Harnessing the Data Revolution

RIT faculty and students conduct research on "Big Data" and the ability to discover patterns and make predictions from large amounts of data revolutionize almost every other scientific and technical field.

Applied Inverse Problems and Optimization

Current research in the unit involves developing mathematical frameworks to discern the properties of a system by working backward from known effects. Application areas include medicine, engineering, finance, earth science, and imaging and the focus is on investigating the impact of uncertainty in data, identification of cancer in soft tissues, estimation of material properties, identification of market volatility, and developing fast and reliable methods for large scale computational optimization.

Bernard Brooks headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Associate Head, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-5138
Nathan Cahill headshot
Associate Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director, Mathematical Modeling Program
585-475-5144
Carl Lutzer headshot
Director Honors Program
Honors Program
Academic Affairs
Professor, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-5133
George Thurston headshot
Professor
School of Physics and Astronomy
College of Science
Director of Physics MS Program
Program Faculty, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-4549

Applied Statistics and Data Analytics

Current work in the unit includes research and consulting in biostatistics, machine learning, data science, predictive analytics, signals processing, statistical education, and statistical/scientific inference with applications to biology, astrophysics, and engineering.

Mihail Barbosu headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director of Data and Predictive Analytics Center
585-475-2123
Nathan Cahill headshot
Associate Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director, Mathematical Modeling Program
585-475-5144
Carol Marchetti headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Minors Coordinator, Statistics
Undergraduate Program Coordinator, Applied Statistics
5854752515
Robert Parody headshot
Associate Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director, Applied Statistics MS Program
Associate Head, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-5288

Bioinformatics

Using modern computational tools and approaches the bioinformatics faculty conduct research on a broad variety of topics including molecular evolution, ecological modeling, cancer biology, and genomics.

Gregory Babbitt headshot
Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science
Bioinformatics Program Faculty
585-475-6246
Feng Cui headshot
Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science
Graduate Director of Bioinformatics
585-475-4115

Discrete Mathematics

Current work in the unit involves developing graph-based models of the brain to study the impact of concussions, improving and developing new graph-based algorithms for hyper-spectral image analysis, applying the growing concepts of complex network analysis to domain-based scientific problems, and applying algebraic techniques and methods to problems in cybersecurity.

Bernard Brooks headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Associate Head, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-5138
Bonnie Jacob headshot
Associate Professor
Department of Science and Mathematics
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Program Faculty, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-2275
Jobby Jacob headshot
Associate Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Associate Head, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-5146
James Marengo headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Minors Coordinator, Actuarial Science
585-475-6872

Dynamical Systems and Fluid Dynamics

Current work in the unit involves applying mathematical techniques of nonlinear dynamical systems to problems in fluid dynamics, climate modeling, population modeling, cell signaling dynamics, and more; developing mathematical models of thin film and interfacial flows with application to biological fluids, micro-fluidics devices, and industrial coating processes; gaining insights that lead to better prediction of hydrodynamic instabilities, such as turbulence, liquid fuel atomization, and liquid film breakup; devising novel computational methods to simulate fluid transport phenomena; and improving the current understanding of polymer flows and viscoelastic fluids.

Mihail Barbosu headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director of Data and Predictive Analytics Center
585-475-2123
Bernard Brooks headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Associate Head, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-5138
Nathan Cahill headshot
Associate Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director, Mathematical Modeling Program
585-475-5144
Michael Cromer headshot
Associate Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director, Applied and Computational Mathematics MS Program
585-475-4078
Carl Lutzer headshot
Director Honors Program
Honors Program
Academic Affairs
Professor, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-5133
George Thurston headshot
Professor
School of Physics and Astronomy
College of Science
Director of Physics MS Program
Program Faculty, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-4549
Steven Weinstein headshot
Department Head
Department of Chemical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering
Program Faculty, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-4299
Tamas Wiandt headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Undergraduate Program Coordinator
585-475-5767

Geometry, Relativity, and Gravitation

Current work in the unit includes applications of differential geometry, numerical solutions of partial differential equations, and statistical inference to problems related to general relativity and celestial mechanics. Einstein's general theory of relativity is studied as a description of the geometry of spacetime. Advanced numerical and computational techniques are used to solve the coupled, nonlinear, system of PDEs of General Relativity and Magneto-Hydrodynamics. As part of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, SMS faculty and researchers use statistical signal processing techniques to search for, identify and characterize gravitational-wave signals from astrophysical systems.

Mihail Barbosu headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Director of Data and Predictive Analytics Center
585-475-2123
Manuela Campanelli headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Program Faculty - PhD Program in Astrophysical Sciences and Technology (AST)
Director of Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation
Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS)
585-475-7752
Tamas Wiandt headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Undergraduate Program Coordinator
585-475-5767

Mathematics of Earth and Environmental Systems

Current work in the unit involves developing new mathematical techniques to study problems of geophysical fluid dynamics, climate modeling, extreme weather, coastal and natural hazards, and other complex systems arising in the study of Earth and environmental systems.

Multi-messenger and Multi-wavelength Astrophysics

RIT faculty conduct observational and theoretical research across a wide range of topics in multi-messenger and multi-wavelength astrophysics, utilizing a combination of observations spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, data from gravitational wave detectors, and supercomputer simulations. Current areas of research include numerical relativity and relativistic magnetohydrodynamics, gravitational wave data analysis, compact object binaries, accretion disks and jets, supernovae, and pulsars. RIT is a member of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Corporation and faculty are involved in several major collaborations including the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory Scientific Collaboration, the NANOGrav Pulsar Timing Array Consortium and the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.

The RIT Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation advances knowledge and discovery at the frontiers of relativistic astrophysics, gravitational physics, and cosmology, while pursuing new exciting research directions, in connection with new experiments and observations.

Manuela Campanelli headshot
Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Program Faculty - PhD Program in Astrophysical Sciences and Technology (AST)
Director of Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation
Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS)
585-475-7752
Jason Nordhaus headshot
Associate Professor
Department of Science and Mathematics
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Program Faculty, School of Mathematical Sciences
585-475-4202