Electrical Engineering Technology Bachelor of science degree

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Overview

Develop an in-depth understanding of electrical and electronics theory and its application, applied design, and implementation to electrical and electronic systems in RIT's electrical engineering technology degree.


Electrical engineering technology is designed to meet industry’s ever-increasing need for engineers with an in-depth understanding of electrical and electronics theory. The degree provides students with the ability to specialize in specific areas of the discipline. Graduates work as engineers in a variety of industries including automotive, medical devices, power and energy, audio, telecommunications, and more.

What you’ll study

The BS in electrical engineering technology degree provides students with a foundation in circuits, analog, and digital electronics, physics, and calculus. The third and fourth years expand on fundamental courses with more advanced courses in advanced circuits and electronics, transform methods, control systems, analog, and digital electronics, and applied differential equations. Students are able to choose from multiple electives to round out their degree. Electives include sequences in power systems, electronic communications, embedded systems, telecommunications, networking, and optics. Electives are also available in other technical disciplines, and the student’s academic advisor can assist in determining the best choices to meet career goals and objectives. The major provides a viable option for students who have already completed an associate degree and wish to complete a bachelor of science degree.

Core courses are introduced in the first year of study to provide students with a solid foundation in circuits, analog and digital electronics, computer programming, and calculus. The curriculum expands in later years to feature advanced study in advanced circuits and electronics, transform methods, control systems, analog, and digital electronics, and applied differential equations. Elective courses enable students to choose from a wide range of course options to further enhance their program of study and prepare them to archive their career goals. The major provides a viable option for students who have already completed an associate degree and wish to complete a bachelor of science degree.

A solid foundation in math, science, and the liberal arts, coupled with specialization in students’ particular areas of interest prepares graduates to immediately enter the workforce as design engineers or pursue advanced degrees. Electrical engineering technology majors will gain in-depth knowledge and a breadth of experience that inspire them to pursue successful careers in their chosen professional field and embark on a path of lifelong learning.

Students will also complete required cooperative education experiences designed to provide real, hands-on engineering experience in industry.

Options

Students who wish to specialize in a particular area of industry, or those who desire to pursue a personal interest, may elect to use electives to complete a four-course option in audio or telecommunications.

Industries


  • Automotive

  • Computer Networking

  • Construction

  • Defense

  • Electronic and Computer Hardware

  • Manufacturing

  • Medical Devices

  • Oil and Gas

Typical Job Titles

Electrical Engineer Design Engineer
Research Engineer Project Engineer
Applications Engineer Controls Engineer
Test Engineer

100%

outcome rate of graduates

$70K

median first-year salary of graduates

Cooperative Education

Cooperative education, or co-op for short, is full-time, paid work experience in your field of study. And it sets RIT graduates apart from their competitors. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries. RIT co-op is designed for your success

Students in the electrical engineering technology degree are required to complete four co-op blocks. This typically includes one spring, one fall, and two summer blocks. You'll alternate periods of full-time study with full-time paid work experience in your career field. In some circumstances, other forms of experiential education (e.g., study abroad, research, military service) may be used to fulfill part of the co-op requirement. Each student is assigned a co-op advisor to assist in identifying and applying to co-op opportunities.

Explore salary and career information for Electrical Engineering Technology BS 

Curriculum for Electrical Engineering Technology BS

Electrical Engineering Technology, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CPET-121
General Education – Elective: Computational Problem Solving I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence in computational problem solving of engineering and scientific problems. The problems solved will stress the application of sequence, selection, repetitive, invocation operations, and arrays. The development of proper testing procedures to ensure computational accuracy will be stressed. Students, upon successful completion of this course, will be able to analyze introductory engineering and scientific problems, design, code, test, and document procedural software solutions. Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
CPET-133
Introduction to Digital and Microcontroller Systems
This course introduces students to the underlying building blocks of digital system and microcontroller design. Digital systems topics that are covered include: number systems, truth tables, Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential logic, and finite state machines. A microcontroller is used to teach register programming, reading and writing digital I/O, bitwise operations and bit-masking and microprocessor architecture. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
2
EEET-111
DC Circuits
Develops the skills to analyze and design practical DC circuits used in electronic devices. Topics include resistance with circuit techniques of Ohm's Law; current and voltage division; simplification of series, parallel, series-parallel circuits: bridge and ladder networks: Kirchhoff's source conversions, branch analysis; Thevenin and Norton theorems; superposition theorems and nodal analysis. Inductance and capitance are introduced and transient circuits are studied. (Co-requisites: EEET-112 and (MATH-111 or MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
EEET-112
DC Circuits Lab
Develops skills and practice in the design, fabrication, measurement and analysis of practical DC circuits used in electronic devices. Topics include the measurement relative to: resistance, current, and voltage with circuit techniques of Ohm's Law; current and voltage division; simplification of series, parallel, series-parallel circuits: bridge and ladder networks: Kirchhoff's Laws; power; and transient circuit behavior. Laboratory verification of DC analytical and techniques is included. Printed circuit board (PCB) design, fabrication, and assembly is also included emphasizing the development of soldering skill proficiency. (Co-requisites: EEET-111 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
EEET-121 3
EEET-122
AC Circuits Lab
Develops skills and practice in the design, fabrication, measurement, and analysis of practical AC circuits used in electrical systems. Topics include network theorems, reactance and impedance, AC power and power factor, resonance, maximum power transfer, frequency response, and bandwidth. (Co-requisites: EEET-121 or equivalent courses.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
MATH-111
General Education – Elective: Precalculus
This course provides the background for an introductory level, trigonometry-based calculus course. Topics include functions and their graphs, with an emphasis on functions that commonly appear in calculus including polynomials, rational functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions. The course also includes the analytic geometry of conic sections. One hour each week will be devoted to a collaborative learning workshop. (Prerequisites: Students may not take and receive credit for MATH-101 and MATH-111. See the Math department with any questions.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-171
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Calculus A
This is the first course in a three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). This course includes a study of functions, continuity, and differentiability. The study of functions includes the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Limits of functions are used to study continuity and differentiability. The study of the derivative includes the definition, basic rules, and implicit differentiation. Applications of the derivative include optimization and related-rates problems. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-111 or C- or better in ((NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) and NMTH-220) or a math placement exam score greater than or equal to 50.) Lecture 5 (Fall, Spring).
3
UWRT-150
General Education – First Year Writing: FYW: Writing Seminar (WI)
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing. Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
CPET-233
Digital Systems Design
This course covers the design and simulation of digital circuits using modern digital design techniques. Using a hardware description language, students will design, synthesize, and analyze finite state machines and combinational, sequential, and arithmetic logic circuits. Topics will include design for synthesis, verification techniques, memory circuits, programmable logic devices, and implementation technologies. The laboratories are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. (Prerequisites: CPET-133 or (CPET-141 and CPET-142) or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
CPET-253
Microcontroller Systems
This course presents typical structures and applications of microcontroller systems. Emphasis will be on: hardware, programming, input/output methods, typical peripherals/interfacing (including Timers, ADC and micro to micro communications), interrupt handling and small system design and applications using high level programming languages. Microprocessor architecture and assembly programming will be introduced to provide a base for more advanced digital designs. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. (Prerequisites: CPET-121 and (CPET-133 or (CPET-141 and CPET-142)) or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
EEET-213
Electronic Devices
This course covers the analysis, design and implementation of active electronic circuits using diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors and operational amplifiers. The electrical and switching characteristics of semiconductor devices used for analog and digital circuits will be emphasized. Classic applications of analog signal conditioning, A/D & D/A conversion and power transformation (AC/DC & DC/DC) will be examined. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. (Prerequisites: ((EEET-121 and EEET-122) or (EEET-215 and EEET-216)) and (MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A) or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
EEET-223
Advanced Electronics
This course develops the knowledge and skills essential for the analysis, design, and implementation of electronic sensor circuits and their interface to a microcontroller. Analog signal conditioning circuits, active filters, data converters and voltage regulators will be emphasized. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. (Prerequisites: (C- or better in EEET-213) and (CPET-133 or (CPET-141 and CPET-142)) or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
4
MATH-172
General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Calculus B
This is the second course in three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). The course includes Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite integral. The techniques of integration include substitution and integration by parts. The applications of the definite integral include areas between curves, and the calculation of volume. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-171 or 1016-171T or 1016-281 or 1016-231 or equivalent course.) Lecture 5 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-211
General Education – Elective: Elements of Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations
This course includes an introduction to differential equations, Laplace transforms, numerical methods in differential equations, and the calculus of functions of two variables. The emphasis is on the application of these topics to problems in engineering technology. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or 1016-232 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
PHYS-111
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective: College Physics I
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
 
General Education- Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective
4
Third Year
EEET-241
Electrical Machines and Transformers
Develops the knowledge and ability to analyze and specify motors, generators, and transformers for use in systems such as wind turbines and electric vehicles. Topics include efficiency, energy conservation, power factor, magnetism, electro-magnetic force, fields, armatures, commutators, rotors, stators, brushes, starters, controllers, DC machines, AC motors, alternators, single phase and three phase dynamos, three phase circuits, phasors, transformer properties, isolation, efficiency, and voltage regulation. (Prerequisites: (EEET-121 and EEET-122) or (EEET-215 and EEET-216) or equivalent courses. Co-Requisites: EEET-242 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
EEET-242
Electrical Machines and Transformers Lab
Provides experience with motors, generators, and transformers. Topics include power factor, magnetism, electro-magnetic force, fields, armatures, commutators, rotors, stators, brushes, starters, controllers, DC machines, AC motors, alternators, single phase and three phase dynamos, three phase circuits, phasors, transformer properties, isolation, efficiency, and voltage regulation. (Co-requisites: EEET-241 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
EEET-299
Career Orientation
This course is an introduction to the professional engineering careers, cooperative educational program at RIT, the programs in the department, and RIT resources. Topics include engineering technology vs. engineering, review of resources available at RIT, the cooperative education placement process, working in a diverse workforce, and engineering ethics including the IEEE Code of Ethics. The ethical expectations of employers for co-op students and RIT during a job search. (This class is restricted to students with at least 3rd year student standing in EEET-BS or CPET-BS.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
EEET-331
Signals, Systems and Transforms
Develops the analytical skills to design, develop, and simulate analog and digital filters, control systems, and advanced electronic circuits such as those used in robotics, digital communications, and wireless systems. Continuous-time and discrete-time linear, time-invariant, casual systems are examined throughout the course. Topics include Fourier series, the Laplace transform, signal sampling, and the z-transform. Advanced circuit analysis techniques include circuit characterization in the s-plane. (Prerequisites: EEET-121 and EEET-122 and (MATH-211 or MATH-231) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEET-332 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
EEET-332
Signals, Systems and Transforms Lab
MATLAB is introduced and used extensively to analyze circuits on continuous-time and discrete-time systems. PSPICE is utilized for circuit simulation. (Prerequisites: EEET-121 and EEET-122 and (MATH-211 or MATH-231) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEET-331 or equivalent course.) Lab 1 (Fall).
1
EEET-499
Cooperative Education – Electrical Engineering Technology (spring, summer)
One semester or summer block of appropriate work experience in a related industry. Students are required to complete a poster and presentation and participate in the ECTET co-op presentation evening at the completion of each co-op experience. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: (CPET-253 or (CPET-251 and CPET-252)) and (EEET-313 or (EEET 311 and EEET 312)) and EEET-299 or equivalent course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
STAT-145
General Education – Elective: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
 
Open Elective 
3
Fourth Year
EEET-313
Communications Electronics
Develops the knowledge and ability to design communication electronics, such as AM/FM radios using transistors and integrated circuits. This course applies the concepts of circuits and electronics to basic analog communication circuits for amplitude and frequency modulation. Topics studied are RF Amplifiers, Fourier Analysis, AM and FM transmission and reception, phase-locked loops, synthesizers, oscillators, DSB and SSB communication systems, antennas and EM wave propagation. The course’s laboratory component Provides experience in the practice and application of the concepts of circuits and electronics to basic analog communication circuits for amplitude and frequency modulation in a laboratory environment. Construction and measurement are emphasized. Student must register for BOTH the Lecture and Laboratory components of this course. (Prerequisite: C- or better in (EEET-221 and EEET-222) or EEET-223 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
EEET-425
Digital Signal Processing (WI-PR)
Develops the knowledge and ability to process signals using Digital Signal Processing (DSP) techniques. Starts with foundational concepts in sampling, probability, statistics, noise, fixed and floating point number systems, and describes how they affect real world performance of DSP systems. Fundamental principles of convolution, linearity, duality, impulse responses, and discrete fourier transforms are used to develop FIR and IIR digital filters and to explain DSP techniques such as windowing. Students get an integrated lab experience writing DSP code that executes in real-time on DSP hardware. (Prerequisites: EEET-331 and EEET-332 and STAT-145 or MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
EEET-427
Control Systems
Develops the knowledge of control system concepts and applies them to electromechanical systems. Systems are characterized and modeled using linear systems methods, focused with a controls perspective. Impulse responses, step responses, and transfer functions are reviewed. Principles of stability and damping are developed and applied to the specification and design of open and closed loop compensators to deliver specific input-output performance. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. Student must register for BOTH the Lecture and Laboratory components of this course. (Prerequisites: MATH-211 or MATH-231 and (CPET-253 or (CPET-251 and CPET-252)) or (EEET-247 and EEET-248) or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
4
EEET-499
Cooperative Education – Electrical Engineering Technology (summer)
One semester or summer block of appropriate work experience in a related industry. Students are required to complete a poster and presentation and participate in the ECTET co-op presentation evening at the completion of each co-op experience. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: (CPET-253 or (CPET-251 and CPET-252)) and (EEET-313 or (EEET 311 and EEET 312)) and EEET-299 or equivalent course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Technical Elective
3
 
Mechanical Manufacturing Engineering Technology Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Open Electives
6
Fifth Year
EEET-433
Transmission Lines
Develops the knowledge and ability to analyze, design, and measure high frequency signal transmission media as applied to digital and RF systems. Topics include the propagation of electromagnetic waves on wire media; transmission line voltage, current, loss and impedance; graphical methods for analysis; transmission lines as circuit elements, application of the general transmission line equation as derived from the LC distributed model. During the course’s laboratory component, students learn proper transmission line instrumentation techniques and design transmission line circuits that meet design specifications. (Prerequisite: C- or better in EEET-331 and EEET-332 and MATH-211 or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
EEET-499
Cooperative Education – Electrical Engineering Technology (fall)
One semester or summer block of appropriate work experience in a related industry. Students are required to complete a poster and presentation and participate in the ECTET co-op presentation evening at the completion of each co-op experience. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: (CPET-253 or (CPET-251 and CPET-252)) and (EEET-313 or (EEET 311 and EEET 312)) and EEET-299 or equivalent course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
 
General Education – Elective
4
 
Open Elective
3
 
Technical Elective
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
127

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Options

Students may choose to use their two technical electives and two free electives to complete an option in audio or telecommunications.

Audio
EEET-261
Fundamentals of Audio Engineering
This course provides a fundamental study of the technology and practice used in recording, editing, mixing, production, and distribution of sound. Topics include microphone types, selection and application the mixing console, mixing techniques and introduction to Signal Processing equipment and associated techniques, an introduction to the concepts relating to digital audio technology such as sampling, the Nyquist theorem, alias frequencies, quantization, dynamic range, compression and their applications will be covered. Topics include basics of digital audio, session creation, importing media, recording techniques, editing, mixing, and mastering. In addition, the course teaches how-to-listen sonic difference to appropriately apply the technical knowledge and to achieve highest sound quality. (Prerequisites: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
EEET-361
Modern Audio Production
Sound, voice, music, and effects play a critical role in telephone communication and entertainment systems. Development of integrated multi-channel acoustic information is a complex process. This course provides an intermediate level study of the technology used in recording, editing, mixing, and mastering audio. Students are introduced to core concepts and skills necessary to operate a system running large sessions with up to 48 tracks. Students will develop an appreciation of and the requisite skills to create, organize, mix, filter, process, enhance, and coordinate sound information in digital format. Topics include MIDI, virtual instruments, filtering, processing for sound enhancement, editing and adjusting time bases, mixing and mastering, and audio production. Students will develop critical listening skills as well as technical skills. (Prerequisites: EEET-261 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
Choose two of the following:
   CPET-421
   Applied Audio Programming
The modern audio industry seeks individuals who can implement creative tools for audio and music engineers. This course teaches students how to develop audio software and/or applications for music, sound, and audio engineering and assists them in acquiring programming skills for the audio industry. The course consists of four sections: (1) fundamentals of audio signal processing, (2) audio effects used in digital audio equipment (e.g. digital mixers), (3) applied audio signal processing technologies, and (4) Virtual Studio Technology (VST) plugin programing. The sub-topics include (but are not limited to) gain, delay, filter structures (IIR, FIR), EQ, Reverberator, Compressor, Beamforming, Adaptive filtering, VST plugin development. Students will be evaluated through both knowledge on audio signal processing and practical implementation of a VST plugin as a final project. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   EEET-451
   3D Audio: Theory and Practice
3D audio refers to a method to generate and deliver an immersive audio field that is integrated with 3D video. The course covers theoretical and practical aspects of 3D audio: capturing auditory information of a venue using multi-microphone techniques (discrete multichannel methods, microphone arrays, and binaural capture), rendering the captured information using spatial signal processing (Inverse filtering, VBAP and Crosstalk Cancellation), transmitting and delivering as multichannel audio format, and recreating the original auditory information (multichannel loudspeaker reproduction and applying inverse filter for room compensation). In addition, the course will teach the fundamentals of the architectural acoustics (acoustics of a space) and the psycho-acoustics (recognized acoustics by listeners). The course includes practical exercises through which students can evaluate the spatial audio techniques discussed in the course and reproduce immersive multichannel sound and music. (Prerequisites: EEET-261 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
   EEET-461
   Introduction to Acoustics
This course introduces the student to sound as both a physical and psychological phenomenon. The course explains the nature of sound in terms of acoustic pressure and provides an overview of how humans receive and perceive sound. Sound waves are also introduced, starting with the development of the acoustic wave equation and its solution for plane and spherical waves with harmonic sources. The concepts of acoustic intensity and acoustic impedance are presented. The course also includes study of basic sound sources as well as the absorption, reflection, scattering and diffraction of sound by various physical structures. (Prerequisites: (MATH-172 or MATH-182) and ((PHYS-111 or 1017-211) or (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Biannual).
   EEET-561
   Audio Power Amplifiers
Develops knowledge of audio power amplifier design and audio signal measurement methods. Covers digital and analog amplifiers from high power (concert halls) to low power (cell phones and handheld digital media devices). Topics include digital sound synthesis using class D switching amplifiers, analog amplifiers, distortion, noise, stability, filtering, heatsinking, efficiency, and low power modes. (Prerequisites: EEET-221 and EEET-222 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: EEET-425 or equivalent course.) Lab 1, Lecture 2 (Biannual).
Telecommunications
CPET-481
Networking Technologies
EEET-313
Communication Electronics
Develops the knowledge and ability to design communication electronics, such as AM/FM radios using transistors and integrated circuits. This course applies the concepts of circuits and electronics to basic analog communication circuits for amplitude and frequency modulation. Topics studied are RF Amplifiers, Fourier Analysis, AM and FM transmission and reception, phase-locked loops, synthesizers, oscillators, DSB and SSB communication systems, antennas and EM wave propagation. The course’s laboratory component Provides experience in the practice and application of the concepts of circuits and electronics to basic analog communication circuits for amplitude and frequency modulation in a laboratory environment. Construction and measurement are emphasized. Student must register for BOTH the Lecture and Laboratory components of this course. (Prerequisite: C- or better in (EEET-221 and EEET-222) or EEET-223 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
EEET-525
Wireless RF Systems
Develops the knowledge and ability to apply representative regulatory requirements for wireless mobile and fixed radio frequency communication systems. Topics include: the radio frequency mobile wireless environment, the common wireless systems, and regulatory aspects related to deployment of the wireless infrastructure. (Prerequisites: EEET-313 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
EEET-531
Fiber Optics Technology
This course presents the basic technologies of fiber-optic telecommunications systems including optical fiber, light sources and modulators, photodetectors and receivers, and passive components such as optical mux/demux and couplers. Studens will learn the principle of operation of these technologies as well as gain practical hands-on experience in the labaratory. Students will also learn how to design and assess a fiber-optic link impaired by attenuation and dispersion. (Prerequisites: EEET-331 and EEET-332 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall Or Spring).

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 3 years of math required; pre-calculus recommended
  • Chemistry or physics required; biology recommended
  • Technology electives desirable

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in mathematics, science, engineering science, and engineering technology

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

Electrical technology, electronic technology, engineering science

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

Accreditation

The electrical engineering technology major is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET.

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