Community Development and Inclusive Leadership Bachelor of science degree

63f33317-9519-4697-882f-c9e8af54a091 | 6230803

Overview

The NTID bachelor of science degree in community development and inclusive leadership is an innovative, interdisciplinary program in which students gain skills in leadership, interpersonal communication, research, and data management–all of which are needed by dynamic leaders at the helm of 21st century organizations. This is a multidisciplinary degree offered in partnership with Saunders College of Business, the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Health Sciences and Technology, and the School of Individualized Study.

A comprehensive curriculum ensures that students in the program will be able to:

  • Identify and analyze traits, skills, communication styles, and best practices of domestic, international, historical, and modern-day community leaders.
  • Examine their personal leadership strengths and weaknesses.
  • Learn and apply qualitative and quantitative research methods to help identify and address community needs, develop and implement strategies, and assess outcomes.
  • Recognize and value multicultural, accessible, and inclusive community members and groups.
  • Determine strategies for dialoguing, identifying, and addressing social justice issues, concerning ability, race, gender, class, religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity within different communities.
  • Identify and utilize best leadership practices in individual, group, and social media communication skills to advance community inclusion, consensus, and productivity.
  • Integrate grant writing and grant management skills into development of community strategic planning.
  • Apply core theoretical foundations of inclusive leadership and community development to a variety of government, education, business, and not-for-profit agencies.

Students are well prepared for leadership opportunities and will be adept at meeting the demands of the rapidly changing needs of workplaces and community organizations. The program will also prepare students for advanced study in graduate degree programs in a range of areas.

Concentrations

Students choose one of six concentrations in the following areas: deaf leadership, business management, public policy, community health, political science, or psychology.

Careers

Students will be prepared to assume entrepreneurial, managerial, and advocacy leadership roles in government, public, private, and educational organizations. Students will graduate with a leadership e-portfolio that demonstrates qualitative and quantitative research acumen, grant writing and leadership experience, multicultural competency, and social media management skills as well as a strong foundation in leadership theory and best practices in community development. These transferable and sought-after skills will ensure graduates will have success in the workforce or in an advanced graduate program.

Industries


  • Non-Profit

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

  • Health Care

  • Advertising, PR, and Marketing

  • International Affairs

  • Politics

  • Writing and Editing

  • Higher Education

Typical Job Titles

Community Support and Engagement Specialist Executive Director
Economic Development Planner Housing and Community Development Administrator
Social Media Director Chief Executive Officer
Editor Project Assistant Employer Readiness Transition Coach
Assistant to the Director Human Resources Specialist
Community Development Manager Director of Community Development
Assistant Director of Community Relations and Development

Curriculum for Community Development and Inclusive Leadership BS

Community Development and Inclusive Leadership, BS degree, typical course sequence

This proposed curriculum outline is provided to give students an idea of the course work and topic areas this new program will cover. This course work is subject to change.

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
LEAD-101
General Education - Social Perspective: Introduction to Community Leadership and Development
3
LEAD-102
Inclusive Leadership
Being a successful community leader requires the ability to understand and respond effectively to organizational context. This course provides a comprehensive understanding of organizations with emphasis on various approaches to organizational development. Specific focus will be placed on the workplace structure in educational, government, non-profit, and entrepreneurial environments. Finally, students will learn about methods that organizations use for accessibility and learn about organizational racial justice and disability justice. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
LEAD-103
Introduction to Intersectionality
This course will define intersectionality and review the reality of the intersection of race, class, gender and sexual identity. Students will explore how systems of oppression reinforce each other and visually see how varying identities intersect to create an overall matrix of domination. Essential to this course is understanding that there is no construction of race separate from gender, no construction of class separate from race, no construction of sexual identity separate from gender and that identity is not static but contingent, contextual, and simultaneous effect of multiple identities. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed LEAD-102 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
   NMTH-250
   General Education - Mathematical Perspective A: Elementary Statistics
An introductory statistics course utilizing a lecture/lab format in which statistics concepts, probability, probability distributions, and bivariate data are studied. Statistical concepts that are essential for an understanding of social and political issues of contemporary life will be emphasized. Statistical software and applications will be introduced. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students that have completed (UWRT-100 or 150 or 0502-111) and NMTH-210 or higher with a grade of C- or better or have a math placement score greater than or equal to 40 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
 
   STAT-145
   General Education - Mathematical Perspective A: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
UWRT-150
General Education - First Year Writing: FYW: Writing Seminar
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing. Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education - Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education - Scientific Principles Perspective
3
 
General Education - Elective
9
Second Year
LEAD-200
General Education - Ethical Perspective: Dimensions for Ethical Community Leadership
This course provides an introduction to ethical theories, frameworks, and practices as they relate to community development and inclusive leadership. Topics in this course will include communication, advising, mentoring, trust- and rapport-building, problem-solving, cultural awareness, diversity, and ethical codes of practice, and will be approached through the use of theoretical frameworks, such as strengths-based evaluation, social constructiveness, and systems perspectives. With a focus on ethical decision-making, students will engage in self-analysis and reflection to develop a deeper self-awareness in these areas. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
LEAD-201
Shaping Educational and Legal Policy
This course will provide an introduction of legal and educational policies that impact the Deaf community. The course will focus on the national and state legislative and policy making structures and processes, the Americans with Disabilities Act and related laws policy. Against the broad background of current legal policy, the course will also focus on the various styles of leadership within a range of educational settings including but not limited to: early identification and intervention, K – 12, post-secondary, and adult. This course will involve learning about educational laws and policies, including the analysis and development of mock policies. In addition, students will gain a broad understanding of how advocacy, lobbying, and political movements can lead to successful and positive results regarding the education of Deaf and hard of hearing students. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
LEAD-203
Foundation of Dialogue: Black Deaf Experiences
A leader’s ability to facilitate understanding, inclusion, and resolution is key to leading a group to success. Honoring and valuing Black and Black Deaf people’s experiences are critical to creating an inclusive, empowering and effective work group. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students may apply knowledge gained through dialogue and readings to lead agencies and organizations to inclusive change. Students will also explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences through readings, journals, leading a dialogue and a final written paper. (Prerequisite: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed LEAD-200 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
LEAD Concentration Course
3
 
General Education - Global Perspective
3
 
General Education - Natural Science Inquiry Perspective
3
 
General Education - Mathematical Perspective B
3
 
General Education - Elective
3
 
General Education - Immersion 1, 2
6
Third Year
LEAD-350
Introduction to Qualitative Research
3
LEAD-351
Introduction to Quantitative Research
3
LEAD-500
Experiential Learning in Community Development and Inclusive Leadership
0
NAST-220
Fundamentals of Database Applications
This course introduces the fundamental concepts of a database management system for creating, maintaining, manipulating, retrieving, and printing business data. Students will learn to create various forms and design reports for storing and displaying data. In addition, the student will create switchboard systems and allow users to view data in multiple dimensions. Students will also learn to save database objects in HTML format so they can be viewed by a browser and imported or exported in XML format. (NTID Supported Students.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
LEAD Concentration Course 2, 3, 4, 5
12
 
General Education - Elective
3
 
Open Electives
6
Fourth Year
LEAD-501
Capstone Seminar (WI)
3
 
LEAD Concentration Course 6, 7, 8, 9
12
 
General Education - Immersion
3
 
General Education - Electives
6
 
Open Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

The proposed curriculum outline provides an overview of the course work/topic areas in this new program and is subject to change.

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Concentrations
Deaf Leadership
FNRT-355
Fundraising, Grant Writing, & Marketing for Nonprofit Institutions
This course examines the growing autonomy of collecting institutions as they are cut off from various forms of governmental sponsorship and public subsidy and their subsequent needs for raising money from outside, non-traditional sources. The course looks at issues of needs assessment, budgeting, and strategic planning. It focuses on the design and implementation of effective fundraising campaigns, as well as on the organization and writing of successful grant proposals. It also considers the importance of marketing to overall institutional success. Lecture (Fall).
LEAD-300
Rhetoric of Leadership
Students master the elements of rhetoric and become adept at strategies for successfully conveying valuable knowledge and a leadership vision that persuades readers and motivates organizations. Beyond the Aristotelian rules of communication, students learn powerful and innovative techniques drawn from multiple sources, including media and visual narratives. Each student produces written projects and oral presentations, and each student receives critical feedback and individual support as well as workshop team input and top visitor expertise. Through exploration of rhetorical perspectives and practices of leadership, students will be able to understand, analyze, and evaluate rhetoric’s potential relationships to experiences and practices of contemporary leadership. Furthermore, students will demonstrate ability to engage in rhetorical leadership by adopting at least one communication strategy to connect with their intended audiences. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-301
Social Media Communication and Leadership
This course focuses on social media technologies and communication used by leaders and organizations in the United States and globally. Students will examine various social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and LinkedIn, and evaluate the security, privacy, ethics, and accessibility possibilities for each. Through experiential learning, students will build their own social media brands, content, and hashtags, using current trends, theories, and tools, including tools of accessibility and inclusion, to welcome a diverse network of followers. An analysis of how social media technologies have impacted organizational development, political activism, social justice, the economy, and news consumption, will inform students about social media advantages and disadvantages, as well as etiquette, best practices, and do’s and don’ts. This course will provide students with the opportunity to experience how people with various disabilities access social media to guide management on best practices in accessibility, and review case studies of diversity and inclusion in social media to engage with followers/audiences from various cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall Or Spring).
LEAD-302
Community Development in Athletics
LEAD-303
Literatures of Intersectionality
Leaders of social justice movements work towards visions of a better world—one that dismantles systemic barriers and injustices. This course will turn to intersectional fiction writing to examine how literature can contribute to social justice movements. In other words, we will ask how reading literatures of intersectionality may foster social justice movements. In doing so, we will situate contemporary intersectional literature in their historical contexts—looking to the theory and writing of feminist women-of-color, queer studies, disability studies, Indigenous studies, and Deaf studies. We will read some of these theories as literature and literature as theory—with attention to interlocking forms of oppression and privilege. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-304
Conflict Resolution: Negotiation and Mediation
This skills-oriented course introduces theories and practices of conflict resolution and provides basic training in mediation, negotiation, and facilitation. In addition to examining the strengths and weaknesses for each of these conflict resolution methods, this course orients students to specific tools commonly used in each to manage conflicts, such as identifying the zone of possible agreement (ZOPA), developing BATNAs (best alternative to a negotiated agreement), and performing SWOT Analyses (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats). Through the use of case studies, simulations, role-plays, and reflective practice, students will learn how to manage power imbalances and ethical dilemmas, address needs for accommodations, and adapt for cultural differences. Students will learn a range of transferable skills for managing interpersonal, organizational, and community disputes. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-305
International Deaf Leadership and Community Development
The challenges and opportunities for Deaf community development vary from one country to another. This course focuses on the skills and best practices for Deaf leaders to implement in their countries of origin. Students will be introduced to international laws that support Deaf and underserved communities. The achievements of past and current international Deaf leaders will be studied and used as a model for identifying the needs of communities and mobilizing community action. This course is designed for international and domestic students who are committed to making positive organizational changes in countries throughout the world. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-306
Leadership in the Deaf Community
This course will introduce historical and current issues regarding leadership and the Deaf/Hard of Hearing (D/HH) community. Students will learn about D/HH leaders in the Deaf community over the years, examine movements that have impacted the lives of D/HH individuals, and finally, learn about influential organizations of, by, and for D/HH individuals. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-307
Leadership & Accessible Tech
This course equips students with tools for understanding principles and uses of accessible technologies, such as captioned media, mobile applications, and voice recognition software, with a focus on how deaf and hard-of-hearing leaders and organizations work to ensure access to communication. This course is built on the framework of access as a continual process in which users advocate for the needs of their community. This course establishes the legal requirements that mandate access technologies, such as captioned media, and reviews how leaders have campaigned for increased access to media. These underlying principles inform the course’s overriding exploration of the benefits and limitations of current technologies that may not be fully accessible; how current leaders and leading organizations utilize access technologies to facilitate signed, spoken, and written communication; and current work on the next generation of access technologies. The readings, assignments, and discussions in this course will encourage students to recognize how access technologies can support individuals as well as how leaders can serve as advocates who work to fight for improved access to communication and other resources in their communities. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-308
Current Trends in Community Development and Leadership
This course includes an overview of the current trends in community development and leadership. Content includes best practices and topics for community development and leadership, as well as pertinent laws, policies, resources and information. Students will participate in and critique a designated set of lectures, roundtable discussions and presentations on topics covering current trends in community development and inclusive leadership. The goal is to engage students in discussion of current trends with their peers and with experts in the field. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-309
Dialogue: Race and Ethnicity
This course will include an overview of the history of current race & ethnic relations in the United States, including the Deaf community. It will provide students with advanced skills in planning, evaluating and leading group discussions needed to create and empower working groups in the community, education or on the job, to achieve their organizational goals. Students will be challenged to apply these skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by people of color and diverse ethnicities to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse working groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives. Students will explore avenues for resolution. Students will use readings, journals, discussions, and a final written paper to explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall Or Spring).
LEAD-310
Dialogue: Gender
An overview of the history of gender and its evolution in American society will be provided. Students will be challenged to apply dialogue skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by different genders to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse working groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students will also explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences through readings, journals, leading a discussion and a final reflection paper. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-311
Dialogue: Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, Hard-of-Hearing
A history of the Deaf, Deafblind, DeafDisabled and Hard-of-Hearing communities and their relationship with the American society will be discussed. This course will challenge students to apply group skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by deaf, deafblind, deafdisabled, or hard-of-hearing communities to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse work groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students will also use readings, journals, discussions, and a final reflection paper to explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall Or Spring).
LEAD-312
Dialogue: LGBTQIA
An evolution of the LGBTQIA movement and intersectionality will be covered. This course will challenge students to apply group skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by LGBTQIA communities to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse work groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students will also use readings, journals, leading a discussion and a final reflection paper to explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-313
Dialogue: Social Class
An overview of class and privilege in American society will be provided in this course. In a socially diverse organization, an effective leader must develop the talent of harnessing the skills and contributions of each of its members to achieve its goals. Classism and privilege have precluded many people from access to or full participation in many educational, professional, and community-based organizations. Developing skills to discuss issues of classism and privilege is critical to any work group’s effectiveness. A leader’s ability to facilitate understanding and resolution is key to leading the group to success. Working to establish a just work group as well as empowering and valuing diverse abilities and experiences are critical to creating inclusive and effective work groups. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

 

Business Management Concentration
ACCT-110
Financial Accounting
An introduction to the way in which corporations report their financial performance to interested stakeholders such as investors and creditors. Coverage of the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
NACC-205
Financial Accounting
Introduction to accounting principles for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both service and merchandising (retail/wholesale) businesses are introduced. Areas covered include: analyzing and recording of business transactions using the double-entry accounting system; adjusting and closing entries and financial statement preparation. Generally accepted accounting principles, accounting ethics and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
ACCT-210
Management Accounting
Introduction to the use of accounting information by managers within a business. Explores the value of accounting information for the planning and controlling of operations, assessing the cost of a product/service, evaluating the performance of managers, and strategic decision making. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
NACC-206
Managerial Accounting
Introduction to the use of cost accounting information by managers within a business. This course includes development of manufacturing statements, cost theory, integration of materials, labor and overhead, job order and process costing, flexible budgeting and evaluating the performance of managers and divisions through variance analysis. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students who have completed NACC-205 or equivalent.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
DECS-310
Operations Management
A survey of operations and supply chain management that relates to both service- and goods- producing organizations. Topics include operations and supply chain strategies; ethical behavior; forecasting; product and service design, including innovation and sustainability; capacity and inventory management; lean operations; managing projects; quality assurance; global supply chains; and the impacts of technology. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
MGMT-215
Organizational Behavior
As an introductory course in managing and leading organizations, this course provides an overview of human behavior in organizations at the individual, group, and organizational level with an emphasis on enhancing organizational effectiveness. Topics include: individual differences, work teams, motivation, communication, leadership, conflict resolution, organizational culture, and organizational change. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
MGMT-310
Leading High-Performance Teams
Taught in an experiential, team-based format, this class focuses on leading teams and developing strong team dynamics, especially within a high tech. environment. The course will provide hands-on experience in leading and participating in teams as students will be assigned to multiple teams with a specific role on each team, including team leader. When possible, the class includes a virtual team project with students at RIT’s global campuses. (Prerequisites: MGMT-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MGMT-320
Organizational Effectiveness Skills
This course provides students with working knowledge and practice of the professional and interpersonal skills of effective organizational members. Skills include networking, presenting, professional writing, giving and receiving feedback, handling conflict, and leveraging diversity. Particular emphasis is placed upon applying these skills in a virtual work environment. (Prerequisites: MGMT-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MGIS-130
Information Systems & Technology
To be successful in our globally-networked business environment, contemporary management professionals must have a strong grounding in the principles of information and information technology. This course provides an introduction to the field of management information systems (MIS), including the tools and techniques for managing information and information technologies within organizations. We place a particular emphasis on the nature of systems, the role of information in business processes, the management of data, and the planning of MIS design projects. Lecture 3, Recitation 3 (Fall, Spring).
MGIS-330
Systems Analysis and Design
Successful organizations utilize a systematic approach to solve real-world business problems through the use of computing resources. Students who complete this course will be able to design and model business processes. They will learn how to conduct requirements analysis, approach the design or redesign of business processes, model system functions, effectively communicate systems designs to various levels of management, work in a project-based environment, and approach the implementation of a new organizational information system. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MGIS-320
Database Management Systems
Transforming data into information is critical for making business decisions. This course introduces students to the concepts of data, information and the business database management systems (DBMS) used by modern organizations. Exercises and hands-on projects are used to model the information needs of an organization and implement and query databases using applications such as Microsoft Access and SQL. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MGIS-350
Developing Business Applications
Development of business applications is transforming from programming to integration of software components using application development environments. Students learn the fundamentals of computer programming and applications development through a set of programming exercises that focus on visual development environments and component integration. These exercises expand into a project where students apply concepts of typical development and project methodologies to complete a comprehensive programming assignment. Lecture 3 (Spring).
MGIS-450
Enterprise Systems
This course explores the role of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems in organizations. Students analyze cross-functional business processes and ERP systems commonly used to support these processes. Students engage in a hands-on project using a current ERP system, such as SAP R/3, to demonstrate, analyze and design system structures, key data elements and process configurations that support cross-functional business processes, including accounting, sales, material management, production and distribution. Lecture 3 (Fall).
MKTG-230
Principles of Marketing
An introduction to the field of marketing, stressing its role in the organization and society. Emphasis is on determining customer needs and wants and how the marketer can satisfy those needs through the controllable marketing variables of product, price, promotion and distribution. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3, Recitation 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
NBUS-227
Principles of Marketing
This course introduces the field of marketing and its focus on how consumer purchasing behavior impacts the marketplace (domestically and internationally). Emphasis will be placed on understanding the customers' needs and wants, marketing mix and its impact on the external market environment. Students will demonstrate the marketing concepts, principles and strategies through the development of a marketing plan. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MKTG-320
Global Marketing
Internet marketing is critical to an organization's overall strategy. This course focuses on tactics and strategies that enable marketers to fully leverage the internet. Topics include the overall internet marketing landscape, technologies, customer segmenting and targeting, search, analytics and emerging internet-marketing platforms. (Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MKTG-350
Consumer Behavior
A study of the determinants of buying behaviors. Emphasis is on identifying target markets and customer needs, internal and external influences on lifestyle and understanding the buying decision process. (Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MKTG-360
Professional Selling
Selling concepts, tools, strategies, and tactics are discussed as they apply to both external and internal customers. Students learn and experience some of problems faced and rewards earned by those in professional sales. Customer relationship management/partnering with customers and truly seeking to meet their requirements are discussed as key to long-term success. (Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course and 3rd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MKTG-370
Advertising and Promotion Management
An in-depth view of tools of promotion management: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, direct marketing and internet marketing as well as new and alternative media. Basic concepts of how to use print, broadcast, internet and out-of-home media are studied. Planning, budgeting, creative strategy, and the roles of advertising agencies are also covered. (Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MKTG-410
Search Engine Marketing and Analytics
An examination of search engine marketing strategies to maximize site traffic, lower customer acquisition costs and boost conversion rates. Marketing frameworks provide the basis for the hands-on examination of search engine marketing and web analytics. (Prerequisites: MKTG-320 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

 

Public Policy Concentration
FNRT-355
Fundraising, Grant Writing & Marketing for Nonprofit Institutions
This course examines the growing autonomy of collecting institutions as they are cut off from various forms of governmental sponsorship and public subsidy and their subsequent needs for raising money from outside, non-traditional sources. The course looks at issues of needs assessment, budgeting, and strategic planning. It focuses on the design and implementation of effective fundraising campaigns, as well as on the organization and writing of successful grant proposals. It also considers the importance of marketing to overall institutional success. Lecture (Fall).
PUBL-201
Ethics, Values & Public Policy
This course focuses on the connections and interplay between personal and social values, ethics, and public policy. It explores how values and norms influence public policies and how the resulting expressions of values through public policies impact the implementation and effectiveness of policy choices. It also delves into how different countries make widely different policy choices based on their citizens’ values and social norms. The course also considers how new developments in science and technology influence the interplay between values, ethics, and policy across multiple issues. In addition, this course explores how to formulate values-based explanations of certain public policy preferences. Topics range across the policy issue spectrum. Lecture (Fall).
PUBL-301
Public Policy Analysis
This course provides students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative methods, such as cost-benefit analysis, sampling designs, and decision trees. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
PUBL-363
Cyber Security Policy and Law
Why are we still so bad at protecting computer systems? Is it because we don’t have good enough technology? Or because we lack sufficient economic incentives to implement that technology? Or because we implement technologies but then fail to use them correctly? Or because the laws governing computer security are so outdated? Or because our legal frameworks are ill-equipped to deal with an international threat landscape? All these reasons—and others— have been offered to explain why we seem to see more and more large-scale cybersecurity incidents and show no signs of getting better at preventing them. This course will examine the non-technical dimensions of this problem—the laws and other policy measures that govern computer security threats and incidents. We will focus primarily on U.S. policy but will also discuss relevant policies in the E.U. and China, as well as international tensions and norms. The central themes of the course will be the ways in which technical challenges in security can be influenced by the social, political, economic, and legal landscapes, and what it means to protect against cybersecurity threats not just by writing better code but also by writing better policies and laws. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
PUBL-510
Technological Innovation and Public Policy
Technological innovation, the incremental and revolutionary improvements in technology, has been a major driver in economic, social, military, and political change. This course will introduce generic models of innovation that span multiple sectors including: energy, environment, health, and bio- and information-technologies. The course also analyzes how governments choose policies, such as patents, to spur and shape innovation and its impacts on the economy and society. Students will be introduced to a global perspective on innovation policy including economic competitiveness, technology transfer and appropriate technology. Lecture (Spring).
PUBL-520
Information & Communications Policy
This course examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence innovation in, and regulation of, information, computer, and telecommunications technologies. In particular the course will examine such topics as privacy, freedom of speech, cyber security, copyrights and intellectual property rights, access to information technology, and the regulation of the Internet. Lecture (Fall).
PUBL-530
Energy Policy
This course provides an overview of energy resources, technologies, and policies designed to ensure clean, stable supplies of energy for the future. The course evaluates the impacts of fossil fuel, renewable energy, and hydrogen technologies on society and how public policies can be used to influence their development. The development of U.S. energy policy is of particular concern, although a global perspective will be integrated throughout the course. Lecture (Spring).
PUBL-531
Climate Change: Science, Technology and Policy
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 3rd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
PUBL-589
Topics in Public Policy
Allows examination of a special problem or topical area in the field of public policy. Topics and specific content and methods vary from year to year or term to term. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STSO-201
Science and Technology Policy
Examines how local, state, federal and international policies are developed to influence innovation, the transfer of technology and industrial productivity in the United States and other selected nations. Lecture (Fall, Spring).
STSO-341
Biomedical Issues: Science and Technology
A study of the impact of science and technology on life, our view of life and of the value issues that arise from this impact. Lecture (Biannual).
STSO-421
Environmental Policy
This course introduces students to federal, state, and local environmental policies and the various policy paths leading to their establishment. Students will understand how societal values inform the content of environmental policies and the impacts, in turn, of these policies on society. In addition, the class will explore how environmental economics informs the new tools of environmental policy. The course covers a range of environmental policies at the U.S. and international levels addressing problems such as air and water pollution, climate change, energy use, and community sustainability. Lecture (Spring).

 

Community Health Concentration
ANTH-435
The Archaeology of Death
Death and burial are how most individuals enter the archaeological record and one could say that deliberate burial of the dead is the first direct evidence we have for the emergence of ethical and religious systems of thought. Human remains, their mortuary treatment, and associated material culture illuminate past patterns of social organization, economics, belief systems, health, and the negotiation of gender, status, and identity. In this course we explore the scientific and theoretical tools used to analyze and interpret past mortuary practices, how archaeologists create new knowledge about the past through the formulations and testing of hypotheses, survey mortuary practices from their first occurrence in the archaeological record, and what human remains can tell us about changes in the human experience over time and space. We will learn how human remains are identified, how determinations of age, sex, biological affiliation, health, and injury are made, how to interpret formation processes, to interpret associated material culture to understand the negotiation of gender and status; how humans have cared for the deceased members of their societies at different times and places in the human past; and the ethics of studying human mortuary remains. Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall Or Spring).
COMM-344
Health Communication
An introduction to the subject of communication in health care delivery and in public health campaigns, with an emphasis on interpersonal, organizational, and mass communication approaches. Also covered is the interrelationship of health behavior and communication. Lecture (Spring).
CRIM-245
Prostitution and Vice
This course will examine prostitution and vice in the United States and globally. Through empirical scholarship, various issues will be examined including issues faced by sex workers including crime, victimization, health and safety, and law and policy issues. Quality of life issues for communities will also be examined. (Prerequisites: CRIM-110 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
HLTH-315
Reinventing Health Care
This course discusses reinventing health care in our country. Specifically the course will review the current status of American health care including research into population demographics and health, and the concept of wellness and prevention. We will review the role of health care reform in reinventing health care. Following this we review international health care models as we consider best practice as alternative care models for consideration for the US. Third the students will develop, for their area of interest and expertise, a strategy for incremental or radical innovation in how we provide health care to our constituents. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
HLTH-320
Legal Aspects of Health Care
This course provides an overview of statues and regulations as they apply to the health care system. Topics include: an overview of the American legal system; licensure of institutions; licensure and discipline of practitioners; physician-patient relationship; reproductive issues; the right to die; organ donations; medical records; legal liability; malpractice; and labor law. Lecture 3 (Spring).
HLTH-325
Health Care Leadership
Highly trained clinical and administrative professionals drive the nature of work in health care. The purpose of this course is to provide students the opportunity to study leadership theory as it is applied in health care organizations. Leadership theories and applications geared toward professionals working in health service organizations will be emphasized. Students will learn to apply leadership theories via case studies and issue analysis of their active work environments. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
HLTH-330
Health Planning And Program Development
This course provides a review of the methodology of planning effectively for health care services. The use of data systems and the methods of forecasting, identifying, and analyzing problems are explored. The course will all address the process of strategic planning, setting priorities, developing projects and allocating resources. Students prepare actual application for new programs to regulatory agencies. Lecture 3 (Spring).
FNRT-355
Fundraising, Grant Writing & Marketing for Nonprofit Institutions
This course examines the growing autonomy of collecting institutions as they are cut off from various forms of governmental sponsorship and public subsidy and their subsequent needs for raising money from outside, non-traditional sources. The course looks at issues of needs assessment, budgeting, and strategic planning. It focuses on the design and implementation of effective fundraising campaigns, as well as on the organization and writing of successful grant proposals. It also considers the importance of marketing to overall institutional success. Lecture (Fall).
PSYC-221
Abnormal Psychology
This course will serve as an introduction to the study of psychopathology and mental illness. The course examines the major categories of mental disorder not only from the descriptive point of view, but also in terms of the major theoretical explanations of the causes of disorder. The major treatment modalities also are covered. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture (Fall, Spring).
PSYC-221H
Honors Abnormal Psychology
PSYC-231
Death and Dying
This course examines the role of loss including death in our lives and the way we give and receive support during difficult times. It also looks at how society enfranchises some grievers and disenfranchises others. Included in this course is an examination of our options as consumers of funeral and burial services, grief counseling and other products and services which can either minimize or abate our grief. Central to the course is an examination of the ethical principles which apply to abortion, euthanasia and suicide and an examination of the ways in which the choices we make may be structured to express our core values. Finally, the course explores how The American way of Death differs from that of other societies and how we might incorporate the wisdom of other cultures into our own practices. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
PSYC-241
Health Psychology
A majority of serious diseases today are caused by or exacerbated by behavior and many are preventable. This course provides an introduction to the role of behavior in health. Students will learn about the role of psychology in studying and promoting good health behaviors. Topics include the impact of stress and coping on health, psychological variables related to chronic disease, drug addiction, promoting healthy behavior (e.g. exercise, diet, sleep, sexual health), positive psychology, pain management, critical thinking about health product and alternative medicine claims, and research approaches in health psychology. Students who might elect to take this course include students majoring in related fields who wish to learn more about health behavior (e.g. healthcare technology), students majoring, minoring, or immersing in Psychology, and students looking for a Liberal Arts Elective. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
SOCI-102
Foundations of Sociology
Sociology is the study of the social world and socialization processes. Sociologists study the broader picture of how societies are structured and organized through a macro-sociological analysis as well as how individuals create their own social reality symbolically through their interactions with others in a micro-sociological analysis. Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of each approach and come away with a sociological framework which they can critically apply to their own lives. Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOCI-246
Gender and Health
This course examines connections between gender and health that are both conceptual and empirical. Students will explore the causes of gender-based differences in health outcomes through case studies of sexual and reproductive rights, HIV/AIDS epidemics and violence. Students will also examine global gender and health trends. The course concludes with an examination of gender inequity in health care and policy implications of these inequities. Lecture 3 (Annual).
ANTH-246
Gender and Health
This course examines connections between gender and health that are both conceptual and empirical. Students will explore the causes of gender-based differences in health outcomes through case studies of sexual and reproductive rights, HIV/AIDS epidemics and violence. Students will also examine global gender and health trends. The course concludes with an examination of gender inequity in health care and policy implications of these inequities. Lecture 3 (Annual).
SOCI-322
Health and Society
What would a healthy society look like? What questions should we be asking of those in power to ensure health equity? What is health equity? The objective of this course is to develop a sociological language for answering these and other questions. To do so, students will evaluate the relationship between health and society – that is, the connections between contemporary health disparities and today’s social, physical, and political economic environments. This includes an analysis of macro-factors (climate change, environmental pollution, global and/or national economies, laws) and micro-factors (social media, neighborhood conditions, green spaces, poor- or low-quality housing, and leisure spaces). The course emphasizes that health is impacted by the social circumstances into which people are born; inequitable distributions of power; and social/legal categories of exclusion and inclusion. Though sociological in orientation, this course resonates with the disciplinary and professional aims of medical anthropologists, public health professionals, community health practitioners, and anyone committed to eradicating health disparities. Lecture 3 (Annual).
STSO-341
Biomedical Issues: Science and Technology
A study of the impact of science and technology on life, our view of life and of the value issues that arise from this impact. Lecture (Biannual).

 

Political Science Concentration
FNRT-355
Fundraising, Grant Writing & Marketing for Nonprofit Institutions
This course examines the growing autonomy of collecting institutions as they are cut off from various forms of governmental sponsorship and public subsidy and their subsequent needs for raising money from outside, non-traditional sources. The course looks at issues of needs assessment, budgeting, and strategic planning. It focuses on the design and implementation of effective fundraising campaigns, as well as on the organization and writing of successful grant proposals. It also considers the importance of marketing to overall institutional success. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-110
American Politics
This course examines the basic principles, themes and institutions of American politics. The course will approach the study of American politics from four interrelated topics: 1) American political values and constitutional foundations; 2) mass politics and political socialization; 3) political institutions; and 4) public policy. Current events will be discussed throughout the course in an effort to promote responsible citizenship. In addition to providing a basic overview of American politics, this course seeks to develop critical thinking, group dynamic and communication skills that are transferrable outside the classroom. Lecture (Fall, Spring).
POLS-120
Introduction to International Relations
The purpose of this course is to provide a basic knowledge of the field of international relations. Among the topics to be addressed are key theoretical concepts, themes and controversies in the field such as: important state and non-state actors in international politics, security, economic relations between states, levels of analysis, and schools of thought. Lecture (Fall, Spring).
POLS-215
Tech, Ethics & Global Politics
This course examines the mutual influence of science, technology and global politics within the framework of international ethics. Contemporary debates around drones, climate change, cyber security, the Ebola pandemic, hydraulic fracturing, renewable energy, nanotechnology, biotechnology, and nuclear power reveal the field of International Relations must take scientific and technological developments more seriously. In order to comprehend the mutual influence of science, technology, and global politics, the course will examine the political project of the early moderns, who sought the removal of traditional, moral restraints on scientific and technological innovations, as well as the international efforts to regulate scientific and technological innovation beginning in the twentieth century and continuing to the present day. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
POLS-250
State & Local Politics
This course is a study of politics and government on the state and local levels, as well as the relationships between these levels and the federal government. The first focus of the course is on the federal system of government, including the interdependence of the three levels of government. The course continues by examining the state level followed by a focus on local government. A final topic is policy-making, including revenues and expenditures, which again illustrate the interrelationship of the three levels. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-290
Politics and the Life Sciences
This course examines the intersection between politics and the life sciences. The course will examine the biological approach to human behavior, paying special attention to the implications of biological explanations of behavior for political systems. Topics to be covered may include the biological approach to morality, law, and international conflict, as well as the political and policy implications of new research in the biological sciences including biotechnology. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-295
Cyberpolitics
Innovations in digital communication technologies have the potential to affect many aspects of politics and government. Beyond specific elements such as elections and delivery of government services, these developments have the potential to expand and redefine the nature of political participation and civic engagement, and to alter the structure of political power. This course examines the potential and promise of digital democracy, and attempts to separate hype from reality. Lecture (Spring).
POLS-305
Political Parties and Voting
Political parties are a crucial part of the democratic process, as are elections. Parties and elections serve as a critical link between citizens and their government, as parties and candidates promote policies favored by voters. This course studies parties, their history, their future and their role in the democratic process. Overall emphasis is on the degree to which parties perform or fail to perform as a link between citizens and government. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-310
The Congress
This course examines the role of the Congress in American government. Topics studied include elections, party organization, committees, interest-group activities and executive-legislative relations. Lecture (Spring).
POLS-320
American Foreign Policy
A study of the formulation and execution of American foreign policy, including the examination of the instruments, procedures, and philosophies shaping the development of foreign policy. Lecture (Fall Or Spring).
POLS-325
International Law and Organizations
The study of international law and organizations is the study of international cooperation and governance. The course will cover a variety of theoretical and substantive topics including the theories of international law and organizations, the historical development of international organizations, how these organizations work in practice, and whether they are effective. Emphasis will be placed on the United Nations and the role and usefulness of nongovernmental organizations in international organization. Several of the substantive issues discussed are interstate violence and attempts to address humanitarian concerns, globalizations, and the environment. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-330
Human Rights in Global Perspective
This course explores the theoretical meaning, both domestically and internationally, and the institutional and political aspects of human rights. Issues covered include the definition of human rights; the relationship between civil and political rights and economic, social and cultural rights; the meaning and impact of humanitarian and international human rights law; the impact of cultural relativism in the definition and assessment of the promotion and protection of human rights; the significance of different religious perspectives; the question of the legitimacy of humanitarian interventions and the effects of globalization on human rights perceptions and practices. Lecture (Fall, Spring).
POLS-333
The Rhetoric of Terrorism
This class examines the history of terrorism (both the concept and the term), definitions of terrorism and attempts to explain the root causes of terrorism through rhetorical and ethical analysis of narratives written by historians, journalists, and terrorists themselves. Students will read and discuss charters, manifestoes and messages (terrorism texts) of domestic and foreign, regional and global, non-state entities motivated by politics or religion to commit violence, as well as the efforts of analysts to explain and contextualize their activities. Lecture 3 (Fall).
POLS-355
Political Leadership
The fundamental proposition of this course is that political leadership makes a crucial difference in the life of a nation. The course will examine how leadership may serve as either a constructive or destructive force in the pursuit of some shared, national goal or purpose. The course will consider a diverse range of leaders and their respective styles and types of leadership. Each leader will be studied in terms of his or her historical context, the means and ends each employed in the pursuit of political goals, and the particular qualities both virtues and vices each embodied as a political leader. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-365
Anarchy, Technology & Utopia
This course examines the way in which new technologies challenge and provide alternatives to traditional political structures and functions. The course discusses the moral status of the state through the lens of anarchic political thought, with an emphasis on the concept of consent. Themes of anarchic thought are then discussed in light of how new technologies decentralize power and challenge traditional state goals, such as regulation or state secrecy. Technologies to be discussed include social media platforms and nongovernmental, digital currency, as well as decentralized energy sources like solar and wind. The ethical and moral implications of these new technologies, the harms and benefits they present, and their use as challenges to the moral status of the state are all central themes. Lecture 3 (Biannual).

 

Psychology Concentration
Required Courses
Choose one of the following:
   PSYC-101
   Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology. Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   PSYC-101H
   Honors Introduction to Psychology
Choose one of the following:
   PSYC-221
   Abnormal Psychology
This course will serve as an introduction to the study of psychopathology and mental illness. The course examines the major categories of mental disorder not only from the descriptive point of view, but also in terms of the major theoretical explanations of the causes of disorder. The major treatment modalities also are covered. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture (Fall, Spring).
   PSYC-221H
   Honors Abnormal Psychology
PSYC-223
Cognitive Psychology
This course examines how people perceive, learn, represent, remember and use information. Contemporary theory and research are surveyed in such areas as attention, pattern and object recognition, memory, knowledge representation, language acquisition and use, reasoning, decision making, problem solving, creativity, and intelligence. Applications in artificial intelligence and human/technology interaction may also be considered. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
PSYC-226
Developmental Psychology
This course explores the process of human development, from conception through adolescence and continuing through later adulthood. The developmental approach integrates across many areas of psychology, including perception, cognition, social and emotional development, personality, morality, human factors, and neuroscience. Topics will include such things as infant brain plasticity, the development of identity in adolescence, and memory changes in adulthood. In addition, experimental methods of developmental research will be introduced and practiced, including issues specific to studying children and adults. (Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.) Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
Electives
FNRT-355
Fundraising, Grant Writing & Marketing for Nonprofit Institutions
This course examines the growing autonomy of collecting institutions as they are cut off from various forms of governmental sponsorship and public subsidy and their subsequent needs for raising money from outside, non-traditional sources. The course looks at issues of needs assessment, budgeting, and strategic planning. It focuses on the design and implementation of effective fundraising campaigns, as well as on the organization and writing of successful grant proposals. It also considers the importance of marketing to overall institutional success. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-250
State & Local Politics
This course is a study of politics and government on the state and local levels, as well as the relationships between these levels and the federal government. The first focus of the course is on the federal system of government, including the interdependence of the three levels of government. The course continues by examining the state level followed by a focus on local government. A final topic is policy-making, including revenues and expenditures, which again illustrate the interrelationship of the three levels. Lecture (Fall).
POLS-310
The Congress
This course examines the role of the Congress in American government. Topics studied include elections, party organization, committees, interest-group activities and executive-legislative relations. Lecture (Spring).
POLS-355
Political Leadership
The fundamental proposition of this course is that political leadership makes a crucial difference in the life of a nation. The course will examine how leadership may serve as either a constructive or destructive force in the pursuit of some shared, national goal or purpose. The course will consider a diverse range of leaders and their respective styles and types of leadership. Each leader will be studied in terms of his or her historical context, the means and ends each employed in the pursuit of political goals, and the particular qualities both virtues and vices each embodied as a political leader. Lecture (Fall).
PUBL-201
Ethics, Values & Public Policy
This course focuses on the connections and interplay between personal and social values, ethics, and public policy. It explores how values and norms influence public policies and how the resulting expressions of values through public policies impact the implementation and effectiveness of policy choices. It also delves into how different countries make widely different policy choices based on their citizens’ values and social norms. The course also considers how new developments in science and technology influence the interplay between values, ethics, and policy across multiple issues. In addition, this course explores how to formulate values-based explanations of certain public policy preferences. Topics range across the policy issue spectrum. Lecture (Fall).
PUBL-520
Information & Communication Policy
This course examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence innovation in, and regulation of, information, computer, and telecommunications technologies. In particular the course will examine such topics as privacy, freedom of speech, cyber security, copyrights and intellectual property rights, access to information technology, and the regulation of the Internet. Lecture (Fall).

Admission Requirements

For information on admission requirements, please contact NTID Admissions.

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