Music and Technology Minor

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Overview

The music and technology minor includes courses in music theory, music history, contemporary and historical musical instrument technology, acoustics, audio engineering, music for media, and music performance. This minor provides students with an avenue to integrate their technological interests and skills with music.

Notes about this minor:

  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
  • Notations may appear in the curriculum chart below outlining pre-requisites, co-requisites, and other curriculum requirements (see footnotes).

Curriculum

Notes about this minor:

  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
  • Notations may appear in the curriculum chart below outlining pre-requisites, co-requisites, and other curriculum requirements (see footnotes).
Course
Required Courses
EEET-261
Fundamentals of Audio Engineering
This course provides a fundamental study of the technology and practice used in recording, editing, mixing, production, and distribution of sound. Topics include microphone types, selection and application the mixing console, mixing techniques and introduction to Signal Processing equipment and associated techniques, an introduction to the concepts relating to digital audio technology such as sampling, the Nyquist theorem, alias frequencies, quantization, dynamic range, compression and their applications will be covered. Topics include basics of digital audio, session creation, importing media, recording techniques, editing, mixing, and mastering. In addition, the course teaches how-to-listen sonic difference to appropriately apply the technical knowledge and to achieve highest sound quality.
Plus one of the following:
  FNRT-205
   Music Theory 1
This course is designed for the student who has basic musical literacy (ability to read music notation). In addition to the writing of melody, two-part counterpoint and four-part harmony, some attention will be given to the analysis of form and style. Because it is important that theoretical understanding be coordinated with musical application, time will be devoted to the development of musicianship. Consideration will be given to individual skills and abilities, hopefully allowing for the maximum development of each student. (Elementary music reading ability)
  FNRT-208
   Composing for Media
Composing for Media will guide the student through the process of creating original music to accompany a visual medium. The course begins by focusing on the aesthetics, terminology, procedures, and technical aspects of film scoring. As the course progresses, the skills acquired will progress towards a class project of scoring a short film or animation. By using a broad range of techniques including click tracks, spotting, scoring under dialogue, free timing, and the creative use of overlap cues, students will learn how to develop a dramatic concept for a score and how to synchronize it seamlessly to visual events. This course is applicable to musicians interested in scoring music to visual media as well as students with skills in the areas of audio engineering, film and animation and video gaming. No previous film scoring experience is required. Fundamental knowledge and a background in music will be introduced in the class topics. In addition to a good ear for music, a functional ability with MIDI sequencing, via DAW—a proficiency in the use of sample libraries and audio plug-ins and basic audio mixing—is expected. Entrance to the class requires instructor permission.
Electives
Choose three of the following:*
  FNRT-201
   Music in the U.S.
This course is a survey of music in the United States from the time of European colonization to the present. Particular emphasis is placed upon the question of what makes music distinctively American.
  FNRT-202
   Studies in World Music
A course designed to explore selected music cultures from North America, South America, Africa, India, Asia, East Asia, and Central and Southeastern Europe. The primary goal of the course will be to expand understanding of and perceptions about music both outside and within Western cultural traditions. In addition to class discussions, students will have opportunities for hands-on activities associated with the cultures studied.
  FNRT-203
  FNRT-204
  FNRT-208
   Composing for Media
Composing for Media will guide the student through the process of creating original music to accompany a visual medium. The course begins by focusing on the aesthetics, terminology, procedures, and technical aspects of film scoring. As the course progresses, the skills acquired will progress towards a class project of scoring a short film or animation. By using a broad range of techniques including click tracks, spotting, scoring under dialogue, free timing, and the creative use of overlap cues, students will learn how to develop a dramatic concept for a score and how to synchronize it seamlessly to visual events. This course is applicable to musicians interested in scoring music to visual media as well as students with skills in the areas of audio engineering, film and animation and video gaming. No previous film scoring experience is required. Fundamental knowledge and a background in music will be introduced in the class topics. In addition to a good ear for music, a functional ability with MIDI sequencing, via DAW—a proficiency in the use of sample libraries and audio plug-ins and basic audio mixing—is expected. Entrance to the class requires instructor permission.
  FNRT-209
  FNRT-210
   Bach, Handel and the Baroque
European society experienced many changes during the late 16th through the early 18th centuries, and music's role and development within the context of these changes was varied, and profound. This course explores the creation and performance of music within the context of European cultural, religious, political and artistic ideals from 1580 to 1750, culminating in in-depth discussion of the life and works of J. S. Bach and G. F. Handel.
  FNRT-211
  FNRT-212
   Electronic Music Production
This course explores the composition, arrangement, mixing, and mastering of modern electronic music. Topics include aesthetics of formal song structure and melodic and harmonic construction techniques, synthesis and sound design, using a digital audio workstation (DAW) to program musical elements using audio or MIDI, sound processing using effects such as equalization and compression, and introductory mastering techniques.
  FNRT-250
   RIT Singers
The RIT Singers is an experiential-learning course in which students learn music theory and historical context by learning pieces from the 16th century to the present and performing them at three major concerts a year. Participation in learning and performing such music gives students an experiential appreciation and understanding of the role of music in modern society. In addition, students from the RIT Singers have opportunities to sing in a variety of small vocal ensembles. Auditions will be held to assess proper placement. Contact instructor for more information.
  FNRT-251
   RIT Orchestra
The RIT Orchestra performs three major concerts a year of standard orchestral repertoire from the 16th century to the present. In addition, students from the RIT Orchestra have the opportunity to play in a variety of chamber music ensembles. Auditions will be held to assess proper placement. Contact instructor for more information.
  FNRT-252
   RIT Concert Band
The RIT Concert Band is an experiential-learning course in which students learn music theory and historical context by learning several works from the Concert Band literature including standard wind band literature, contemporary compositions, marches, and orchestral transcriptions. The ensemble prepares to perform three major concerts a year and participates in departmental performances. Participation in learning and performing such music gives students an experiential appreciation and understanding of the role of music in modern society. Auditions will be held to assess proper placement. Contact instructor for more information.
  FNRT-253
   World Music Ensemble
The World Music Ensemble is a hands-on course, in which students learn the fundamentals of music as a sociological phenomenon and a variety of concepts and world views to answer the question, What is music? This is accomplished by introducing students to several music cultures, through learning fundamental instrumental and dance techniques, with African music being central to the study. Ensemble is coached four-to-six-times-a-year by professional musicians and dancers, including Ghanaian Master Drummer Martin Kwaku Obeng, and performs several times each school year, both on campus and in the community. Enrollment is open to all interested students, faculty, and staff, regardless of musical proficiency. Developing cooperation and teamwork is a necessary outcome of participation in this ensemble. Auditions will be held to assess proper placement. Contact instructor for more information.
  FNRT-254
   RIT Jazz Ensemble
Preparing for and performing concerts of jazz repertoire offers students the opportunity to broaden their knowledge of and appreciation for music, and its role in society, through the careful analysis of musical forms and ideas, and the comparison of exemplary works from a variety of times, places and social/cultural necessities. The RIT Jazz Ensemble performs three major concerts a year of standard repertoire from the early 20th century to the present. Students from the RIT Jazz Ensemble also have the opportunity to play in a variety of informal performances both on and off campus. Auditions will be held to assess proper placement. Contact instructor for more information.
  FNRT-255
   RIT Chamber Orchestra
Preparing for and performing concerts of orchestral repertoire offers students the opportunity to broaden their knowledge of and appreciation for music, and its role in society, through the careful analysis of musical forms and ideas, and the comparison of exemplary works from a variety of times, places and social/cultural necessities. The RIT Chamber Orchestra is a select group of advanced players It performs concerts and engages in other activities, in particular the exploration of performing practices and stylistic considerations apropos to 17th, 18th, and 20th century music. In particular, the RIT Chamber Orchestra revives works from the 18th and early 19th centuries that have not been performed in modern times. Participation is by invitation of the music director, or by audition. Contact instructor for more information.
  FNRT-320
   Music of the Romantic Era
Survey of the rise of romanticism from Beethoven to Strauss in the context of the development of 19th century musical styles in general. Topics of exploration include national trends in 19th century music, the rise of the general public as arbiters of musical taste, philosophical influences, and performance considerations.
  FNRT-321
   Music Since 1900
Survey of the cultivated traditions of music in the 20th and 21st centuries, particularly in the U.S., taking into account its political, social, and historical frameworks.
  FNRT-322
   Survey of Jazz
This course will survey the development of American jazz music, highlighting representative composers and performers and significant works. Particular attention will be drawn to the multi-racial influences on the creation of jazz music and its relationship to American culture as a whole.
  FNRT-323
   Survey of African-American Music
This course is a survey of African American music through an examination of the major forms of music-making and dance developed among African Americans in the United States from the early 17th century to the present. A brief introduction to West African cultural characteristics, especially music and dance, as well as discussions of the African diaspora in the New World, will serve as background for this survey.
  FNRT-324
   Sounds of Protest
This course is designed to explore the variety of ways music has served as commentary on and/or symbolic representation of social circumstances and events in America and throughout the world, historically and in the present. Students will research, listen to, analyze, and discuss music representing a variety of genres, styles, and cultures, ranging from various forms of European and American folk, popular, and concert music to selected non-western music. Topics will include race, gender, sexuality, economics, class, war, and politics, among others.
  FNRT-325
   American Popular Song
This course will survey the development of the American popular song and its composers and performers, taking into account the political, social, and historical perspectives reflected in this commercial part of our vernacular music tradition.
  FNRT-326
  FNRT-327
   American Musical Theatre
This course is a survey of the development of the American Musical Theater, highlighting representative works, composers, librettists and performers of both the cultivated and vernacular traditions. It is further designed as an appreciation course, fostering the development of a greater appreciation for all types of stage music and the ability to better evaluate the quality of a work, the performance, and the performers.
  FNRT-328
   Composing for Video Games and Interactive Media
An audio professional working in the gaming industry is required to possess not only musical and audio talent, but also knowledge and experience with typical audio workflow. Composing for Video Games and Interactive Media prepares the student for a career in the industry by covering the many facets of sound production and engineering that are particular to game music and other forms of interactive media.
  EEET-361
   Modern Audio Production
Sound, voice, music, and effects play a critical role in telephone communication and entertainment systems. Development of integrated multi-channel acoustic information is a complex process. This course provides an intermediate level study of the technology used in recording, editing, mixing, and mastering audio. Students are introduced to core concepts and skills necessary to operate a system running large sessions with up to 48 tracks. Students will develop an appreciation of and the requisite skills to create, organize, mix, filter, process, enhance, and coordinate sound information in digital format. Topics include MIDI, virtual instruments, filtering, processing for sound enhancement, editing and adjusting time bases, mixing and mastering, and audio production. Students will develop critical listening skills as well as technical skills.
  FNRT-485
   Music Theory 2
This course is designed for the student who has a knowledge of basic music theory and an understanding of four-part diatonic composition. In addition to the continuing study of melodic construction and development, thematic development in two-part counterpoint, four-part harmony, chromatic materials and modulation, and analysis of form and style, emphases will be placed on the development of individual music skills.
  IGME-570
   Digital Audio Production
Technologies and techniques for producing and manipulating digital audio are explored. Topics include digital representations of sound, digital audio recording and production, MIDI, synthesis techniques, real-time performance issues, and the application of digital audio to multimedia and Web production.
  IGME-571
   Interactive Game and Audio
This course provides students with exposure to the design, creation and production of audio in interactive applications and computer games. Students will become familiar with the use of sound libraries, recording sounds in the studio and in the field, generating sound with synthesizers, and effects processing. Students will create sound designs for interactive media, integrating music, dialog, ambient sound, sound effects and interface sounds within interactive programs.

* It is strongly recommended that students select two music electives and one technology elective. At least two courses must be at the 300 level or higher.