Ceramics Minor

Overview

The ceramics minor enables you to develop craftsmanship and skills in both traditional throwing, hand building, and sculptural work in clay while also engaging in aesthetic and creative problem solving associated with the material and processes. You will investigate an individual design language and personal aesthetic through the creation of various processes and techniques in ceramics.

Notes about this minor:

  • This minor is closed to students majoring in the studio arts BFA who have chosen the ceramics option.
  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
  • Notations may appear in the curriculum chart below outlining pre-requisites, co-requisites, and other curriculum requirements (see footnotes).

The plan code for Ceramics Minor is CCER-MN.

Curriculum for Ceramics Minor

Course
Required Course
Choose one of the following:
   CCER-124
   Clay Studio Survey
This elective course will introduce students to ceramics as an artform. Subjects will include basic hand-building techniques, a variety of finishing processes, surface development, and historical and contemporary perspectives. Through assigned projects, students will demonstrate their enhanced understanding of ceramics. **Fee: a course fee applied via student account. ** (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with 1st or 2nd year standing.) Studio 5 (Fall Or Spring).
   CCER-128
   Josiah's Wedgwood's Legacy
This course will examine the evolution of 18th-century European ceramics under the influence of Josiah Wedgwood’s innovative spirit. Considered widely to be the father of modern marketing and manufacturing, potter, social activist, and politician Josiah Wedgwood built an empire from utilitarian objects underpinned by complex relationships between ceramics, technology, and culture. Through a combination of research-based exploration and hands-on, immersive learning, students will develop an understanding of the impact ceramics manufacturing had on such phenomena as social dynamics, social class, business practices, technologies that spurred advanced manufacturing, division of labor, and Neoclassical style. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand the significance of clay within history, the impact of pottery on culture in the age of imperialism, and how Wedgwood’s innovations endure today in the contemporary practices of studio pottery, ceramic manufacturing, and art. **This course requires a lab fee.** (This course is available to undergraduate students.) Studio 5 (Fall Or Spring).
Electives
Choose four of the following:
   CCER-206
   Ceramic Sculptural Processes
This introductory course is designed to give the student an understanding of a variety of basic processes involved in creating hand-built ceramic objects, sculpture, and pottery vessels. There will be an emphasis on manipulating clay using forming techniques such as pinch, coil, solid, and slab building. Students will learn surface finishing processes such as textures and surface carving and decorating with slips, glaze applications, and gain a perspective on material science. The historical, cultural, and technical concerns of ceramics will be explored. These experiences will broaden the students' perspectives of ceramic art and its relationship to the larger world of art. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CCER-211
   Thrown Vessel Forms
This course will introduce the student to beginning wheel forming techniques used in the ideation and creation of utilitarian vessels. There will be a focus on form, function and surface development. Students will engage in a variety finishing processes for surface development as well as slip and glaze application. Students will gain an understanding of a variety of firing techniques, as well as an introduction to material science to better understand the properties clay and glaze composition. The historical, cultural, and technical concerns of ceramics will be explored. These experiences will broaden the students' perspectives of ceramic art and its relationship to the larger world of art. Students will be expected to research areas of interest within ceramic history **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CCER-511
   Ceramic Processes
   CCER-513
   Thrown Sculptural Forms
   CCER-530
   Ceramics 3 Credit Elective
This is a class specifically designed for non-majors covering the fundamental techniques and aesthetics of working with clay. Topics covered include the forming techniques, clay mixing, basic properties of clay, glazing and firing techniques and fundamental understanding of historical and contemporary practices and applications. The course includes prescribed projects based on the number of studio hours. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Studio 5 (Fall, Spring).