Grant Cos Headshot

Grant Cos

Professor
School of Communication
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-6646
Office Location

Grant Cos

Professor
School of Communication
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, University of Massachusetts at Amherst; MA, Emerson College; Ph.D., Kent State University

Bio

Professor Cos teaches a variety of different courses in the School of Communication. His research interests center on the Aristotelian trilogy of politics, ethics and rhetoric. Specifically, these interests have manifested themselves into the study of mediated speechmaking and political campaigning, 'mash-up' online advertisements and politics, and contemporary instances of dissent during wartime.

Positions held

Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2017-
Associate Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2007-2017
Assistant Professor of Communication, Rochester Institute of Technology - 1999-2005
Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, 1996-1999

Courses offered

  • Human Communication
  • Public Speaking
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Persuasion
  • Survey of Media Technologies
  • Qualitative Research Methodology
  • Political Communication
  • Communication Law & Ethics
  • Media Law & Ethics
585-475-6646

Currently Teaching

COMM-890
0 Credits
A guided research study culminating in an original, systematic, and scholarly study of a significant communication problem. Focuses on designing, conducting, and completing an independent research project. The progress of each project is publicly defended.
COMM-800
1 - 6 Credits
A guided research project that focuses on designing, conducting, and completing a research project. The project culminates in a public presentation and defense.
COMM-700
3 Credits
This course focuses on significant media innovations from historical, societal, political, and cultural perspectives. Innovations such as print, radio, film, television, and digital technologies will be discussed. Milestone research and theory will drive the examination of each perspective on the media. The course concludes with the development of research questions for studying contemporary lines or research investigating media.
COMM-342
3 Credits
This course examines major principles and trends in communication law. The course analyzes a broad range of issues related to the First Amendment, intellectual property, and media regulation. Special attention is paid to discussing the major ethical perspectives and issues surrounding contemporary communication behavior.
COMM-704
3 Credits
This course examines major principles and trends in communication law. The course analyzes a broad range of issues related to the First Amendment, intellectual property, and media regulation. Special attention is paid to discussing the major ethical perspectives and issues surrounding contemporary communication behavior.
COMM-720
0 Credits
An introduction to graduate study and research in communication including the theoretical, conceptual, and methodological parameters of communication and its sub-disciplines. Participants will interact with the faculty teaching required and elective communication courses. Attention will be drawn to scholarly writing and research design. When possible, the course is organized in conjunction with the department’s colloquium series.
COMM-305
3 Credits
An in-depth study of the theories, practices, effects, and ethics of persuasion. Persuasion is defined as human communication designed to influence one’s beliefs, values, attitudes, and actions. This course examines persuasion from a receiver-oriented perspective with interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mediated perspectives.

Select Scholarship

Published Article
Jenkins, Keith B., and Grant Cos. “A Time for Change and a Candidate’s Voice: Pragmatism and the Rhetoric of Inclusion in Barack Obama’s 2008 Presidential Campaign.” American Behavioral Scientist, 54.3 (2010): 184-202. Print.