Telecommunications Engineering Technology master of science degree

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Overview

The telecommunications industry has driven technological innovation and provided outstanding career opportunities for people with the right technical and leadership skills. New services offered through the internet, mobility via wireless technology, and extreme capacity created by fiber optics, as well as the evolution of policy and regulation, are shaping the telecommunication network of the future. The MS in telecommunications engineering technology focuses on developing an advanced level of skill and knowledge needed by future leaders in the industry. This program is designed for individuals who seek advancement into managerial roles in the dynamic telecommunications environment.

Plan of study

The program requires 33 credit hours of study and includes eight core courses that introduce essential fundamental concepts and skills. Students are required to complete a comprehensive exam, a capstone project, or a thesis. The remaining credits consist of technical electives or other approved graduate courses.

Cooperative education

Full-time students may choose to complete cooperative education.  After completing two semesters (a minimum of 18 credit hours of study), students may request approval to complete up to one year of cooperative education employment related to their field of study.

Comprehensive Exam/Project/Thesis options

All students are required to complete a comprehensive exam at the conclusion of their course work. The comprehensive exam focuses on knowledge of the core competencies, theory and foundation principles, and application of this knowledge to a variety of scenarios. Students who wish to complete a graduate project or a thesis in place of the comprehensive exam must have the approval of the faculty and the graduate program director.

Industries


  • Telecommunications

  • Computer Networking

  • Electronic and Computer Hardware

  • Defense

Latest News

  • April 9, 2018

    Members of REDCOM and RIT pose for a group photo outside the REDCOM office.

    REDCOM donates equipment to telecom lab

    REDCOM, a long-time partner of the telecommunications engineering technology program at RIT, recently donated its call control software to the university to provide students access to the latest technology being used for digital and IP-enabled telecommunications networks.

Curriculum

Telecommunications engineering technology (thesis option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
TCET-710
Principles of Telecommunication
The course provides the student with a solid understanding of local access and backbone network, architecture, equipment and technology related to the Public Switched Telephone (PSTN), Cable (MSO), Access and Converged/IP networks. Passive Optical Networking and Hybrid Fiber Coax technology is also covered.
3
TCET-750
Wireless Infrastructure and Policy
The fundamental principles of and U.S. regulatory requirements for wireless mobile and fixed radio frequency communication systems are studied in this course. At the end of this course, students will understand the radio frequency mobile wireless environment, the common wireless systems, and the regulatory aspects related to deployment of the wireless infrastructure.
3
GRCS-701
Research Methods
This is an introductory graduate-level survey course on research design/methods and analysis. The course provides a broad overview of the process and practices of research in applied contexts. Content includes principles and techniques of research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis including the nature of evidence, types of research, defining research questions, sampling techniques, data collection, data analysis, issues concerning human subjects and research ethics, and challenges associated with conducting research in real-world contexts. The analysis component of the course provides an understanding of statistical methodology used to collect and interpret data found in research as well as how to read and interpret data collection instruments.
3
TCET-740
Fiber Optic Telecommunications Technology 
This course presents the basic technologies of fiber-optic telecommunications systems including optical fiber, light sources and modulators, photodiodes and receivers, optical amplifiers, and passive components such as dispersion compensators, optical multiplexers and demultiplexers, and couplers. Fundamental concepts as well as state-of-the-art advances in these technologies will be covered.
2
TCET-741
Fiber Optic Telecommunications Technology Lab
This course provides extensive hands-on experience with basic technologies of fiber-optic telecommunications systems including optical fiber, light sources, and photodiodes, and key diagnosics such as optical time-domain reflectometers and optical spectrum analyzers. Students will measure the fiber impairements of dispersion and attenuation, and train in laser safety, fiber connector inspection, and fusion splicing.(MSTET accepted student or permission of instructor)
1
TCET-720
Telecommunications Concepts
The course provides the student with a solid understanding of Digital and Time Division Multiplexing and Modulation schemes used in the transmission of information in a variety of networks, both packet and circuit switched. Traffic engineering and Quality of Service concepts are covered as well as a number of network protocols and signaling platforms such as MPLS and SIP.
3
TCET-760
Network Planning and Design
This course teaches the art and science of metropolitan and wide area network design for both modern delay (data) networks and traditional blocking (voice) networks; the greatest emphasis is on modern delay networks. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are used as the student progresses through the network analysis, architecture and network design processes. An advanced WAN Fiber Optic design tool, such as OPNET Transport Planner is utilized in a required graduate project. The following are typical types of projects: Write an RFP, design an extensive metropolitan and wide area network using the latest technologies, design an extensive fiber optic network using a design tool like OPNET Transport Planner. Note: Since some students may not yet have taken a fiber course, the OPNET project stresses the use of the tool rather than the specifics of fiber optics.
3
TCET-747
Next Generation Networks
This hybrid course is a cross between an independent study and a seminar course. It provides MSTET students the opportunity to research and report on near term Next Generation Networks (NGN). The course consists of professor provided discussion on NGN followed by each student researching NGN types. Basically, a case study approach is utilized. Immediately after completing the research and written paper regarding one’s selected topic/case, each student will read each others and then present theirs to all other students in the class. As a result, every student will not only benefit from their own research of topics/cases but also be informed of other NGN by other students. Students should already have some understanding of how to perform research and must possess at least adequate writing skills.
3
TCET-790
Thesis
The MSTET graduate thesis is a document that describes and presents the results of scholarly research in the field of telecommunications. The results of a MSTET graduate thesis provide new knowledge, processes, software, or other assets that advance the state of the art of telecommunications, even in a modest way. Department permission is required.
6
 
Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
33

Telecommunications engineering technology (project option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
TCET-710
Principles of Telecommunication
The course provides the student with a solid understanding of local access and backbone network, architecture, equipment and technology related to the Public Switched Telephone (PSTN), Cable (MSO), Access and Converged/IP networks. Passive Optical Networking and Hybrid Fiber Coax technology is also covered.
3
TCET-750
Wireless Infrastructure and Policy
The fundamental principles of and U.S. regulatory requirements for wireless mobile and fixed radio frequency communication systems are studied in this course. At the end of this course, students will understand the radio frequency mobile wireless environment, the common wireless systems, and the regulatory aspects related to deployment of the wireless infrastructure.
3
GRCS-701
Research Methods
This is an introductory graduate-level survey course on research design/methods and analysis. The course provides a broad overview of the process and practices of research in applied contexts. Content includes principles and techniques of research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis including the nature of evidence, types of research, defining research questions, sampling techniques, data collection, data analysis, issues concerning human subjects and research ethics, and challenges associated with conducting research in real-world contexts. The analysis component of the course provides an understanding of statistical methodology used to collect and interpret data found in research as well as how to read and interpret data collection instruments.
3
TCET-740
Fiber Optic Telecommunications Technology 
This course presents the basic technologies of fiber-optic telecommunications systems including optical fiber, light sources and modulators, photodiodes and receivers, optical amplifiers, and passive components such as dispersion compensators, optical multiplexers and demultiplexers, and couplers. Fundamental concepts as well as state-of-the-art advances in these technologies will be covered.
2
TCET-741
Fiber Optic Telecommunications Technology Lab
This course provides extensive hands-on experience with basic technologies of fiber-optic telecommunications systems including optical fiber, light sources, and photodiodes, and key diagnosics such as optical time-domain reflectometers and optical spectrum analyzers. Students will measure the fiber impairements of dispersion and attenuation, and train in laser safety, fiber connector inspection, and fusion splicing.(MSTET accepted student or permission of instructor)
1
TCET-720
Telecommunications Concepts
The course provides the student with a solid understanding of Digital and Time Division Multiplexing and Modulation schemes used in the transmission of information in a variety of networks, both packet and circuit switched. Traffic engineering and Quality of Service concepts are covered as well as a number of network protocols and signaling platforms such as MPLS and SIP.
3
TCET-760
Network Planning and Design
This course teaches the art and science of metropolitan and wide area network design for both modern delay (data) networks and traditional blocking (voice) networks; the greatest emphasis is on modern delay networks. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are used as the student progresses through the network analysis, architecture and network design processes. An advanced WAN Fiber Optic design tool, such as OPNET Transport Planner is utilized in a required graduate project. The following are typical types of projects: Write an RFP, design an extensive metropolitan and wide area network using the latest technologies, design an extensive fiber optic network using a design tool like OPNET Transport Planner. Note: Since some students may not yet have taken a fiber course, the OPNET project stresses the use of the tool rather than the specifics of fiber optics.
3
TCET-747
Next Generation Networks
This hybrid course is a cross between an independent study and a seminar course. It provides MSTET students the opportunity to research and report on near term Next Generation Networks (NGN). The course consists of professor provided discussion on NGN followed by each student researching NGN types. Basically, a case study approach is utilized. Immediately after completing the research and written paper regarding one’s selected topic/case, each student will read each others and then present theirs to all other students in the class. As a result, every student will not only benefit from their own research of topics/cases but also be informed of other NGN by other students. Students should already have some understanding of how to perform research and must possess at least adequate writing skills.
3
TCET-797
Graduate Project
The MSTET graduate project describes and presents the results of scholarly research in the field of telecommunications. The results of a MSTET graduate project provide new knowledge, processes, software, or other assets that advance the state of the art of telecommunications or organize or implement existing knowledge in a unique and useful way. Department permission is required.
3
 
Elective
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
33

Telecommunications engineering technology (comprehensive exam option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
TCET-710
Principles of Telecommunication
The course provides the student with a solid understanding of local access and backbone network, architecture, equipment and technology related to the Public Switched Telephone (PSTN), Cable (MSO), Access and Converged/IP networks. Passive Optical Networking and Hybrid Fiber Coax technology is also covered.
3
TCET-750
Wireless Infrastructure and Policy
The fundamental principles of and U.S. regulatory requirements for wireless mobile and fixed radio frequency communication systems are studied in this course. At the end of this course, students will understand the radio frequency mobile wireless environment, the common wireless systems, and the regulatory aspects related to deployment of the wireless infrastructure.
3
GRCS-701
Research Methods
This is an introductory graduate-level survey course on research design/methods and analysis. The course provides a broad overview of the process and practices of research in applied contexts. Content includes principles and techniques of research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis including the nature of evidence, types of research, defining research questions, sampling techniques, data collection, data analysis, issues concerning human subjects and research ethics, and challenges associated with conducting research in real-world contexts. The analysis component of the course provides an understanding of statistical methodology used to collect and interpret data found in research as well as how to read and interpret data collection instruments.
3
TCET-740
Fiber Optic Telecommunications Technology
This course presents the basic technologies of fiber-optic telecommunications systems including optical fiber, light sources and modulators, photodiodes and receivers, optical amplifiers, and passive components such as dispersion compensators, optical multiplexers and demultiplexers, and couplers. Fundamental concepts as well as state-of-the-art advances in these technologies will be covered.
2
TCET-741
Fiber Optic Telecommunications Technology Lab
This course provides extensive hands-on experience with basic technologies of fiber-optic telecommunications systems including optical fiber, light sources, and photodiodes, and key diagnosics such as optical time-domain reflectometers and optical spectrum analyzers. Students will measure the fiber impairements of dispersion and attenuation, and train in laser safety, fiber connector inspection, and fusion splicing.(MSTET accepted student or permission of instructor)
1
TCET-720
Telecommunications Concepts
The course provides the student with a solid understanding of Digital and Time Division Multiplexing and Modulation schemes used in the transmission of information in a variety of networks, both packet and circuit switched. Traffic engineering and Quality of Service concepts are covered as well as a number of network protocols and signaling platforms such as MPLS and SIP.
3
TCET-760
Network Planning and Design
This course teaches the art and science of metropolitan and wide area network design for both modern delay (data) networks and traditional blocking (voice) networks; the greatest emphasis is on modern delay networks. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are used as the student progresses through the network analysis, architecture and network design processes. An advanced WAN Fiber Optic design tool, such as OPNET Transport Planner is utilized in a required graduate project. The following are typical types of projects: Write an RFP, design an extensive metropolitan and wide area network using the latest technologies, design an extensive fiber optic network using a design tool like OPNET Transport Planner. Note: Since some students may not yet have taken a fiber course, the OPNET project stresses the use of the tool rather than the specifics of fiber optics.
3
TCET-747
Next Generation Networks
This hybrid course is a cross between an independent study and a seminar course. It provides MSTET students the opportunity to research and report on near term Next Generation Networks (NGN). The course consists of professor provided discussion on NGN followed by each student researching NGN types. Basically, a case study approach is utilized. Immediately after completing the research and written paper regarding one’s selected topic/case, each student will read each others and then present theirs to all other students in the class. As a result, every student will not only benefit from their own research of topics/cases but also be informed of other NGN by other students. Students should already have some understanding of how to perform research and must possess at least adequate writing skills.
3
TCET-795
Comprehensive Exam
0
 
Electives
12
Total Semester Credit Hours
33

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in telecommunications engineering technology, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college in engineering technology, engineering, or a related area.
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.
  • Submit two professional letters of recommendation.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 88 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.
  • Applicants with a lower TOEFL score may be admitted conditionally and may be required to take a prescribed program in English and a reduced program course load.
  • International applicants from universities outside the United States must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  • While GRE scores are not required for applicants submitting transcripts from American universities, they are recommended for those whose undergraduate grade point average is below 3.0.

 

Learn about admissions and financial aid 

Additional Info

Transfer credit

A limited number of credit hours may be transferred from an accredited institution. Please consult the department chair for more information.

Prerequisite courses

Students may be required to take additional prerequisite courses depending on their background and the concentration they select. The graduate director may approve the waiver of courses in the prerequisite group from graduation requirements, depending on a student's academic and employment background.

Programming skills requirement

Students are required to have sufficient programing knowledge and skills to assure successful completion of course work. During orientation students will complete a programming qualification assessment. Students who do not take the exam or who do not earn a satisfactory grade will be required to take (TCET-601) as a bridge course to make up any deficiencies in their knowledge of programming. This bridge course does not count towards degree completion.

Other approved electives

Students may take three credit hours of elective course work from other graduate programs subject to the approval of the graduate program director. Students often choose courses from Saunders College of Business, B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, or Kate Gleason College of Engineering. The number of elective credits depends upon the student's choice of a thesis, project, or comprehensive exam.

Research and cooperative education

Students have the opportunity to apply for research projects or a cooperative education experience. While not a requirement, these opportunities increase the value of the program and the marketability of its graduates.