ASL-English Interpretation associate of applied science degree

d8fb55d6-4e22-40f5-8f17-243c7ffacb1b | 128667

Overview

On-the-job responsibilities

The ASL-English interpretation major prepares entry-level sign language interpreters for work in settings where deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing people interact and communicate. The degree allows students to develop foundation skills.

Places of employment

Graduates find entry work in a variety of settings, including elementary, secondary, and post-secondary educational institutions; community service organizations; vocational rehabilitation agencies; business and industry; and government agencies.

Admission requirements

In addition to RIT’s general admissions procedures, the ASL-English interpretation major requires applicants to complete admission materials from the NTID Admissions Office.

Academic preparation

Entry to the associate degree program is available for students who demonstrate proficiency at the ASL III (INTP-126) level and are ready to enter ASL IV (INTP-225) (see course descriptions). It is strongly recommended that applicants possess a BS degree. (Note: Candidates for national interpreter certification must possess a baccalaureate degree.) For those applicants who have had college experience, college transcripts should document a GPA of 3.0 or better, with evidence of very good performance in English courses. A writing sample will be judged on vocabulary, grammar, structure, style, and creativity.

To succeed in this major, students must be able to understand a speaker who is behind them; understand a speaker who is far away; focus on what a speaker is saying in a noisy room; and understand recorded voices through headphones. To see a list of the major skills and abilities needed to study sign language interpreting, please visit the section “Is Interpreting the Career for Me?” on our website.

Industries


  • K-12 Education

  • Non-Profit

  • Other Education

  • Higher Education

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

  • Health Care

Curriculum

ASL-English interpretation, AAS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INTP-210
Introduction to the Field of Interpreting
This survey course is the introduction to the profession of sign language interpreting, with a focus on the role, function, and responsibilities of an interpreter. Information about the history of the profession, professional organizations, and settings where interpreters work is presented. Additional topics include the function of assessing as part of the interpreting process, with a focus on Demand/Control Schema. To progress to INTP-220 students must complete course with a minimum grade of C.
3
INTP-225
American Sign Language IV
This course builds upon information taught in ASL I-III. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various intermediate-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Students analyze multiple meaning English words and English idioms to express concepts in ASL. Issues related to Deaf culture continue to be introduced based on unit topics. To progress to the next courses in the series (INTP-215, INTP-220 and INTP-226), students must complete the course with a minimum grade of C.
3
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
INTP-215
Processing Skills Development
This course is an introduction to the mental processing skills (pre-interpreting skills) of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. This course includes an overview of the theoretical models of interpretation, provides skill development activities for isolated interpreting sub-tasks and practice activities for the integration of these tasks in translation and consecutive interpreting activities. Course content includes interpreting theory, message analysis, text analysis, visualization, listening and comprehension, shadowing, paraphrasing, dual task training, text analysis. To progress to (INTP-310) students must complete the course with a grade of C or better.
3
INTP-220
Discourse Analysis
This course presents an introductory look at the interpreter as a bicultural/bilingual mediator, at the center of communicative activity. The interpreter's success requires the analysis of how communication (spoken, written, signed) is structured so that it is socially appropriate and linguistically accurate. This course includes an introduction to significant linguistic features and the analysis of conversational exchanges in English and ASL, focusing on the practical application of analyzing discourse.
3
INTP-226
American Sign Language V
This course builds upon information taught in ASL VI. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various intermediate-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Students continue to analyze multiple meaning English words and English idioms to express concepts in ASL. Issues related to Deaf culture continue to be introduced based on unit topics. To progress to the next courses in the series (INTP-325 and INTP-310), students must complete the course with a minimum grade of C).
3
 
First Year Writing Seminar
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
INTP-310
Interpreting I
This course introduces the English to ASL and ASL to English interpreting process with a focus on text analysis and consecutive production of an equivalent message in the target language. Compression and expansion strategies are introduced. Students develop interpreting management strategies and diagnostic assessment skills. Students will interpret inquiry and narrative texts in monologue and dialogue formats. Warm-up exercises will be performed as part of the self-care regimen recommended for sign language interpreters. To progress to INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English, students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C.
3
INTP-315
Practical and Ethical Applications
This course presents the underlying principles of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Code of Professional Conduct and applies the Code to the various situations and settings. Students will explore how professional interpreters apply these principles in their daily work and how consumers perceive the ethical role and function of interpreters. In addition, etiquette and protocol for each setting will be discussed. Settings include: K-12, post-secondary, religious, healthcare, mental health, deaf-blind, performing arts, and business and industry. To progress to INTP-350 Practicum and Seminar I, students must complete course with a minimum grade of C.
3
INTP-325
American Sign Language VI
This course builds upon information taught in ASL I-V. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various advanced-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Students analyze different components in storytelling. ASL Literature will be introduced in this level. Students identify controversial issues in various works of ASL Literature. To progress to the next courses in the series (INTP-326, INTP-335 and INTP-336) students must complete courses with minimum grades of C.
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
INTP-326
American Sign Language VII
This course builds upon information taught in ASL I-VI. This is the last series of ASL courses. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various advanced-level discourse features in debate and public speaking in ASL. Students analyze different components in debate and public speaking. Students identify and discuss various controversial issues via debate and presentation. To progress to next courses in the sequence (INTP-435 and INTP-436) students must complete course with a minimum grade of C.
3
INTP-335
Interpreting II: English to ASL
Students develop the ability to produce an equivalent simultaneous ASL message from a spoken English source message. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific discipline areas include healthcare, employment and finance. Students will continue to develop text analysis skills applying them to simultaneous interpreting. Biomechanics and self-care issues will be discussed. To progress to the next courses in the sequence (INTP-350 and INTP-435) students must complete courses with a minimum grade of C.
3
INTP-336
Interpreting II: ASL to English
Students will develop the ability to produce an equivalent English message from ASL source messages. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific content areas include healthcare, employment and finances. Students continue to develop text analysis skills, applying them to simultaneous interpreting. To progress to the next courses in the sequence (INTP-350 and INTP-436 ) students must complete courses with minimum grades of C.
3
INTP-350
Practicum and Seminar I
The student experiences a practicum placement under the immediate supervision of a professional interpreter, who functions as the student's mentor, and the seminar instructor who functions as the students' supervising instructor. The practicum will involve such activities as: observing the mentor and a variety of other interpreters at work; preparing videotapes for mentor critique; interpreting under the supervision of the mentor; and meeting weekly with the mentor to discuss the practicum experience. Additionally, practicum students will meet together, weekly, to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Class discussions focus on language issues in interpretation, application of the Code of Professional Conduct, situational concerns and protocols, and problem solving related to D-C Schema. Course requires a minimum of 135 hours of field experiences. Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C. (For students completing the AAS degree permission of the instructor, cumulative GPA 2.5 and in good standing; INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications with a minimum grade of C. Co-requisite: INTP-335 Interpreting II and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English) (For students completing the BS degree permission of the instructor, cumulative GPA 2.5 and in good standing; INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications, INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English with minimum grades of C)
3
 
LAS Elective: Mathematics
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
60

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.