Jesus Aguilar Headshot

Jesus Aguilar

Professor
Department of Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-7683
Office Location

Jesus Aguilar

Professor
Department of Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts

Bio

Jesús Aguilar received his Ph.D. from McGill University in 2003. He is interested in a broad spectrum of issues in the philosophy of action, philosophy of mind, Latin-American Philosophy, and metaphilosophy. Among these issues are the nature of agency, the problem of causal deviance, the control of basic actions, multiple realization, mental causation, the nature of thought experiments, and the role of imagination in philosophical thinking. His recent publications have explored some of these topics.

585-475-7683

Currently Teaching

PHIL-411
3 Credits
Metaphysics is the study of the general features of existence or reality. This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of being as developed in several major philosophers from the Greeks to the present. Discussion will focus on such topics as God, time, space, substance, essence, existence, process, causality, possibility, necessity, chance, and value.
PHIL-202
3 Credits
This course is a survey of foundational, and normative, approaches to moral philosophy and their motivating moral questions. Topics will include virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism, and other approaches. Some of the questions to be examined are: How is human nature related to morality? What are the grounds for moral obligations? Is there an ultimate moral principle? How do we reason about what to do? Can reason determine how we ought to live? What are moral judgments? Are there universal goods? What constitutes a morally worthwhile life? Can morality itself be challenged?
PHIL-404
3 Credits
The Philosophy of Mind includes issues of metaphysics, epistemology, logic, psychology, aesthetics, linguistics, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and biology, to name a few. Issues to be investigated include: Is there an ontological difference between minds and bodies? Could there be minds without bodies? Can I know that I have a mind? Are there other minds in the universe? Can I be conscious of my own consciousness? Can other things have the kinds of experiences which I have?
PHIL-103
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to improve everyday reasoning skills. Critical thinking means evaluating the reasons for our actions and beliefs. Ideally, we think our actions are rational, not arbitrary. But one does not have to look far to discover disagreement and apparent irrationality. What accounts for this? This course investigates how to argue effectively, how to evaluate evidence and reasons, and how to marshal good evidence and reasons in order to arrive at reliable knowledge and justified action. It covers common mistakes that people make in causal, statistical, moral, and everyday reasoning, and it teaches how and when it pays to be skeptical, reflective, and critical.

Select Scholarship

Book Chapter
Aguilar, Jesus. "Metaphilosophical Internalism and the Possibility of a Distinctive Latin American Philosophy." Reframing the Practice of Philosophy: Bodies of Color, Bodies of Knowledge. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 2012. 103-120. Print.
Journal Paper
Aguilar, Jesus. "Basic Causal Deviance, Action Repertoires, and Reliability." Nous-Philosophical Issues 22. (2012): 1-19. Print.
Aguilar, Jesus. "Basic Casual Deviance, Action Repertoires, and Reliability." Nous - Philosophical Issues 22. (2012): 1-19. Print.
Editor (book or journal)
Aguilar, Jesus and Andrei Buckareff, eds. Causing Human Actions: New Perspectives on the Causal Theory of Action. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2010. Print.
Published Article
Aguilar, Jesus. “Agential Systems, Causal Deviance, and Reliability.” Causing Human Actions: New Perspectives on the Causal Theory of Action, 2010. Print. *
Aguilar, Jesus.“Literature and Latin American Philosophy.” The Blackwell Companion to Latin American Philosophy, 2010: 383-396. Print. “