Imaging Science Society honors professor

Susan Farnand to serve as IS&T Vice President of Publications

Susan Farnand

Rochester Institute of Technology professor Susan Farnand has been named to a leadership position in the Society for Imaging Science and Technology, also known as IS&T.

Farnand, a professor in the RIT Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science and in the program of Color Science, will serve a two-year term as the IS&T Vice President of Publications, effective July 1.

“It’s an exciting, albeit somewhat challenging, time with new opportunities for the dissemination of information,” said Farnand. “I am looking forward to working with the Journal of Imaging Science & Technology editor and IS&T staff on the society’s publications program, as we strive to make the library, website and other vehicles valuable resources for those working in the broad field of imaging science and technology.”

Farnand, an active society member since 2007, is an associate editor of the Journal of Imaging Science & Technology and a past co-editor of a special issue of the Journal of Electronic Imaging on image quality. She has also chaired the honors and awards committee and participated in previous sessions of the International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, or NIP, and Image Quality and Systems Performance conferences.

She was among the first cohort to earn her Ph.D. in color science from RIT in 2013. Farnand’s research interests include human color perception and color vision. She also uses eye-tracking technology to study what attracts people’s attention.

Farnand is a resident of Fairport, N.Y.

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