Diversity, Inclusion, and Dialogue Immersion

Overview

Students in the diversity, inclusion, and dialogue immersion will study the social construct of diverse communities through examination of experiences of inequity, discrimination, oppression, and intersectionality. They will learn constructive dialogue techniques for use across a range of communities, with the goal of understanding diverse populations and their experiences.

Notes about this immersion:

The plan code for Diversity, Inclusion, and Dialogue Immersion is LEADID-IM.

Curriculum for Diversity, Inclusion, and Dialogue Immersion

Course
Required Courses
LEAD-203
Foundation of Dialogue: Black Deaf Experiences
A leader’s ability to facilitate understanding, inclusion, and resolution is key to leading a group to success. Honoring and valuing Black and Black Deaf people’s experiences are critical to creating an inclusive, empowering and effective work group. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students may apply knowledge gained through dialogue and readings to lead agencies and organizations to inclusive change. Students will also explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences through readings, journals, leading a dialogue and a final written paper. (Prerequisite: LEAD-200 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-303
Literatures of Intersectionality
Leaders of social justice movements work towards visions of a better world—one that dismantles systemic barriers and injustices. This course will turn to intersectional fiction writing to examine how literature can contribute to social justice movements. In other words, we will ask how reading literatures of intersectionality may foster social justice movements. In doing so, we will situate contemporary intersectional literature in their historical contexts—looking to the theory and writing of feminist women-of-color, queer studies, disability studies, Indigenous studies, and Deaf studies. We will read some of these theories as literature and literature as theory—with attention to interlocking forms of oppression and privilege. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
Electives
Choose one of the following:
   LEAD-304
   Conflict Resolution: Negotiation and Mediation
This skills-oriented course introduces theories and practices of conflict resolution and provides basic training in mediation, negotiation, and facilitation. In addition to examining the strengths and weaknesses for each of these conflict resolution methods, this course orients students to specific tools commonly used in each to manage conflicts, such as identifying the zone of possible agreement (ZOPA), developing BATNAs (best alternative to a negotiated agreement), and performing SWOT Analyses (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats). Through the use of case studies, simulations, role-plays, and reflective practice, students will learn how to manage power imbalances and ethical dilemmas, address needs for accommodations, and adapt for cultural differences. Students will learn a range of transferable skills for managing interpersonal, organizational, and community disputes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   LEAD-309
   Dialogue: Race and Ethnicity
This course will include an overview of the history of current race & ethnic relations in the United States, including the Deaf community. It will provide students with advanced skills in planning, evaluating and leading group discussions needed to create and empower working groups in the community, education or on the job, to achieve their organizational goals. Students will be challenged to apply these skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by people of color and diverse ethnicities to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse working groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives. Students will explore avenues for resolution. Students will use readings, journals, discussions, and a final written paper to explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences. (Prerequisites: LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall Or Spring).
   LEAD-310
   Dialogue: Gender
An overview of the history of gender and its evolution in American society will be provided. Students will be challenged to apply dialogue skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by different genders to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse working groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students will also explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences through readings, journals, leading a discussion and a final reflection paper. (Prerequisites: LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   LEAD-311
   Dialogue: Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, Hard-of-Hearing
A history of the Deaf, Deafblind, DeafDisabled and Hard-of-Hearing communities and their relationship with the American society will be discussed. This course will challenge students to apply group skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by deaf, deafblind, deafdisabled, or hard-of-hearing communities to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse work groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students will also use readings, journals, discussions, and a final reflection paper to explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences. (Prerequisites: LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall Or Spring).
   LEAD-312
   Dialogue: LGBTQIA
An evolution of the LGBTQIA movement and intersectionality will be covered. This course will challenge students to apply group skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by LGBTQIA communities to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse work groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students will also use readings, journals, leading a discussion and a final reflection paper to explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences. (Prerequisites: LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   LEAD-313
   Dialogue: Social Class
An overview of class and privilege in American society will be provided in this course. In a socially diverse organization, an effective leader must develop the talent of harnessing the skills and contributions of each of its members to achieve its goals. Classism and privilege have precluded many people from access to or full participation in many educational, professional, and community-based organizations. Developing skills to discuss issues of classism and privilege is critical to any work group’s effectiveness. A leader’s ability to facilitate understanding and resolution is key to leading the group to success. Working to establish a just work group as well as empowering and valuing diverse abilities and experiences are critical to creating inclusive and effective work groups. (Prerequisites: LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).