Vinay Abhyankar Headshot

Vinay Abhyankar

Assistant Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-4665
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
160 Lomb Memorial Dr Rochester, NY 14623

Vinay Abhyankar

Assistant Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Binghamton University

Bio

Dr. Vinay Abhyankar received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Binghamton University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. After one year in technical consulting, he joined the Biotechnology and Bioengineering Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. Prior to joining RIT, he led the Biological Microsystems Division at the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute.

Dr. Abhyankar’s research laboratory works at the intersection of engineering, biomaterials science, and biology. Current work focuses on developing accessible microfluidic systems that integrate controlled microenvironments with topographically defined matrices to engineer biomimetic tissue interfaces.These technology platforms are well-suited for both undergraduate and graduate research involvement and combine simulation-based design, hands-on prototyping, and experimental studies to better understand human disease.

Currently Teaching

MTSE-790
1 - 9 Credits
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
BIME-411
3 Credits
The second in a two course sequence involving the description and analysis of physiological mechanisms from a systems point of view. The focus of this course will be on the interaction between organ systems for the purpose of homeostasis. In particular, attention will be paid to feedback mechanisms that involve electrical and chemical feedback and control systems. Fluid and gas transport mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular and respiratory systems including their regulatory behavior and the function of the kidney are introduced by way of their contribution to fluid volume and pressures as well as its fundamental material exchange properties. Engineering analysis methods will be applied to an open-ended problem associated with pathological performance of some aspect of these systems and will be used to proposing a suitable compensatory mechanism to address or eliminate it. The interaction between the nervous, muscular, digestive, endocrine, immune, cardiovascular, renal and respiratory systems and how they affect growth and metabolism, movement, fluid and electrolyte balance, material exchange and disease processes will be discussed. Open-ended problems and weaknesses in these mechanisms will be discussed and addressed in a quantitative and analytical manner based on engineering analysis including simple statistics associated with population based variations. (Writing Intensive Course)
BIME-670
3 Credits
This course is intended to provide an overview of how replacement organs and tissues can be engineered using both natural and synthetic biomaterials that direct cellular differentiation and integration. The objectives of the course are to present how tissues can be engineered using the physical and chemical properties of biomaterials and targeted differentiation of multi- and pluripotent stem cells. Topics include the adhesion, migration, growth and differentiation of cells as well as the optimization and modeling of molecular and cellular transport within and across engineered tissues. Additionally, the course will investigate the engineering parameters and necessary functionality of artificial tissues. There is no laboratory component to this course. Graduate students will work in pairs to present one of the engineering fundamentals lectures listed in section 6.3 as it applies to tissue engineering. Additionally, graduate students will also be responsible for independently researching and presenting a case study on the use of stem cells in tissue engineering at the conclusion of the course.
BIME-570
3 Credits
This course is intended to provide an overview of how replacement organs and tissues can be engineered using both natural and synthetic biomaterials that direct cellular differentiation and integration. The objectives of the course are to present how tissues can be engineered using the physical and chemical properties of biomaterials and targeted differentiation of multi- and pluripotent stem cells. Topics include the adhesion, migration, growth and differentiation of cells as well as the optimization and modeling of molecular and cellular transport within and across engineered tissues. Additionally, the course will investigate the engineering parameters and necessary functionality of artificial tissues.
BIME-491
1 Credits
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-410 (Systems Physiology I) and BIME-440 (Biomedical Signals and Analysis). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to investigate pressure, volume and flow relationships of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems including the inherent variability and dynamic response to perturbations. Signal processing methods will be utilized to address ubiquitous artifacts found in measured physiological signals.
BIME-499
0 Credits
One semester of paid work experience in biomedical engineering.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Phaneuf, CR, et al. "Ultrasensitive Multi-species Detection of CRISPR-Cas9 by a Portable Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform." Analytical Methods 11. (2018): 559-565. Print.
Tran, N, et al. "MicroRNA Dysregulational Synergistic Network: Discovering MicroRNA Dysregulatory Modules Across Subtypes in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers." BMC Bioinformatics 19. (2018): 504. Print.
Hasan, Mohammad R., et al. "One-Step Fabrication of Flexible Nanotextured PDMS as a Substrate for Selective Cell Capture." Biomedical Physics & Engineering Express. (2017): 1-11. Web.
Peer Reviewed/Juried Poster Presentation
Williams, M, et al. "Rapidly Integrated Microfluidic Debubbler." Proceedings of the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting October 2018. Atlanta, GA. Ed. BMES. Atlanta, GA: n.p..
Ahmed, A, et al. "An Automated Process for the 
Fabrication of Aligned Collagen Substrates with Tunable Fiber Properties." Proceedings of the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting October 2018. Atlanta, GA. Ed. BMES. Atlanta, GA: n.p..
Inyang, Edidiong, Vinay V. Abhyankar, and Michael Cho. "Validation of an in vitro TBI Model for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption." Proceedings of the Biomedial Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Ed. BMES. Phoenix, AZ: BMES.
Almendariz, Cristian, Mohammad R. Hasan, and Vinay V. Abhyankar. "A 3D Printed, Low Cost, High Capacity Bubble Trap for Microfluidic Applications." Proceedings of the Biomedial Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Ed. BMES. Phoenix, AZ: BMES.
Hasan, Mohammad R., et al. "Flexible Nanotextured PDMS As A Substrate for Selective Cell Capture." Proceedings of the Biomedial Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Ed. BMES. Phoenix, AZ: BMES.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Inyang, E, et al. "In Vitro Characterization of Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Post Microcavitation." Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting October 2018 Atlanta, GA. BMES. Atlanta, GA. 20 Oct. 2018. Conference Presentation.
Published Conference Proceedings
Tran, Nhat, et al. "MicroRNA Dysregulational Synergistic Network: Learning Context-Specific MicroRNA Dysregulations in Lung Cancer Subtypes." Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine (BIBM). Ed. IEEE. Kansas City, MO: IEEE, 2017. Web.