Craft and Material Studies Minor

8500bded-036f-4e72-9050-1b7eea0f2a82 | 6218946

Overview

Students will develop knowledge of specific media, including wood, metal, ceramics, glass, and textiles. They also will study the material properties of these media and hone technical skills while expanding and applying critical thinking skills as they work through design process from ideation to fabrication. Students will also learn about expected working practices within collaborative studio spaces and within the discipline more broadly.

Notes about this minor:

  • This minor is closed to students majoring in studio arts who have chosen options in ceramics, glass, furniture design, and metals and jewelry design.
  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
  • Notations may appear in the curriculum chart below outlining pre-requisites, co-requisites, and other curriculum requirements (see footnotes).

The program code for Craft and Material Studies Minor is CAMS-MN.

Curriculum for Craft and Material Studies Minor

Course
Electives*
Choose five of the following for 15 credit hours
   CCER-201
   Ceramics Sophomore I†
This course will introduce students to wheel throwing techniques as used in functional ware. Emphasis will be placed on designing, preparation, and **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: STAR-250 equivalent course.STAR-250) Studio 12 (Fall).
   CCER-124
   Clay Studio Survey
This open elective course will introduce students to the glass studio and to glass as a creative material. The content of the course will focus on introductory tools, techniques, and experimentation. The students will learn basic skills and safety procedures for the Hot Shop, Flame Shop, Kiln Shop, and the Cold Shop. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information. ** (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with 1st or 2nd year standing.) Studio 5 (Fall Or Spring).
   CCER-128
   Josiah Wedgewood’s Legacy
This course will examine the evolution of 18th-century European ceramics under the influence of Josiah Wedgwood’s innovative spirit. Considered widely to be the father of modern marketing and manufacturing, potter, social activist, and politician Josiah Wedgwood built an empire from utilitarian objects underpinned by complex relationships between ceramics, technology, and culture. Through a combination of research-based exploration and hands-on, immersive learning, students will develop an understanding of the impact ceramics manufacturing had on such phenomena as social dynamics, social class, business practices, technologies that spurred advanced manufacturing, division of labor, and Neoclassical style. At the conclusion of this course, students will understand the significance of clay within history, the impact of pottery on culture in the age of imperialism, and how Wedgwood’s innovations endure today in the contemporary practices of studio pottery, ceramic manufacturing, and art. **This course requires a lab fee.** (This course is available to undergraduate students.) Studio 5 (Fall Or Spring).
   CCER-206
   Ceramic Sculpture Processes
This introductory course is designed to give the student an understanding of a variety of basic processes involved in creating hand-built ceramic objects, sculpture, and pottery vessels. There will be an emphasis on manipulating clay using forming techniques such as pinch, coil, solid, and slab building. Students will learn surface finishing processes such as textures and surface carving and decorating with slips, glaze applications, and gain a perspective on material science. The historical, cultural, and technical concerns of ceramics will be explored. These experiences will broaden the students' perspectives of ceramic art and its relationship to the larger world of art. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CCER-207
   Mold Mechanisms
This course will concentrate on the fundamentals of mold making for the production of vessel-oriented objects. The student will focus on the technical experience and challenges of working with plaster, making single piece press molds to multiple piece complex molds. The students will also study clay materials and clay chemistry, to better understand composition in relation to firing and surface development. Supporting information relating to historical, cultural, and scientific concerns will be provided to broaden the students' perspectives of ceramic art, design, and industry, as well as its relationship to the larger world of art. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CCER-211
   Thrown Vessel Forms
This course will introduce the student to beginning wheel forming techniques used in the ideation and creation of utilitarian vessels. There will be a focus on form, function and surface development. Students will engage in a variety finishing processes for surface development as well as slip and glaze application. Students will gain an understanding of a variety of firing techniques, as well as an introduction to material science to better understand the properties clay and glaze composition. The historical, cultural, and technical concerns of ceramics will be explored. These experiences will broaden the students' perspectives of ceramic art and its relationship to the larger world of art. Students will be expected to research areas of interest within ceramic history **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CCER-212
   Thrown Sculptural Forms
This course will introduce students to intermediate forming techniques used in the ideation and creation of both utilitarian and sculptural vessels. There will be a focus on form, surface development, and aesthetics. The student will gain experience with firing methodologies. The students will also work with material science to better understand clay and glaze chemistry. The historical, cultural, and technical concerns of ceramics will be explored. These experiences will broaden the students' perspectives of ceramic art and its relationship to the larger world of art. Students will be expected to research areas of interest within ceramic history or the field at large. This course will introduce students to the skills that are necessary for creating a variety of forms through assigned projects. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CCER-530
   Ceramics 3 Credit Elective
This is a class specifically designed for non-majors covering the fundamental techniques and aesthetics of working with clay. Topics covered include the forming techniques, clay mixing, basic properties of clay, glazing and firing techniques and fundamental understanding of historical and contemporary practices and applications. The course includes prescribed projects based on the number of studio hours. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Studio 5 (Fall, Spring).
   CGLS-124
   Glass Studio Survey
This open elective course will introduce students to the glass studio and to glass as a creative material. The content of the course will focus on introductory tools, techniques, and experimentation. The students will learn basic skills and safety procedures for the Hot Shop, Flame Shop, Kiln Shop, and the Cold Shop. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information.** (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with 1st or 2nd year standing.) Studio 5 (Fall Or Spring).
   CGLS-206
   Molten Glass Practice I
This course will introduce students to basic glass working processes in the hot glass studio. Solid and blown techniques are introduced as ways to activate ideas through molten glass. Students will learn introductory processes of finishing and further manipulating annealed glass in the cold shop. Students will build technical understanding and material comprehension in the application of these skills through assigned projects motivated by current themes in contemporary art. There is required out-of-class work time in the glass studio at a minimum of 6-9 hours per week **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information. ** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or ILLS-209 or PHAR-102 or SOFA-122 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CGLS-207
   Molten Glass Practice II
This introductory hot glass course will allow students to discover and/or rediscover fundamental solid and blown techniques through a fresh lens of instruction and ideas. The cold shop will be an additional studio where students will learn to use the equipment to further their projects. Contemporary themes surrounding material experimentation, problem-solving and making a mess will be the springboards for prompted assignments. There is a required out-of-class work time in glass studio at a minimum of 6-9 hours per week **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information. ** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or ILLS-209 or PHAR-102 or SOFA-122 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CGLS-211
   Mold & Kiln Glass Practice
This course will introduce students to basic mold making and glass working processes in the kiln studio. Fusing, slumping, and casting techniques will be covered as ways to activate ideas through kiln formed glass. In addition, basic processes of finishing glass in the cold shop will also be introduced. Students will build technical understanding and material comprehension in the application of these skills within self-directed projects motivated by prompted themes found within contemporary art. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information. ** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or ILLS-209 or PHAR-102 or SOFA-122 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CGLS-212
   Kinetic Glass Practice
This course will introduce students to basic flame working processes. Solid working techniques with borosilicate glass will be covered as ways to activate ideas about making glass move. Basic processes of finishing and further manipulating annealed glass in the cold shop will also be introduced. Students will build technical understanding and material comprehension in the application of these skills within personally developed projects motivated by themes regarding mechanics, the experimental, and absurdity. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information. ** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or ILLS-209 or PHAR-102 or SOFA-122 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CGLS-530
   Glass Processes
This course will introduce the beginner to the glass studio and to glass as a creative material. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Studio 6 (Fall, Spring).
   CMTJ-124
   Metals and Jewelry Studio Survey
This course is an introduction to the field of metals and jewelry design. It is designed to develop fundamental skills in working with nonferrous metal through various metalsmithing processes and techniques. The course will focus on the understanding of materials and processes for the fabrication of small objects and jewelry. Decorative surface texture, pattern and forming techniques will be studied as well as cold connection, soldering and hollow construction. The course will also explore the use of alternative materials as a medium to create work along an assigned theme or conceptual framework. The student will learn to evaluate new techniques, materials and concepts to succeed in more advanced Studio Arts course. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information. ** (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with 1st or 2nd year standing.) Studio 5 (Fall Or Spring).
   CMTJ-206
   Methods and Practice
This course will introduce students to basic jewelry hand tools. Students will learn about composition and working properties of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, which will serve as primary materials. This course will provide in-depth instruction on fundamental design and fabrication techniques. Students will acquire technical understanding and demonstrate the comprehension of materials through assigned projects motivated by current themes in contemporary art and jewelry design. Students will be instructed on the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop. Students will be required to conduct research on a historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CMTJ-207
   Design, Fabrication, and Forming
This course will introduce the student to intermediate silver soldering and gem setting. Students will explore forming techniques used in the fabrication of jewelry and functional objects. Students will acquire technical understanding and demonstrate the comprehension of materials through assigned projects motivated by current themes in contemporary art and jewelry design. Students will be instructed on the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop. Students will be required to conduct research on a historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation. Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CMTJ-211
   Design and Fabrication
Students will engage in fundamental design and fabrication techniques, materials, and processes within the broad historical and social context of jewelry design and metalworking. Working with precious and non-precious metals, students will learn traditional metal and jewelry methods of construction and fabrication. Students will acquire technical understanding and demonstrate the comprehension of materials through assigned projects motivated by current themes in contemporary art and jewelry design. Students will be instructed on the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop. Students will be required to conduct research on an historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CMTJ-212
   Fabrication, Casting, and Mold Making
The course focuses on the fundamentals of jewelry and metal design. Current styles and formal characteristics of jewelry and metal objects will be studied through a series of design problems. Students will learn casting and mold-making techniques for small scale objects and jewelry. Instruction will include vacuum assisted and centrifuge casting, sand casting, wax carving, replica casting, and silicone rubber mold making. Students will acquire technical understanding and demonstrate the comprehension of materials through assigned projects motivated by current themes in contemporary art and jewelry design. Students will be instructed on the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop. Students will be required to conduct research on a historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CMTJ-530
   Form and Fabrication: Metals and Jewelry Design
This is an elective course providing an opportunity for introductory study in metals: either hollowware or jewelry. Development of metals techniques, design fundamentals and encouragement of personal expression will be encouraged. The student will learn to evaluate new techniques, materials and concepts. Slide lectures, technical demonstrations, field trips, hands-on experience and critiques will be used. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Studio 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   CWFD-124
   Woodworking / Furniture Design Studio Survey
This open elective course will introduce students to the furniture design studio and to wood as creative material. The content of the course will focus on the introduction of tools and techniques in woodworking and the creative design process. Students will learn basic skills and safety procedures for using hand tools and machine tools. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information.** (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with 1st or 2nd year standing.) Studio 5 (Fall Or Spring).
   CWFD-206
   Furniture Design: The Table
This course covers fundamental woodworking techniques associated with furniture design and construction. Through ideation and conceptual development, students will investigate the functional and aesthetic considerations of table design. Topics covered will include wood as a material and its basic properties, design development through drawing and modelmaking, the use and care of hand tools such as chisels and saws, and the safe use of stationary power tools. Students will be introduced to wood joinery best suited for table construction including halved and bridle joints, and simple mortise and tenon construction. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CWFD-207
   Intro to Woodworking and Furniture Design: Bench Seating
This course covers intermediate woodworking techniques associated with furniture design and construction. With a focus on aesthetics, structure, and functionality, students will design and construct furniture for seating such as a stools and benches. Topics covered will include intermediate joinery techniques, lathe turning, hand and power shaping, and the safe use of the multi-router, router table and rotary carving tools. These topics will support the focus on craftsmanship, technical knowledge and design development. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information.** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CWFD-211
   Intro to Woodworking and Furniture Design: Carving and Shaping
This course will provide students with fundamental techniques necessary to design and fabricate refined hand carved vessels and other wooden objects. Participants in this course will gain an understanding of the inherent properties of wood, identifying assets and limitations of the material as they design and build. Students will develop skills to formalize individual design ideas for presentation, planning and construction. Topics will include lumber selection, the safe and proper use of machinery and portable power tools, the care and use of gouges, spokeshaves. and other sharp-edged hand tools, as well as sanding and wood finishing and will support the focus on craftsmanship, technical knowledge and design development. **Fee: There is a materials fee required for this course and an additional course fee applied via SFS bill. See course notes for course fee information.** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Fall).
   CWFD-212
   Intro to Woodworking and Furniture Design: Boxes and Containers
This course covers the fundamental techniques associated with the design and construction of wooden boxes. Students will design and build a series of functional containers giving careful consideration to the inherent properties of the material. Course topics will include lumber selection and processing, joinery layout and corner joint construction, as well as the safe use of hand and power tools. Lid and hinging options, as well as intermediate hand finishing techniques will also be introduced. Demonstrations, presentations, discussions, critiques, as well as individual meetings with students, will support the focus on craftsmanship, technical knowledge and design development. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (Prerequisites: FDTN-112 or FDTN-212 or FDTN-122 or FDTN-222 or FDTN-132 or FDTN-232 or FDTN-141 or IDDE-102 or ILLS-206 or ILLS-209 or INDE-102 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
   CWFD-530
   Furniture Design 3 Credit Elective
This is a class designed for non-majors, covering a fundamental introduction to techniques and aesthetics of woodworking. Topics covered include the use of select hand tools and woodworking power tools, wood as a material, its basic properties and fundamental processes of wood fabrication. The course includes a prescribed project based on five in-class contact hours. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Studio 5 (Fall, Spring).
    CWTD-530
   Quilting Elective
This course will introduce the beginner to the textile studio and to quilting as a creative process. This can be repeated to allow students to develop additional skills. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Studio 6 (Fall, Spring).
   FDTN-132
   3D Design II
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community. (Prerequisites: FDTN-131 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring, Summer).
   FDTN-232
   3D Design II Workshop: Topic
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor. (Prerequisites: FDTN-131 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).

* At least two courses must be taken at the 200-level or above.