conditional statements, looping statements, data structures, error-handling and debugging, and user interface design. The course assumes no programming background.
3
NACT-235
Intro to Database Applications
In this course students will learn to create database tables, queries, forms and reports using a leading database software product for personal computers. Students will also learn how to design a database from user specifications, and to form basic SQL commands.
3
NACT-240
The World of Work
The goal of the course is to provide students with the business-related skills to acquire a cooperative or permanent job, and the personal and social skills to succeed on the job. Topics related to workplace communication and relationships, as well as financial management, employer expectations, and personal goal setting will also be covered. The course will also include the development of job search skills, resume writing and interviewing, along with skills in word processing, spreadsheets and presentation software as needed in the workplace.
3
NACT-260
LAN WAN Design
This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with multi-protocol routers and multi-switched networks. The class includes basic router operations, architecture, and configuration; switched Ethernet networks; virtual LAN technology; configuration of switching devices; and troubleshooting. Students set up, wire, and configure expansion technologies in an internet work environment.
3
NACT-261
Network Security
This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of computer and data network security. Students will examine an infrastructure design process for securing computer systems and data networks, as well as methodologies and best practices for implementing security, security policies, security testing, and incident response. The underlying principles used to secure networks including security technologies, intrusion detection, authentication, and cryptography basics will be discussed. This course will also introduce students to network security planning, technology, and organization, and the legal and ethical issues associated with network security.
3
NACT-295
ACT Technical Capstone
This course provides an opportunity for students to work on technical projects that integrate the skills they have developed in earlier Applied Computer Technology courses. Students will work both independently and in teams to solve "real world" networking and computer support problems in a professional manner.
3
NACT-299
Co-op: Applied Computer Tech
This course provides students with a 350-hour work experience in the computer field. Students have an opportunity to gain experience on the job, to apply what they have learned in their course work, and to evaluate their own technical, communication, and interpersonal skills. Placement assistance is provided to help students find a relevant work experience.
0
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Third Year
NACT-262
Fundamentals of System Administration
This course extends students' skills at securing and managing networks and servers. Students taking the course will practice implementing and administering networked servers in multiple operating systems by managing server devices, file system, users and groups, and application software. Students will design and test custom LAN environments, using both physical and virtual computers and servers. Students will also learn to secure shared data across platforms, securing both the physical/virtual network environment and the operating systems' shared resources.
3
 
ACT Program Electives**
6
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
72

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† An ASL-Deaf Cultural Studies (AASASLDCS) course is required for graduation. It can be taken in any semester and can be taken at NTID or another college of RIT. In order to fulfill this requirement as part of the credit hours in the program, it can be a course approved for both AASASLDCS and an LAS Perspective or LAS Elective.

‡ NTID mathematics course NMTH-120 or higher. It is recommended that students take NMTH-140 Mathematics in Society.

** Please see list of ACT program electives below.

ACT program electives
NACC-130
Personal Finance
This course provides students with information and resources needed to understand the creation and implementation of a budget, use of credit and borrowing money responsibly, financial rights and ways to safeguard their money, and factors used to determine their readiness to buy a home or make other major purchases. Information on financial institutions such as banks, credit unions, and savings and loan organizations will also be covered. This course will provide students with basic financial literacy so they can develop sound financial management of their personal income as well as an understanding of the economic events that can influence their financial well being and society as a whole.
NACT-250
Computer and Data Security§
This course will explore the unique computer and data security issues encountered by computer technicians. Using current computer security tools and procedures, students will develop more advanced skills in finding and eliminating security weaknesses, breaches, and malware programs. Computer security incident response procedures will also be introduced in this course. Hands-on lab activities will be used to reinforce concepts and to provide real-life situations that give students experience in handling suspected security breaches.
NACT-251
Digital Systems Integration§
This course explores the technologies of control/automated systems. Some of these technologies include, but are not limited to, the control and management of security and surveillance systems, lighting control systems, access control systems, communication systems, assistive technologies and other automated features. This course will provide a basis for connecting, configuring, testing, controlling, and maintaining these systems.
NACT-255
A+ Certification Prep
This course will prepare students to pass the two certification tests necessary to earn CompTIA's A+ Certification. Students will review material from previous courses and complete practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the exam. In addition to text book(s), students will be required to purchase two certification exam vouchers for this course. To pass the course, students must pass both certification exams.
NACT-260
LAN WAN Design†
This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with multi-protocol routers and multi-switched networks. The class includes basic router operations, architecture, and configuration; switched Ethernet networks; virtual LAN technology; configuration of switching devices; and troubleshooting. Students set up, wire, and configure expansion technologies in an internet work environment.
NACT-261
Network Security†
This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of computer and data network security. Students will examine an infrastructure design process for securing computer systems and data networks, as well as methodologies and best practices for implementing security, security policies, security testing, and incident response. The underlying principles used to secure networks including security technologies, intrusion detection, authentication, and cryptography basics will be discussed. This course will also introduce students to network security planning, technology, and organization, and the legal and ethical issues associated with network security.
NACT-265
Network+ Certification Prep
The course will prepare students to take and pass the CompTIA's Network+ Certification exam. Students will review material from previous courses and complete practice exams and troubleshooting exercises in preparation for the exam. In addition to textbook(s), students will be required to purchase a certification exam voucher for this course. Students must pass the certification exam to pass the course.
NACT-266
Network Defense Technologies
This course will provide students with a deeper understanding of the technologies used to defend a network against security attacks. Students will be introduced to the concepts, principles, types, and topologies of current and future defense technologies. Various defense methodologies associated with various Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS), and future technologies will be covered. Students will also learn best practices associated with remotely securing and accessing business resources.
NACT-270
Web Applications
This course continues to build students' skills in developing well-designed webpages using the most current web development tools. By creating server-side scripts combined with embedded SQL students will be able to build professional-quality, database-driven websites. Accessibility issues related to website development will also be emphasized. Only limited programming experience is required.
NACT-271
Client-Side Scripting
This course is an introduction to client-side scripting for the Internet using a common scripting language. Students will be introduced to the syntax of the scripting language, and then learn to build practical and interactive client-side applications.
NAIS-130
Raster and Vector Graphics
This course introduces students to the skills needed for the successful production and manipulation of raster and vector images using image creation and production software. Students will work in bitmap and vector applications, producing and editing with the tools and techniques offered by the software programs such as selection techniques, basic layer controls, digital masking, image correction and enhancement. Additional topics will include the relevance of image size, resolution and file format specifications when working with raster and vector images. Comprehension and correct usage of terminology and concepts are emphasized.
NAIS-160
Web Design I
This course introduces students to the fundamental skills needed to create designs that work on the World Wide Web. Students are introduced to the Internet, learn basic HTML programming for graphics, and legal issues of the Internet. Text based technology is used to separate design from content using templates and cascading style sheets (CSS). Topics such as image preparation, page design, site graphic design, navigation & linking, content, usability, speed, originality and audience are discussed. Students are expected to create web pages that demonstrate their understanding and use of basic application of the above topics.
NBUS-200
Orientation to Business
This course introduces students to a broad overview of the form and structure of multinational organizations. It provides students with a basic knowledge of the history, organization and operation of business and its particular vocabulary.
NBUS-227
Principles of Marketing
This course introduces the field of marketing and its focus on how consumer purchasing behavior impacts the marketplace (domestically and internationally). Emphasis will be placed on understanding the customers' needs and wants, marketing mix and its impact on the external market environment. Students will demonstrate the marketing concepts, principles and strategies through the development of a marketing plan.
NGRP-220
Videography
This course provides an overview of videography for the web. This is a basic digital video course that introduces the process and procedures involved in digital video production from start to finish. Students will be introduced to videography production techniques, camera operation and formats, digital non-linear editing, titling and lighting for video. Emphasis is on development of ideas, proper operation of video and computer equipment for productions and post-production of digital non-linear edited sequences and their adaptation to different presentation formats for online delivery.

 

§ Students taking the NCS concentration may take this course from the CTS concentration as an elective.

† Students taking the CTS concentration may take this course from the NCS concentration as an elective.

Admission Requirements

For the career-focused AAS Degree

  • 2 years of math required
  • 1 year of science required
  • English language skills as evidenced by application materials determine associate degree options.

Specific Requirements

Successful completion of a sampling experience in applied computer technology, either through the Summer Vestibule Program or equivalent career exploration course, is a prerequisite for this program, as are the following:

  • English: Placement into a First Year Writing course, such as the FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150). Students typically enter First Year Writing with reading scores equivalent to 130 or higher on the NTID Reading Test and writing scores of 67 or higher on the NTID Writing Test. However, students who complete AAS degrees typically enter NTID with reading scores above 98 on the NTID Reading Test and writing scores above 50 on the NTID Writing Test.
  • Mathematics: Placement into Mathematics in Society (NMTH-140) or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.
  • Science: Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least two years of high school science.

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