New Media Interactive Development Bachelor of science degree

4509a506-e067-4aa1-b66d-3ed49ac9e6ce | 90515

Overview

New media are ever-changing forms of digital communication that engage, immerse, and (often) entertain users, from social networks to wearable computing and more.


The field of new media explores new and evolving technologies—the internet, social software, hand-held and wearable devices, touch and gestural interfaces, the Internet of Things, virtual reality, and more—to create useful, delightful, and engaging experiences. In the new media interactive development major, you’ll learn the programming and computing skills for multiple interfaces, as well as the design skills needed to make projects look sleek and polished for outstanding user interaction. You can focus your studies on a specific area of new media to truly explore your interests and adapt your skills to a range of emerging technologies.

New media is an ever-changing form of digital communication that engages, immerses, and often entertains users. Whereas old media involved newspapers, radio, and television, new media has adapted digital technology for the internet, social networks, wearable computing, and more. New media development professionals develop and design software for these devices. They must possess deep and far-ranging skills along with a broad understanding of the social and economic impact of all cutting-edge new media technologies. These professionals must be consummate problem-solvers with a well-honed ability to learn emerging technologies. And finally, they must also be able to make informed, timely decisions in an arena of constant urgency and change. In the new media interactive development major, students explore a multitude of creative and technical electives, including physical computing, interfaces, web, mobile, casual games, production, and more.

Plan of study

The new media interactive development major integrates strong programming skills with math, design, and communication skills essential for creative, digital media development. All students complete general education requirements in the liberal arts and social sciences. Students customize their major through both general education electives, free electives, and program electives in areas such as advanced interactive development for the web, mobile development and alternative interfaces, physical/wearable computing, game design, game development, design and media production, interactive audio, and more. Many courses are project- and team-based, which helps students to build a robust portfolio of interactive projects.

Students also work closely with students in the new media design major, housed in the College of Art and Design. Students in these majors share core courses in programming and design to learn how both disciplines collaborate. In the senior year, students from both majors work together on a capstone project, which enables them to gain valuable industry experience and portfolio development.

Cooperative education

Students are required to complete two blocks of cooperative education, which can occur during the academic year or during the summer. Co-ops are full-time, paid work experiences where students gain valuable, hands-on experience in industry—a definite edge when applying for jobs after graduation. Co-op may begin after the second year of study.

Industries


  • Internet and Software

  • Other Industries

  • Design

  • Advertising, PR, and Marketing

Typical Job Titles

Web Services Program Analyst Front-end Developer
Software Engineer Web User Interface (UI) Developer
System Developer and Integrator Digital Marketing Engineer
Web Developer Interactive Developer
User Experience (UX) Developer Front-end Applications Developer

Curriculum

New media interactive development, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
IGME-101
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving I
This course provides students with an introduction to problem solving, abstraction, and algorithmic thinking that is relevant across the field of new media. Students are introduced to object-oriented design methodologies through the creation of event-driven, media-intensive applications. Students will explore the development of software through the use of a range of algorithmic concepts related to the creation of applications by writing classes that employ the fundamental structures of computing, such as conditionals, loops, variables, data types, functions, and parameters. There is an early emphasis on object oriented concepts and design.
4
IGME-102
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving II
This course provides students a continued introduction to problem solving, abstraction, and algorithmic thinking that is relevant across the field of new media. As the second course in programming for new media students, this course continues an object-oriented approach to programming for creative practice. Topics will include re-usability, data structures, rich media types, event-driven programming, loaders, XML, object design, and inheritance. Emphasis is placed on the development of problem-solving skills as students develop moderately complex applications.
4
IGME-110
Introduction to Interactive Media
This course provides an overview of media in historical, current and future contexts. Incorporating lectures and discussion with hands on work involving written and interactive media assets, students examine the role of written and visual media from theoretical as well as practical perspectives. The course also provides an introduction to interactive media development techniques, including digital media components and delivery environments. Students will be required to write formal analysis and critique papers along with digital modes of writing including collaborative editing and effective presentation design.
3
NMDE-111
New Media Design Digital Survey I
This project-based course is an investigation of the computer as an illustrative, imaging, and graphical generation tool. It develops foundational design skills in raster and vector image creation, editing, compositing, layout and visual design for online production. Emphasis will be on the application of visual design organization methods and principles for electronic media. Students will create and edit images, graphics, layouts and typography to form effective design solutions for online delivery.
3
NMDE-112
New Media Design Digital Survey II
Through formal studies and perceptual understanding, including aesthetics, graphic form, structure, concept development, visual organization methods and interaction principles, students will design graphical solutions to communication problems for static and interactive projects. Students will focus on creating appropriate and usable design systems through the successful application of design theory and best practices. Assignments exploring aspects of graphic imagery, typography, usability and production for multiple digital devices and formats will be included.
3
MATH-131
Discrete Mathematics 
This course is an introduction to the topics of discrete mathematics, including number systems, sets and logic, relations, combinatorial methods, graph theory, regular sets, vectors, and matrices.
4
MATH-185
Mathematics of Graphical Simulation I
This is the first part of a two course sequence that aims at providing the mathematical tools needed to manipulate graphical objects and to model and simulate the physical properties of these objects. Topics from linear algebra, primarily in two and three dimensional space, analytic geometry, and calculus will be presented. The emphasis is on linear algebra, particularly its application to problems in geometry and graphical systems.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
First Year Writing 
3
Second Year
IGME-201
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving III
This is the third course in the software development sequence for new media interactive development students. Students further their exploration of problem solving and abstraction through coverage of topics such as GUI development, events, file I/O, networking, threading, and other advanced topics related to the design and development of modern dynamic applications. Programming assignments are an integral part of the course.
3
IGME-230
Website Design and Implementation 
This course provides an introduction to web development tools and technologies, such as X/HTML, CSS, Javascript and DHTML, AJAX, web platforms and environments, and server-side programming methods.
3
IGME-330
Rich Media Web Application Development I
This course provides students the opportunity to explore the design and development of Media Rich Internet Applications (MRIAs). This course moves beyond client and server side web development, and explores issues of presentation, interactivity, persistence, and extensibility common among such applications. Specifically, items explored include framework characteristics, data management, persistence, data binding, information manipulation, as well as data presentation.
3
IGME-340
Multi-platform Media Application Development
Interactive media applications are no longer restricted to personal computers. They can now be found on many distinct hardware platforms including mobile, tablet, wearable, and large-screened computing devices. In this course, students will learn to design, prototype and develop media rich interactive experiences that can be deployed to a wide variety of hardware devices. Programming projects are required.
3
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics†
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used.
3
IGME-236
Interaction, Immersion, and the Media Interface (WI)
This course examines the concepts of interface and interaction models in a media-specific context, with particular emphasis on the concept of the immersive interface. This course explores concepts such as perception, expectation, Gestalt Theory, interactivity, Semiotics, presence, and immersion in the context of media application development and deployment. In addition, underlying concepts of cognitive psychology and cognitive science will be integrated where appropriate. These theories are then integrated in the exploration of the immersive interface, and with related concepts such as user-level-interface modification, augmentation of identity, and the interface as a social catalyst.
3
IGME-099
Co-op Preparation Workshop
This course helps students prepare for co-operative education employment (“co-op”) by developing job search strategies and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of IGM fields to help focus their skill development strategies. Students are introduced to RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education, and learn about professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés and digital portfolios, and to prepare for interview situations.
0
IGME-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Cooperative education is a work experience designed to supplement the educational process. Students may select from a range of activities designated as cooperative education, including relevant industrial experience, internships, entrepreneurial activities, as well as faculty-supervised research and innovation opportunities.
Co-op
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
4
 
LAS Perspective 6‡ (scientific principles)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Third Year
IGME-202
Interactive Media Development
In this course, students will learn to create visually rich interactive experiences. It is a course in programming graphics and media, but it is also a course on the relationship between ideas and code. Students will explore topics in math and physics by building programs that simulate and visualize processes in the natural world. Assignments will include major programming projects, such as building a virtual world inhabited by digital creatures that display observable behaviors.
3
IGME-430
Rich Media Web Applications II
This course provides students the opportunity to continue the exploration of Media Rich Internet Applications (MRIAs). Topics include communications for media ecologies, distributed web application frameworks, advanced interactivity, data transformation, representation, automation, persistence, and large scale systems deployment. In addition, students are exposed to concepts and technologies related to the next generation of MRIA development.
3
IGME-470
Physical Computing and Alternative Interfaces
The rich variety and widespread adoption of gestural touch screens, motion-sensing devices, weight-reactive surfaces, wearable digital devices, and similar interface products demonstrates the demand for well-integrated devices and services that seamlessly couple people and environments. Such products can interface computers with real-world inputs and outputs, and give people new ways of controlling and experiencing their devices and information. This course provides a rapid technical introduction to basic electronics (components, circuits, microcontrollers, etc.) and emphasizes the application of interface design concepts to physically interactive and innovative product development. The course requires solo and team projects that blend electronics, programming, and design.
3
IGME-480
Current Topics in Interactive Development
Interactive media development is a rapidly evolving field. This course provides an opportunity for students to learn and experiment with emerging themes, practices, and technologies that are not addressed elsewhere in the curriculum. Topics covered in this course will vary based on current developments in the field. Students will explore, design, and develop creative interactive experiences pertaining to the semester's domain area. Programming projects are required.
3
IGME-499
Cooperative Education (summer)
Cooperative education is a work experience designed to supplement the educational process. Students may select from a range of activities designated as cooperative education, including relevant industrial experience, internships, entrepreneurial activities, as well as faculty-supervised research and innovation opportunities.
Co-op
 
Free Electives
6
 
LAS Immersion 1, 2
6
 
LAS Electives
6
Fourth Year
IGME-588
New Media Team Project
This course is designed to engage the new media major in a capstone production experience. The instructor will form interdisciplinary student teams that will design, plan, prototype, and implement new media projects. Student groups are required to test their product with users and provide written feedback and analysis.
3
NMDE-401
New Media Career Skills
The first part of the course centers on resume development, job searches, interviewing practices and online portfolio generation. The second segment focuses on the business and practices within the new media industry. This will encompass an overview of the designer/developer/client relationships, contracts, estimating, invoicing as well as rights and ethics. The third segment will focus on project workflows and management, team building and concept generation.
3
 
Advanced Program Electives
6
 
Free Electives
9
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
 
LAS Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
123

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Students have the option of taking Introduction to Statistics (STAT-145) or one of the following math courses: Calculus A (MATH-171), Project-based Calculus (MATH-181), or Calculus (MATH-181A).

‡ Students satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and the lab portions to fulfill the requirement.

Concentrations

Students select two three-course concentrations from the list below.

Accessibility
ISTE-362
Access and Assistive Technology
Students will gain hands-on experience and knowledge about a wide variety of accessibility and assistive technology available for people with disabilities. Students will understand the design principles underlying this technology and how the features and capabilities of assistive technology can be tailored to a particular individual’s needs and capabilities. Students will learn about how new technologies and research in accessibility can be made available for users, and they will learn how to design websites and software that work effectively with a user’s own technology. Specific technologies discussed in the course may include, e.g.: alternative input devices, communication devices, and screen readers and magnifiers for people with visual impairments. Programming is required.
ISTE-462
Research in Accessibility
Students will dive into cutting edge research in the field of computer accessibility and assistive technology; they will read, present, and discuss research literature from major conferences and journals in the field. Students will learn about recent developments and ongoing research efforts in accessibility, and they will learn how to synthesize the results from research publications. Students will learn how to identify high quality research and how to critique this work to identify areas for improvement or future research directions. Students will learn the elements of a high-quality research publication, and they will explore and gain expertise in a particular topic in the field of accessibility in depth.
ISTE-464
Accessibility Through the Lifespan
Students will explore how accessibility and assistive technologies intersect with aging throughout the lifespan, with a particular focus on the early and later stages of human development, including: educational contexts (for children or young adults) and effective design strategies for promoting accessibility for older adults with diverse capabilities. Students will learn key legal regulations that govern special education and accessibility in educational contexts, including the provision of assistive technologies and the accessibility of instructional technologies. Students will also explore typical changes in ability and impairments that relate to the human aging process, and they will investigate how to design usable and engaging technology for the growing population of older adults. Students will come to understand the concepts and needs of younger and older users firsthand through, e.g., guest speakers or personal interactions.
Design
NMDE-201
Elements II
Information design for static, dynamic and interactive multimedia integrates content with visual indicators. Legibility and clear communication of information and direction is important to the success of any user interface design. This course integrates imagery, type, icons, actions, color, visual hierarchy, and information architecture as a foundation to design successful interactive experiences.
NMDE-203
Interactive II
This course extends previous interactive design and development experience and skills to emphasize interactive design principles and development. The emphasis in this course will be on the creative process of planning and implementing an interactive project across multiple platforms. Students will concentrate on information architecture, interactive design, conceptual creation, digital assets, visual design and programming for interactions.
NMDE-302
Graphical User Interface
This course examines the user-centered and iterative design approaches to application and interactive development with a focus on interface design, testing and development across multiple devices. Students will research and investigate human factors, visual metaphors and prototype development to create effective and cutting edge user interfaces.
Front End Development
ISTE-340
Client Programming
This course will explore the analysis, design, development, and implementation of client-side programming in the context of Internet technologies, mobile devices, Web-based client systems and desktop applications. Students will learn to design and build usable and effective interactive systems, clients, and interfaces. Key features addressed will include browser and platform compatibility, object reusability, bandwidth and communications issues, development environments, privacy and security, and related technologies and APIs. Programming is required.
ISTE-454
Mobile Application Development I
This course extends the material covered in the Foundations of Mobile Design course and provides students with the experience of creating interesting applications for small-size form factor mobile devices such as smartphones These devices are exceptionally portable, have unique sets of hardware and communications capabilities, incorporate novel interfaces, are location aware, and provide persistent connectivity. Students are encouraged to make creative use of these unique device characteristics and operating properties to develop innovative applications. Programming projects are required.
ISTE-456
Mobile Application Development II
This course extends the Foundations of Mobile Design course in that students will learn to apply mobile design skills to develop applications in the Android platform. Students will design, develop, and test mobile applications using the Android Studio IDE. This course covers the major components such as activities, receivers, content providers, permissions, intents, fragments, data storage, and security. Programming projects are required
Instructional Technology
ISTE-392
Fundamentals of Instructional Technology
ISTE-394
Interactive Courseware
PSYC-235
Learning and Behavior
This course covers topics in learning such as non-associative learning, classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, stimulus control of behavior, reinforcement, generalization and discrimination, and observational learning. Topics on learning and behavior in non-human animals may also be covered.
Natural Language Processing
ENGL-351
Language Technology
We will explore the relationship between language and technology from the invention of writing systems to current natural language and speech technologies. Topics include script decipherment, machine translation, automatic speech recognition and generation, dialog systems, computational natural language understanding and inference, as well as language technologies that support users with language disabilities. We will also trace how science and technology are shaping language, discuss relevant artificial intelligence concepts, and examine the ethical implications of advances in language processing by computers. Students will have the opportunity to experience text analysis with relevant tools. This is an interdisciplinary course and technical background is not required.
ENGL-581
Introduction to Natural Language Processing
This course provides theoretical foundation as well as hands-on (lab-style) practice in computational approaches for processing natural language text. The course will have relevance to various disciplines in the humanities, sciences, computational, and technical fields. We will discuss problems that involve different components of the language system (such as meaning in context and linguistic structures). Students will additionally collaborate in teams on modeling and implementing natural language processing and digital text solutions. Students will program in Python and use a variety of relevant tools. Expected: Programming skills, demonstrated via course work or instruction approval.
Plus one of the following:
  ENGL-582
   Seminar in Computational Linguistics
Study of a focus area of increased complexity in computational linguistics. The focus varies each semester. Students will develop skills in computational linguistics analysis in a laboratory setting, according to professional standards. A research project plays a central role in the course. Students will engage with relevant research literature, research design and methodology, project development, and reporting in various formats.
  ENGL-584
   Spoken Language Processing
This course introduces students to speech and spoken language processing with a focus on real-world applications including automatic speech recognition, speech synthesis, and spoken dialog systems, as well as tasks such as emotion detection and speaker identification. Students will learn the fundamentals of signal processing for speech and explore the theoretical foundations of how human speech can be processed by computers. Students will then collect data and use existing toolkits to build their own speech recognition or speech synthesis system. This course provides theoretical foundation as well as hands-on laboratory practice. Prerequisite: Programming skills, demonstrated via coursework or instructor approval.
Psychology
PSYC-330
Memory and Attention
This course is intended for students in the cognitive track. This course reviews current research in the areas of memory and attention. This course will consider such memory topics as: classic theories of memory, Baddeley’s model of working memory, in-formation processing, implicit and explicit memory, principles of forgetting, developmental changes in memory, skill memory, autobiographical memory, eyewitness memory, and the neural bases of memory. Attention topics covered in this course will include: Selective and divided attention, search and vigilance, signal detection theory, and neural correlates of attention.
PSYC-331
Language and Thought
This course is intended for students in the cognitive track. This course examines the structure of human language and its relationship to thought, and surveys contemporary theory and research on the comprehension and production of spoken and written language. In addition, we will discuss categorization, representation of knowledge, expertise, consciousness, intelligence, and artificial intelligence. Topics on language and thought in non-human animals may also be covered. Part of the cognitive track for the psychology degree program.
PSYC-332
Decision Making, Judgment, and Problem Solving
This course is intended for students in the cognitive track. This course explores judgment, decision-making and problem-solving processes and focuses on the social and cognitive aspects of complex information processing. Major topics include normative, descriptive (heuristics and biases), and naturalistic approaches to decision-making, as well as selective perception, memory and hindsight biases, framing effects, social influences, group processes and human error. Models of decision-making considered include the prospect theory, expected utility theory, and Bayes’ Theorem. Problem solving will be examined from perspectives of formal, computational methods as well as intuition and creativity. Experimental methods and applications in design of systems and decision aids will receive special attention.

Advanced program electives

Course
FNRT-328
Composing for Video Games and Interactive Media
An audio professional working in the gaming industry is required to possess not only musical and audio talent, but also knowledge and experience with typical audio workflow. Composing for Video Games and Interactive Media prepares the student for a career in the industry by covering the many facets of sound production and engineering that are particular to game music and other forms of interactive media.
IGME-460
Data Visualization
Our world is flooded with data, and making sense of it can be a challenge. Visualizations help by exposing information, trends, and correlations that might otherwise go unnoticed in the raw data. In this course, students will learn to collect, clean, organize, and filter data sets of their own choosing. They will learn and apply principles from multiple fields including visual design, the psychology of perception, user experience design, and ethics. They will create static and interactive visualizations with a variety of information structures (hierarchies, maps, timelines, etc.). Students will learn to develop exploratory experiences that tell the story within the data. Programming projects are required.
IGME-529
Foundations of Interactive Narrative
This course focuses on the major elements of narrative for interactive environments. Students in this course explore the basics of narrative in the context of interactive games and media, with examination of digital storytelling in games and interactive environments of several varieties. Branching narrative, hypertext, multi- and non-linear concepts are also explored with an emphasis on balancing immersive and interactive aspects of digital narrative.
IGME-570
Digital Audio Production
Technologies and techniques for producing and manipulating digital audio are explored. Topics include digital representations of sound, digital audio recording and production, MIDI, synthesis techniques, real-time performance issues, and the application of digital audio to multimedia and Web production.
IGME-571
Interactive and Game Audio
This course provides students with exposure to the design, creation and production of audio in interactive applications and computer games. Students will become familiar with the use of sound libraries, recording sounds in the studio and in the field, generating sound with synthesizers, and effects processing. Students will create sound designs for interactive media, integrating music, dialog, ambient sound, sound effects and interface sounds within interactive programs.
IGME-581
Innovation and Invention
In this course, students explore the process and products of innovation and invention. Each semester a multi-disciplinary team of students conceives and develops a different outside the box project. Readings, projects, scholarly term papers, and pragmatic challenges of collaboration and communication across disciplines provides direct experience of the interplay of technology, human nature, and a human environment in which emerging technologies and new modes of interaction are pervasive and ubiquitous. Artists, natural scientists, social scientists, and technologists are guided through a series of collaborative experiences inventing, designing, implementing and studying emerging technologies. Presentations, projects and individually-written research papers are required. The faculty staff and resources of the Center for Student Innovation are significant assets for this course.
ISTE-456
Mobile Application Development II
This course extends the Foundations of Mobile Design course in that students will learn to apply mobile design skills to develop applications in the Android platform. Students will design, develop, and test mobile applications using the Android Studio IDE. This course covers the major components such as activities, receivers, content providers, permissions, intents, fragments, data storage, and security. Programming projects are required
NMDE-201
New Media Design Elements II
Information design for static, dynamic and interactive multimedia integrates content with visual indicators. Legibility and clear communication of information and direction is important to the success of any user interface design. This course integrates imagery, type, icons, actions, color, visual hierarchy, and information architecture as a foundation to design successful interactive experiences.
NMDE-203
New Media Design Interactive II
This course extends previous interactive design and development experience and skills to emphasize interactive design principles and development. The emphasis in this course will be on the creative process of planning and implementing an interactive project across multiple platforms. Students will concentrate on information architecture, interactive design, conceptual creation, digital assets, visual design and programming for interactions.
NMDE-302
New Media Design Graphical User Interface
This course examines the user-centered and iterative design approaches to application and interactive development with a focus on interface design, testing and development across multiple devices. Students will research and investigate human factors, visual metaphors and prototype development to create effective and cutting edge user interfaces.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 4 years of math including pre-calculus required
  • Requires chemistry or physics and strongly recommends both.
  • Computing electives are recommended

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in computer science, calculus, liberal arts; calculus-based physics, chemistry, or biology

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in computer science, engineering science, or liberal arts

Learn about admissions and financial aid