Evan Selinger Headshot

Evan Selinger

Professor
Department of Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2531
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
06-A315

Evan Selinger

Professor
Department of Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Binghamton University; MA, University of Memphis; Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook

Bio

Evan Selinger, Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the Rochester Institute of Technology, received his Ph.D. in Philosophy at Stony Brook University in 2003. His research covers a range of issues in the philosophies of technology and expertise. Professor Selinger's most recent book is Re-Engineering Humanity (Cambridge, 2018). For information on his publications, teaching, speaking engagements, and sponsored research see:

Professor Selinger’s Home Page

Currently Teaching

PHIL-101
3 Credits
Philosophy is about the rigorous discussion of big questions, and sometimes small precise questions, that do not have obvious answers. This class is an introduction to philosophical thinking where we learn how to think and talk critically about some of these challenging questions. Such as: Is there a single truth or is truth relative to different people and perspectives? Do we have free will and, if so, how? Do we ever really know anything? What gives life meaning? Is morality objective or subjective, discovered or created? We’ll use historical and contemporary sources to clarify questions like these, to understand the stakes, to discuss possible responses, and to arrive at a more coherent, more philosophically informed, set of answers.
PHIL-416
3 Credits
Examines some area of philosophy at an advanced undergraduate level. The area examined may vary from semester to semester. The seminar is designed especially for those whose interest in philosophy goes beyond the requirements of the liberal arts curriculum.
PHIL-307
3 Credits
Technology is a ubiquitous and defining force in our world. This course investigates how our conceptions of technology have emerged within philosophy, as well as the role technology plays in shaping how we live and how we reflect upon questions of meaning and value in life. Technological modes of understanding, organizing and transforming the world shape our relationships with others, with ourselves and with nature at fundamental levels. We will explore how these modes have emerged and why they emerged so predominantly within a Western social and intellectual context.
PHIL-304
3 Credits
An introduction to philosophical analysis centering on the nature, extent and justification of law, the nature of legal thought, and the problems and theories of justice and the relationship between law, ethics and morality.
PHIL-305
3 Credits
An introduction to some of the philosophical dimensions of the search for world peace, including the elements that would constitute a just and lasting peace, nations as moral entities, justice and national self-interest, force and violence, the morality of the use of force, peace-making and peace-keeping groups.

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