Civil Engineering Technology Bachelor of science degree

b1d60505-9961-4309-903f-5d85c3942d68 | 129043

Overview

Gain the practical theory, knowledge, and skills necessary to solve the complex challenges posed by society’s growing infrastructure needs. Through lab work and design projects, civil engineering technology students acquire skills in a wide range of sub-disciplines and put theory and technology to work to solve engineering challenges.        


Solving problems and providing solutions to society’s growing infrastructure needs are what civil engineering technology graduates do best. You’ll learn to design bridges and buildings, analyze traffic flow, manage the construction of complex structures, and address environmental issues such as clean drinking water, and more. The civil engineering technology degree provides the practical theory and skills you’ll need to analyze and design systems; plan and prepare design and construction documents; utilize software to produce drawings, reports, and quantity estimates; select appropriate engineering materials, and develop cost estimates.

In the first two years of the program, technical subjects are taught concurrently with mathematics and science, helping you to understand applications while studying scientific fundamentals. In labs, you’ll use experimental methods to solve engineering challenges and put theory and technology to work. Elective courses enable students to choose from a wide range of course options to further enhance their program of study and prepare them to achieve their career goals. RIT’s program allows you to specialize while obtaining a broad background. Students can specialize in one of three discipline-specific areas – structural design, construction management, or water resources. With a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering technology, you’ll be prepared to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam, the first step in becoming licensed as a professional engineer. Graduates work in engineering roles in a variety of public agencies and private companies centered around civil engineering design and construction management.

The bachelor of science in civil engineering technology program is designed to support the growing need for engineers to design and retrofit new and existing facilities, including buildings, roads, bridges, and water supply and sewer systems. Students will gain practical theory, knowledge, and skills to become experts in applying today’s technology to the solution of civil engineering and construction problems. The program begins by providing students with a foundation in structural mechanics, physics, calculus, and the liberal arts. The third and fourth years expand on the fundamental courses with more advanced course work in structural design, water, and wastewater treatment, transportation systems, foundation engineering, and additional liberal arts courses. Students choose free electives and civil professional electives to round out their major. Professional electives include sequences in structural design, construction management, geotechnical engineering, transportation engineering, and water resources management. Several electives also are available from other technical disciplines. The student’s academic and faculty advisers can assist in determining the best choices for career goals and objectives. RIT’s program allows you to specialize while obtaining a broad background in civil engineering and construction management. Students also acquire over a year of on-the-job experience through cooperative education.

RIT’s program offers state-of-the-art equipment and sophisticated laboratories that allow for plenty of hands-on experience. You’ll have access to laboratories and equipment for soil mechanics, construction materials, surveying, water and wastewater analysis and treatment, hydraulic systems, and mechanics. You’ll also have access to our Design and Drafting Laboratory (DDL) with state-of-the-practice hardware and software such as AutoCAD, Revit, STAAD, HydroCAD, Civil3D, and much more.

Plan of study

In the first two years of the program, technical subjects are taught concurrently with mathematics and science, helping you to understand applications while studying scientific fundamentals. In labs, you’ll use experimental methods to solve engineering challenges and put theory and technology to work. Elective courses enable students to choose from a wide range of course options to further enhance their program of study and prepare them to achieve their career goals. RIT’s program allows you to specialize while obtaining a broad background. Students can specialize in one of three discipline-specific areas – structural design, construction management, or water resources. With a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering technology, you’ll be prepared to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam, the first step in becoming licensed as a professional engineer. Graduates work in engineering roles in a variety of public agencies and private companies centered around civil engineering design and construction management.

The major includes two technical electives and two free electives that can be used to gain additional depth or breadth in civil engineering or construction management. In addition, students may choose to utilize electives to pursue a minor outside of the civil engineering technology major or a professional option within the major.

Professional options

While choosing an option is not required, to gain a deep understanding in one particular focus area, students may choose to pursue one of three professional options in construction management, structural design, or water resources. Professional options consist of three courses chosen by the student.

Construction management–This option is ideal for students who have an interest in courses related to the business, management, and technical aspects related to construction.

Structural design–This option provides a focus on structural design and the use of different types of structures and materials. It also introduces related design codes.

Water resources–This option is for students who have an interest in courses related to water treatment, wastewater treatment, hydrology, and the environment.

Cooperative education

Cooperative education, or co-op, is an increasingly valuable integrated, co-curricular experience required by many programs in the college. Students gain real-world experience and make life-long professional connections while earning a salary, which may help offset college costs. Engineering technology students are required to complete four co-op blocks. This typically includes one spring, one fall, and two summer terms, alternating periods of full-time study with full-time paid work experience in their career field. In some circumstances, other forms of experiential education, such as study abroad, research, or military service, may be used to fulfill part of the co-op requirement. Each student is assigned a co-op advisor to assist in identifying and applying to co-op opportunities.

 

What does amazing look like?

Attend one of our Open House events and you’ll get a pretty good idea.

Industries


  • Civil Engineering

  • Construction

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

  • Architecture and Planning

Typical Job Titles

Civil Engineer Assistant Project Manager
Technician I Engineer I
Project Manager Civil Site Design Engineer
Design Engineer 1 Junior Design Engineer
Project Engineer Estimator
Junior Transportation Engineer CAD Drafter
Bridge Design Engineer Field Representative
Engineer Estimator Field Engineer
Junior Civil Engineer Staff Engineer
Civil/Design Engineer Staff Inspector
Construction Inspector Junior Structural Engineer
Construction Manager

99%

outcome rate of graduates

$55k

median first-year salary of graduates

Latest News

Curriculum

Civil Engineering Technology, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CVET-140
Materials of Construction
A study of common construction materials in civil engineering with particular emphasis on Portland cement concrete and asphalt cement concrete. Aggregates, Portland cement, and asphalt cement (each an ingredient in the concretes) are studied extensively. Mass-volume relationships are explored in relation to these materials. An overview of laboratory testing procedures for evaluating these materials is provided. Important properties of masonry, steel, and wood products are also discussed.
2
CVET-141
Materials of Construction Laboratory
The Materials of Construction Laboratory will be taken concurrently with Materials of Construction (CVET-140). Standard laboratory tests will be performed for evaluating the properties of aggregate, Portland cement concrete, asphalt cement concrete, and mortar. Mix design procedures for Portland cement concrete and asphalt cement concrete will be learned and used. An introduction to green building materials will be provided.
1
CVET-150
Computer Aided Design and Drafting
Introduction to engineering graphics as a means of communication in the technical fields. The course is laboratory oriented and provides the student with basic skills to create and edit professional 2D and 3D drawings with this comprehensive first course in the use of computer aided design and drafting (CADD) software for (mechanical, architectural and civil drawings). The course assumes no prior knowledge of engineering drawing or CADD.
2
CVET-180
Civil Engineering Graphics
The objective of this course is to develop in the student an understanding of plans and drawings in civil engineering projects such as site development, structures, hydraulic structures, water and wastewater transport and treatment facilities, and transportation facilities. Students will also understand how related disciplines—architecture, mechanical and electrical engineering, and landscape architecture—are incorporated into construction drawings. Students develop an understanding of the technical and legal purpose of plans and how to assemble them.
2
CVET-181
Civil Engineering Graphics Lab
The purpose of this course is to provide students with hands on learning of fundamental and innovative tools in the area of civil engineering graphics. Students will apply information from the co-requisite course to understand how construction drawing sets and drawing components are organized and generated. Spreadsheet methods will be used to solve design problems and building information modeling software will be introduced in the DDL computer lab.
1
CVET-210
Statics
An introduction to the analysis of static structures covering free-body diagrams, forces, moments, vectors, equilibrium, friction, and analysis of structures and truss members. Applications are drawn from civil engineering technology.
3
MATH-111
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Precalculus
This course provides the background for an introductory level, trigonometry-based calculus course. Topics include functions and their graphs, with an emphasis on functions that commonly appear in calculus including polynomials, rational functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions. The course also includes the analytic geometry of conic sections. One hour each week will be devoted to a collaborative learning workshop.
3
MATH-171
LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Calculus A
This is the first course in a three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). This course includes a study of functions, continuity, and differentiability. The study of functions includes the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Limits of functions are used to study continuity and differentiability. The study of the derivative includes the definition, basic rules, and implicit differentiation. Applications of the derivative include optimization and related-rates problems.
3
PHYS-111
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles): College Physics I
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings.
4
PHYS-112
College Physics II
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, fluids, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, opyics, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings.
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
0
 
First Year Writing 
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CHMG-141
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): General & Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
3
CHMG-145
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions.
1
CVET-160
Surveying
Introduction to fundamentals of surveying. Topics include note taking; differential leveling; vertical and horizontal measurement; traversing; topographic mapping; horizontal, vertical, compound and reverse curves; and earthwork.
3
CVET-161
Surveying Laboratory
Students apply the fundamentals of surveying to field exercises using modern surveying equipment. Field exercises include differential leveling, cross sections, traversing, topographic mapping, horizontal curve layout, vertical curve design, and earthwork estimation.
1
CVET-170
Elements of Building Construction
Elements and details of building construction, both residential and commercial, are explored. The course does not focus on design, but rather on specific building components, and on how these components work together to create a functional building. Some of the topics include foundations, wood light frame, heavy timber frame, steel, concrete, masonry, glass, roofing, cladding systems, and interior finishes. The role of building codes in design and construction is introduced. Sustainable building materials and systems are also introduced.
3
CVET-220
Strength of Materials
Study how forces and moments affect axial, shearing, and bending stresses and deflections of structural members. The relationships between stress and strain, for both axial and torsional loading, are explored. Beams, shafts, and columns are analyzed and designed based on stress and deformation. Combined stress states are analyzed, including using Mohr's circle. Statically indeterminate problems are evaluated. Euler's equations and column design principles are studied and applied.
4
CVET-230
Elementary Structures
Applications of the principles of statics and strength of materials to the analysis and design of basic structural elements in buildings such as beams, T-beams, columns, slabs, and footings. Topics include analysis of gravity loads in buildings, along with analysis and design of both structural steel and reinforced concrete members found in buildings. The Allowable Stress Design approach (AISC) is used for steel, while the ACI code is used for concrete. Design and analysis of steel connections are covered also.
3
CVET-240
Elementary Soil Mechanics
An introduction to soil mechanics and its application to problems encountered in civil engineering design and construction. Major topics include soil properties and classification, weight-volume relationships, compaction/ground improvement, groundwater flow, stresses in soils, settlement analysis, and shear strength.
3
CVET-241
Elementary Soil Mechanics Lab
The Elementary Soil Mechanics Laboratory will be taken concurrently with CVET-240. Standard laboratory tests will be performed for evaluating the properties of soils including gradation, plasticity, compaction, permeability, compressibility, and shear strength.
1
MATH-172
Calculus B
This is the second course in three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). The course includes Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite integral. The techniques of integration include substitution and integration by parts. The applications of the definite integral include areas between curves, and the calculation of volume.
3
MATH-211
Elements of Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations
This course includes an introduction to differential equations, Laplace transforms, numerical methods in differential equations, and the calculus of functions of two variables. The emphasis is on the application of these topics to problems in engineering technology.
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
Third Year
COMM-142
Introduction to Technical Communication (WI)
This course introduces students to current best practices in written and visual technical communication including writing effective email, short and long technical reports and presentations, developing instructional material, and learning the principles and practices of ethical technical communication. Course activities focus on engineering and scientific technical documents.
3
CVET-250
Hydraulics 
A study of the principle physical properties of liquids, hydrostatic pressure and forces, buoyancy and flotation, Bernoulli's Law, Conservation of Energy and Mass, and the concept of momentum. These fundamentals are applied in the analysis and design of closed conduit systems, open channel flow, pumps and pump selection and storage facilities. Rainfall runoff relationships and applications to stormwater management are also introduced.
3
CVET-251
Hydraulics Lab
Experimental study of principle physical properties of liquids and major laws of fluid mechanics. Students will conduct several experiments that illustrate the theory and design principles taught in lecture.
1
CVET-300
Land Development Computer Applications
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to civil 3D software and how to use the application and its tools to create standardized civil engineering and drafting projects. The course enables students to complete transportation, site, sewer, storm drain, and subdivision projects quickly, while using the tools to dynamically link and generate automatic design updates.
2
CVET-332
Structural Analysis with STAAD
Introduction of classical and modern computational techniques to analyze statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Topics include beams, 2D trusses, 2D frames, cables and arches, moving loads and influence lines, approximate methods and moment distribution. Computer-aided structural analysis using commercial structural analysis software STAAD is involved.
4
CVET-499
Civil Engineering Technology Co-op (spring, summer)
One semester or summer block of appropriate work experience in a related industry. Department permission is required.
0
ENGT-299
Career Seminar
This course is an introduction to the cooperative educational program at RIT, the programs in the department, and RIT resources. Topics include engineering technology vs. engineering, review of resources available at RIT, the cooperative education placement process, and the ethical expectations of employers for co-op students and RIT during a job search.
0
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Fourth Year
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics.
3
Choose one of the following course sequences:
6
  CVET-431
   Structural Design–Steel
Design of structural members and frames and their connections in steel structures. Topic include principles of structural design, structural loads and systems, steel grade and shapes, tension members, columns, non-composite and composite beams, beam-columns, column base plates, bolted connections and welded connections. The use of AISC Steel Manual is emphasized and a comprehensive group design project is assigned. Some computer work is involved.
 
  CVET-432
   Structural Design–Reinforced Concrete
Design of members and frames of reinforced concrete. Topics include principles of structural design; properties of concrete and reinforcement; design of slabs, beams, columns, and footings; and introduction to pre-stressed concrete. Emphasis is on the use of the ACI code, and a comprehensive group design project is assigned. Some computer work is involved.
 
  or
 
 
 
   Technical Electives
 
CVET-400
Transportation Engineering 
This course exposes students to the fields of highway, traffic engineering, airport and rail engineering. The areas of administration, planning, design, construction, maintenance and operation are covered. After the introductory material is presented, stress is put on specific skills needed in these fields, including highway, rail, and airport standards; geometry and alignment; traffic signal timing and design, drainage; earthwork; safety standards; and structures.
2
CVET-401
Transportation Engineering Lab
Students apply the fundamentals of highway design in the planning and design of a curbed highway, parking lot, and the necessary stormwater management facility. Students will use AutoCAD Civil 3D software as well as traffic engineering software that is commonly used at transportation agencies.
1
CVET-437
Principles of Dynamics in Civil Engineering Technology
Study of the basic principles of engineering dynamics. Topics include kinematics of particles, force, mass and acceleration, work and energy, force-impulse and momentum, and an introduction to vibrations and structural dynamics. Applications to practical civil engineering problems are emphasized.
2
CVET-440
Foundation Engineering
This course will study the geotechnical engineering aspects of foundation design. Focus is on bearing capacity analysis and spread footing design, mat foundations, pile capacity and pile foundation design, drilled shafts, lateral earth pressures and retaining wall design, and an introduction to slope stability analysis.
3
CVET-450
Principles of Water and Wastewater Treatment
An introduction to water and wastewater treatment, interpretation of analyzed physical, chemical, and biological aqueous characteristics associated with the design and operation of treatment processes. Fundamental principles and applications of physical, chemical, and biological processes employed in the treatment of drinking water and sanitary wastewater will be covered. Fundamental components and design procedures for gravity sewer systems will be introduced.
3
CVET-499
Civil Engineering Technology Co-op (summer)
One semester or summer block of appropriate work experience in a related industry. Department permission is required.
0
 
LAS Elective
3
 
Free Elective
3
 
LAS Immersion 1, 2
6
Fifth Year
CVET-499
Civil Engineering Technology Co-op (fall)
One semester or summer block of appropriate work experience in a related industry. Department permission is required.
0
CVET-500
CET Capstone (WI)
A capstone course in civil engineering technology. This course builds on and integrates the engineering concepts developed in prior course work into the complete design of a major civil engineering project. The course will require a written and an oral presentation of the completed design to include, where appropriate, plans and specifications.
3
 
Technical Elective
3
 
Free Elective
3
 
LAS Math or Science Elective
3
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
128

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Professional options

Construction Management
Choose three of the following:
  CVET-424
   Building Information Modeling with Revit
The primary objective of the Revit course is to teach students the concepts of Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology and introduce the tools for parametric building design and documentation using Revit Architecture. Students will be able to create full 3D architectural project models and generate working drawings. The course focuses on design development tools - building the 3D model with foundation, walls, windows, doors, floors, roofs, stairs, creating reflected ceiling plans and furniture plans. Students will add views and annotation to the sheets to create a set of construction documents.
  CVET-461
   Construction Cost Estimating I
An introduction to direct cost estimating for construction projects. The estimating techniques covered include quantity take-off, labor productivity, and pricing (labor, material, and equipment). Drawings, sketches, and specifications are used as a basis for developing quantities involving site work, concrete, masonry, steel, carpentry, and finishes. Students also use software tools to aid in developing takeoff quantities. Different estimate structures and various types of estimates are examined. Direct and indirect construction costs are explored along with approaches for estimating overhead costs and profit.
  CVET-462
   Construction Project Management
An introduction to construction management. Project administrative roles and relationships among the various project team participants are explored. Topics include specifics of construction project start-up including procurement, project buyout, and job site layout and control. Subcontracts and relationship with subcontractors are explored. Construction related documentation including contract documents, submittals, information requests, change orders, progress payments, bonds, insurances, and project closeout is discussed. Safety, quality, and project closeout are also covered.
  CVET-464
   Construction Planning, Scheduling and Control
This course covers planning, organization, scheduling, and control of construction projects. The components of construction project planning are examined. Students are exposed to and gain practice in using the Critical Path Method (CPM) in scheduling, Monte Carlo risk analysis and monitoring the progress of construction projects. Cost control and resource allocation/resource management are explored.
  CVET-465
   Contracts and Specifications
This course includes a fundamental overview of contract law, followed by the application of this material in the contracts for construction. Subsequently, the student is exposed to construction specifications. Substantial use is made of actual documents such as those of the New York State Department of Transportation, The Construction Specification Institute, and trade standards such as ANSI, ASTM, and others. Students are required to develop and assemble a mock-up set of contract documents. Arbitration, design-build, and partnering are discussed.
  CVET-505
   Sustainable Building Design & Construction
Course material will focus on the design, engineering, and construction of sustainable buildings and how the construction manager guides the project team to meet the owner's objectives of a sustainable facility. Students will explore the primary differences and similarities between the different green building rating systems, including the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council.
  ESHS-225
   Construction Safety
This course is designed to cover construction health and safety hazards and will study OSHA regulations in depth. Students get to handle and investigate construction safety issues, the OSHA standards addressing trench excavation, scaffolding, temporary electric circuits, fall protection, HAZCOM, underground construction are studied.
Structural Design
Required courses
CVET-431
Structural Design–Steel
Design of structural members and frames and their connections in steel structures. Topic include principles of structural design, structural loads and systems, steel grade and shapes, tension members, columns, non-composite and composite beams, beam-columns, column base plates, bolted connections and welded connections. The use of AISC Steel Manual is emphasized and a comprehensive group design project is assigned. Some computer work is involved.
CVET-432
Structural Design–Reinforced Concrete
Design of members and frames of reinforced concrete. Topics include principles of structural design; properties of concrete and reinforcement; design of slabs, beams, columns, and footings; and introduction to pre-stressed concrete. Emphasis is on the use of the ACI code, and a comprehensive group design project is assigned. Some computer work is involved.
Choose two of the following:
  CVET-433
   Structural Timber Design
Design wood structures. Topics include properties of structural lumber, design of wood structural members including beams, columns, beam-columns, trusses, studs, plywood diaphragms and shear walls, and design of structural member connections. Emphasis is on the use of NDC Wood Design Package. A comprehensive group design project. Some computer work is involved.
  CVET-434
   Design of Highway Bridges
Design concrete and steel bridges. Topics include types of bridges; design loads on bridges, design of prestressed concrete girders using CONSPAN, design of steel girders using MDX, design of reinforced concrete deck, design of foundations, and introduction to multi-span bridges. Emphasis is on the use of the AASHTO LRFD code and bridge design software, and a comprehensive group design project is assigned. Some computer work is involved.
  CVET-435
   Prestressed Concrete
This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of prestressed concrete design. Topics include prestressing systems, types of prestressing, materials used in prestressed concrete, analysis and design of pre- and post-tensioned systems, design of connections, losses in prestress. Emphasis is given on the use of the current industry standards and a design project.
  CVET-436
   Masonry Structures
This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of structural design with masonry elements. Topics include historical perspective of masonry technology, materials used in masonry construction, general design requirements for masonry, structural design of unreinforced and reinforced masonry elements, masonry construction practices, repairs and improvements to masonry walls. Emphasis is given on the use of the building codes for masonry structures and a comprehensive group design project.
Water Resources
Choose three of the following:
  CVET-423
   GIS for CETEMS
This course examines the fundamentals of geographic information systems and their application in the fields of civil engineering and environmental management. It emphasizes the application of GIS technology to problems such as, but not limited to, water resource management, asset management, environmental impact assessments, urban planning, and transportation. This course is restricted to 4th year CETEMS student or department permission.
  CVET-451
   Design of Water & Wastewater Treatment Facilities
Hydraulic, biological, and chemical principles of water and wastewater treatment processes are applied to the design of municipal treatment works. Process, plant design, and construction elements are stressed.
  CVET-452
   Groundwater Hydraulics
Groundwater movement analysis and engineering design applications. Topics include construction dewatering, groundwater remediation, flow-net analysis, flow analysis to wells and trenches, design of groundwater collection systems, pump selection, and groundwater's interaction with engineered structures. Application of groundwater computer software.
  CVET-453
   Stormwater Management
This course focuses on the fundamental design concepts of surface water hydrology and how these concepts are applied to the management of stormwater for municipal and development projects. Topics include rainfall/runoff relationships, groundwater hydrology, hydrographs, soil erosion and sediment control, storm sewer design, and green infrastructure. Practical engineering procedures, using desktop and state-of-the-practice hydraulic and hydrologic software, are introduced to analyze existing conditions and design new solutions.

Accreditation

The civil engineering technology major is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 3 years of math required; pre-calculus recommended
  • Chemistry or physics required; biology recommended
  • Technology electives desirable

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in mathematics, science, engineering science, and engineering technology

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

Civil, construction, environmental, architectural, transportation, or surveying technology; engineering science

Learn about admissions and financial aid 

Additional Info

Graduates

Our graduates can be found working in consulting engineering firms; construction and construction management companies; and government agencies at the local, regional, and national level. Initial job titles may include junior engineer, project manager, project engineer, estimator, junior structural engineer, construction inspector, project coordinator, or superintendent. Many graduates pursue advanced degrees, and a large number have gained registration in several states as professional engineers. Some manage their own consulting firms.

Industrial Advisory Board

The Industrial Advisory Board is comprised of local and regional industry leaders from consulting, construction, and the municipal market. These advisory board members share their professional and technical expertise to enhance the engineering technology program and strengthen its development.