School of Information

Overview

In the modern world, technology has woven itself into the fabric of society, binding people and information closer together than ever before. While this new digital era brings with it exciting innovations, it also brings a host of new, unexplored problems. In the School of Information (iSchool), our focus is on utilizing technology to solve real world, human-centered problems. With a combination of diverse courses, state-of-the-art equipment, and a team of knowledgeable and imaginative faculty, the iSchool gives students the tools they need to ensure a lifetime of success. We shape the future and improve the world through creativity and innovation.

95%

Job placement rate

$80k

Average salary with one of our degrees (Glassdoor)

36th

Rank among top 50 computing colleges (Business Insider)

Latest News

  • June 30, 2020

    Matt Huenerfauth.

    Matt Huenerfauth named director of iSchool in GCCIS

    Matt Huenerfauth, a professor and expert in computing accessibility research, has been named director of RIT’s iSchool (School of Information). Huenerfauth takes the helm Aug. 1 from Stephen Zilora, who is stepping down after eight years of leadership.

  • May 6, 2020

    student Peter Yeung.

    RIT graduate Peter Yeung found perfect fit within university’s deaf community

    Eight years ago, as a high school junior, Peter Yeung participated in NTID's Explore Your Future, a program that introduces deaf and hard-of-hearing high schoolers to career opportunities. Today, Yeung is an RIT/NTID graduate who has completed three degrees and has started his career as a user experience architect with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va.

Undergraduate Programs

Home to the college’s Bachelor of Science degrees in computing and information technologies, human-centered computing, and web and mobile computing, the iSchool comprises the “full stack” computing knowledge that prepares professionals working on both the front- and back-end of the user experience.

An information technology degree where you'll implement complex computing systems and become well versed in their management.

Learn More about Computing and Information Technologies BS 

With its roots in computing, psychology, and design, this human computer interaction degree examines how people use technology and the ways in which computing systems can be more intuitive.

Learn More about Human-Centered Computing BS 

Creating an impactful app begins with solid code and good design, but understanding user expectations are the cornerstone of that process.

Learn More about Web and Mobile Computing BS 

Graduate Programs

The Master of Science in information sciences and technologies provides an opportunity for in-depth study to prepare for today’s high-demand computing careers. Big data is not just high transaction volumes; it is also data in various formats, with high velocity change, and increasing complexity and information delivery must be immediate and on demand.

Demand is high for health informaticists–those professionals who are well versed in applying computing and information technology solutions to the management of health care information and patient data. This health informatics masters will give you the knowledge and experience you need to succeed in this evolving field.

Learn More about Health Informatics MS 

In the human-computer interaction master's degree, you'll study how people interact with websites, computer systems, and software, enabling you to create intuitive interfaces that improve how we interact with and use emerging technologies.

Learn More about Human-Computer Interaction MS 

In this information science master's degree, dive deeper into the study of how information is understood and applied as you work to solve the unexplored problems that are challenging the computing industry.

Learn More about Information Sciences and Technologies MS 

Develop an expertise in interactive multimedia design as you enhance the communication and digital media experience.

Learn More about Web Development Adv. Cert. 

Minors and Immersions

The minor is a cohesive set of courses that elevates students from a foundational level to advanced knowledge of database systems and the database development process. Students learn the basics of data modeling, the relational model, normalization, and Structured Query Language (SQL). Students also learn the skills needed to effectively capture requirements, compose data models that accurately reflect those requirements, develop programs that establish lines of communication with back-end databases, build and manage large databases, and learn methods for designing and developing data warehouses.

Learn More about Database Design and Development Minor 

As the world grows in complexity and interconnectedness, new challenges arise in visually representing, reasoning, and making sense of spatially-oriented problems and data. The geographic information systems immersion allows students to study geographic problem solving and scientific inquiry from an interdisciplinary perspective of interactive, digital mapping tools and related digital data problem solving technologies. Students are introduced to geographic mapping concepts and theory, digital cartography, geographic problem solving with geospatial and related computer tools, geospatial technology ethics and application of GIS to global problems such as natural disasters.

Learn More about Geographic Information Systems Immersion 

The geographic information systems (GIS) minor provides students with experience in the concepts, technology, and applications related to computer-based mapping, spatial databases, and geographic analysis and problem solving. The minor features two tracks: a GIS development track for students interested in GIS software development, and a GIS analysis track for students interested in utilizing GIS as a strong methodological base within their major of study. Required courses provide core GIS foundations applicable to a variety of multidisciplinary elective courses students can choose from to match their research, post-graduate, or career interests.

Learn More about Geographic Information Systems Minor 

The minor in mobile design and development provides non-computing majors with a firm foundation in designing applications for mobile devices. There is an explosion in the types and amount of mobile devices and this minor is designed to provide students with the ability to design and implement cross-platform applications.

Learn More about Mobile Design and Development Minor 

The minor in mobile development provides students enrolled in computing degree programs with experience designing and creating compelling native applications for mobile devices. Smartphones are outselling desktop computers. New mobile devices of varying sizes, types, and uses are being created everyday for both businesses and personal use and contexts. Developers are needed to create applications for these needs that perform well on the major mobile platforms.

Learn More about Mobile Development Minor 

This minor provides computing students with a firm foundation in networking and/or systems administration. Computer networks and the systems attached to these networks have become ubiquitous. Therefore, knowledge of how computer networks function, their administration, and the administration of the systems attached to them can be of value to every computing professional since their work is impacted in some way by computer networks and computer systems. Students may choose between two tracks: networking or system administration.

Learn More about Networking and Systems Administration Minor 

Computing has become a tool that is used to solve problems in virtually every discipline. Members of society must have a basic understanding of computing in order to be productive. This immersion introduces students to the central ideas of computing, instilling the ideas and practices of computational thinking, and inviting students to understand how computing affects and changes their world. Students will develop an understanding of computational content, develop computational thinking skills, learn basic programming skills, and be exposed to the effects that computing has on society and culture.

Learn More about Principles of Computing Immersion 

The minor in web design and development is for non-computing majors and students outside the computing field who wish to learn more than just the basics of web usage. The minor features courses in web images, video, communication, development, and integration technologies. Students learn how to design and build websites, and create and manipulate digital images and video for the web. Students develop a broad range of skills and the understanding necessary to design and build a web presence.

Learn More about Web Design and Development Minor 

This minor provides students with a firm foundation in web development. The web has become a global, essential, and ubiquitous information delivery medium. Hence, knowledge of how the web works and how to effectively develop dynamic websites adds considerable value to computing majors. This minor provides foundational skills in web development, starting with simple sites, moving through dynamic client-side and server-side functionality, and culminating in web-based systems that create and access various information services.

Learn More about Web Development Minor 

Student Resources

Current Students

Download your course schedule diagram, complete with pre-requisites.

CIT
HCC
WMC

Please refer to our Co-op Guide!

Tutors / Lab Information

The Tutoring lab, located in GOL-2670, is a wonderful resource for iSchool students. Students struggling with Java, Database, mobile or Web projects will find useful assistance provided by the iSchool tutors.

The lab is staffed with graduate students who are experts in their tutoring areas. The iSchool tutors are a resource - all students should feel free to ask them for help!

Lab Hours and TA Schedule.

Each semester has an enrollment period in which students use the Student Information System (SIS) to choose classes to take the following semester. Enrollment for spring courses typically happens in November, and enrollment for fall courses in April. Students are assigned a specific enrollment window during the enrollment period; this window is the only time (besides add/drop week) that students can enroll in courses. Check SIS for your personal enrollment window.

Using Your Shopping Cart

The shopping cart is designed to help students manage their course selections for the following term. It allows you to plan your schedule in advance, and makes registering for courses quicker and easier. Please note that placing a class in your shopping cart does not mean you are enrolled in that class, nor does it guarantee you a seat in that class. It is simply a tool for planning purposes.

Shopping carts become available a few weeks before the enrollment period, allowing you plenty of time to talk to your advisor and plan your courses. They open at the same time for all students, regardless of credit hours completed or if a student has an advising hold on their account.

We highly recommend students utilize their shopping cart. It can alert you ahead of time to things like time conflicts, advising holds, and other issues.

Add/Drop Week

The first week of each RIT semester is 'Add/Drop Week,' which allows students to tweak their schedules, adding and dropping courses without penalty. During Add/Drop week, iSchool academic advisors hold special walk-in hours for students to help them finalize their schedules. Specific walk-in hours are posted in the iSchool weekly newsletter (Rich Text), on iSchool social media, and are displayed in the iSchool main office in GOL-2100.

The easiest way to drop a class during Add/Drop week is to use the 'drop' function in SIS. Full instructions on how to drop a class in SIS can be found online.

Students may also drop classes in-person via an advising walk-in, or at the RIT Office of the Registrar. Remember, dropping a course during Add/Drop week leaves no record on your academic transcript.

Withdrawing From a Course

After the Add/Drop week ends, dropping a course results in a "drop with penalty," AKA "withdrawing" from a course. You can withdraw from a course on SIS the same way you drop a course, but withdrawing will result in a 'W' penalty grade appearing on your academic transcript. If you are considering withdrawing from a class, we strongly encourage you to talk to your professor or academic advisor first. A withdrawal may also affect any financial aid you are receiving, so take that into account as well.

Course Waitlists and Swapping

Sometimes courses you want to take may be full before your enrollment window opens. This can happen with both required courses and electives. If this happens, you can join the waitlist for that course, which is also done via SIS. During the enrollment period, The iSchool is constantly monitoring course enrollment and waitlist numbers, and we'll do everything we can to make sure students get into the courses they need.

That being said, waitlists do not guarantee enrollment, so we advise students to plan for backup courses if some of their first picks don't work out. This is especially true if the course you're waitlisted on is not offered by the iSchool. We cannot override SIS and "push" our students into full classes that are offered by another department.

Another option is setting up a course swap, which means that if you enroll in your second choice course and then a seat opens up in your first choice, you can "swap" into that first choice course, effectively dropping your second choice without penalty. Course swaps are also done via SIS; for specific instructions, refer to the official RIT documentation.

Auditing Courses

Auditing a course means that a student may enroll in a course, but will not receive a grade or credit upon completion of the material. Students may choose to audit courses for various reasons, usually for academic exploration purposes or self-enrichment. At RIT, wellness classes make up the majority of audited courses. However, departments may allow students to audit an academic course on a case by case basis. Audits for non-wellness classes will need to be approved by the instructor using the Add/Drop Audit form, available on the Office of the Registrar's Website. Please note that audits cannot be officially processed until the first week of the academic term. If you wish to audit a course you've already taken, you must see your advisor before you enroll in the course.

Academic Advisors

All iSchool students are assigned a professional academic advisor, specific to their major. Academic advisors guide students through their chosen program's curriculum, helping them develop their academic plan. They also help students by interpreting institutional policies, referring students to other resources on campus and discussing issues of concern regarding student's academic progress. Frequent student-advisor contact is a proven factor in student success. Ultimately, students are responsible for making their own decisions based on the information and advice their advisor offers.

To make an appointment with your academic advisor, call the iSchool Student Services Office at 585-475-2700, or stop by the office in-person at Golisano Hall, room 2100. The office is open Monday-Friday, 8:30am - 4:30pm. Due to our advising team having very full schedules, same-day appointments are not permitted. Please plan ahead!

Who Is My Academic Advisor Advisor?

Jennifer Frantz (jsfrla@rit.edu): Undergraduate Degrees

Melody Klein (mfkiao@rit.edu): Undergraduate Degrees

Jill Persson (jmpics@rit.edu): Graduate students

Enrollment Helpful Hints (.pdf)

Faculty Advisors

While faculty advisors are not formally assigned, we encourage students to talk with their professors about careers or research in their field of expertise. Many of our full-time faculty have extensive experience working in industry, while others are engaged in research projects (and they're always looking for student assistance). Check out the "People" and "Research" sections of this website to get a better understanding of what each faculty member specializes in, and swing by their office hours for a chat!

Changing Your Major

If you think you want to switch to a different major, either within IST or to another department, please review the "Change of Program Students" section of this website.

Academic Alerts, Probation, and Suspension

Academic alert emails are sent from your instructor when they feel you are doing poorly in their course. This email is a friendly warning that you may get into academic trouble - like receiving a low final grade or outright failing the course - if you do not act soon. You can respond to academic alerts by meeting with your professor to learn what you can do to improve in the course. All iSchool faculty want students to succeed in their classes, but they can't help you if you don't talk to them first. Additionally, you may want to meet with your academic advisor. RIT also offers many resources for students struggling academically, and your academic advisor can help you explore those resources.

Students that are unable to rectify their poor academic performance can be placed on academic probation or face suspension from RIT. Please read RIT's official policy about academic probation/suspension, and contact your academic advisor with any specific questions.

The mission of the iSchool Student Ambassadors is to act as a student knowledge base for all things iSchool. Using their leadership and interpersonal skills, ambassadors establish relationships with prospective students and their families, current students, and the larger RIT community. Through these relationships, ambassadors will educate their audience about iSchool programs, curriculum, and facilities.
Student Ambassadors

Pictured from left to right: Joseph Agnelli, Justin Namba, Lauren Johnson

Overview

The iSchool is always looking to add more student ambassadors to its ranks, and is actively recruiting throughout the Spring and Fall semesters. Please review the following information regarding the program, and feel free to apply online if it sounds like the Student Ambassador program is right for you!

Criteria:

  • Full time IST student in good conduct standing
  • Minimum GPA of 2.5. 
  • Complete the online application and attend an in-person interview
  • Be outgoing, personable, and enthusiastic 

    Duties:

    The core responsibility of a student ambassador is to positively represent the iSchool department at various functions throughout the academic year. iSchool ambassadors are more than just tour guides. They're leaders that are trusted to impart the mission, vision, and values of the iSchool to students and the community. Specific instances may include:

    • Assisting in planning and staffing iSchool Open Houses

    • Participating in student panels for visiting prospective students and their families

    • Giving tours of and answering questions about department facilities for individuals, families, and groups including:

      • Prospective students (both freshmen and transfer)

      • Industry guests

      • High school or middle school students

    • Assisting in hosting information sessions at their former local high school (optional if relevant)

    • Suggest and help organize iSchool student community building activities

    • Attend annual Industrial Advisory Board meetings

    • Attend accreditation reviews

    • Act as a source of imput and feedback about iSchool initiatives and events

    • General leadership in the iSchool student community

     

    Expectations

    Student ambassadors are chosen in part for their enthusiasm, and we expect that enthusiasm when volunteering for iSchool events. We understand life can be hectic and we don’t expect you at every event, but you must attend a minimum of one department function per semester. Failure to do so will result in your dismissal from the student ambassadors program. We encourage you to volunteer for as many events as you are able to however. We depend on the support of our ambassadors to make our iSchool functions a success! 

    If you are on co-op during your tenure as an ambassador, the above requirement is waived until you return to RIT. Of course, if you want to attend an event as an ambassador while on co-op, we will welcome your participation.

    Student ambassadors are chosen in part for their enthusiasm, and that enthusiasm is expected when our ambassadors volunteer for iSchool events. Ambassadors are required to attend a minimum of one department function per semester.* Ambassadors are encouraged to volunteer for as many events as they are able to however. The iSchool depends on the support of its ambassadors to make iSchool functions a success!

    *If a student leaves for co-op during their tenure as an ambassador, the above requirement is waived until their return to RIT. Of course, if a student wants to attend an event as an ambassador while on co-op, iSchool welcomes their participation.

    Perks

    • Official iSchool T-shirt
    • Resume enhancement via leadership and volunteer experience
    • Letter of recommendation from iSchool Student Experience Coordinator (if requested)
    • Opportunity to establish relationships and work with faculty and staff
    • Opportunity to give input on future iSchool events, and feedback on past ones
    • Opportunity to establish personal and professional contacts outside RIT

    Interested students are encouraged to apply via our Google Forms

    For any additional information regarding the Student Ambassador program, please contact the iSchool Student Experience Coordinator, Kevin Stiner, at Kevin.Stiner@rit.edu

    Current Ambassadors

    Graduate Student Ambassadors:

    Bharath Raigari

    Bharath Raigari

    Year and Program: Networking Security and Systems Administration
    Email: br2728@rit.edu
    Areas of interest: Application Security, DevOps/ Cloud Computing
    Fun fact: If I have to change my profession, I would love to do Organic Farming

    Undergraduate Student Ambassadors:

    Regina Bass

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Terence Budu-Biney

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Adam Butera

    Year and Program: Computing and Information Technologies
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Anna Jacobsen

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Nuzhat Minhaz

    Year and Program: Computing and Information Technologies
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    John Mule'

    Year and Program: Computing and Information Technologies
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Lindsey Olson

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Aaron Putterman

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Marcus Risch

    Year and Program: Human-Centered Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Jesenia Roberts

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Nicholas "Tic" Toth

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    Bakari Wilkins

    Year and Program: Web and Mobile Computing
    Email:
    Areas of interest: 
    Fun fact: 

    The iSchool offers 2 unique study abroad opportunities for undergraduate students via international partnerships with RIT satellite campuses in Dubrovnik, Croatia and Dubai, UAE. Studying abroad doesn't mean putting your degree on hold; the curriculums are exactly the same abroad as they are in Rochester. The WMC program is mirrored in Dubrovnik, with the CIT program being taught in Dubai.

    While these two opportunities are exclusive to our department, we encourage students to explore the wealth of other study abroad experiences offered by RIT.

    Dubrovnik, Croatia

    Dubrovnik is the most southern city in Croatia and is a prominent tourist destination on the Adriatic Sea along the Dalmatian Coast. (You may recognize the city as King`s Landing from the HBO series Game of Thrones). Students attend Rochester Institute of Technology Croatia, and carry a minimum of 15 credit hours in both Web and Mobile Computing and Liberal Arts courses. 

    Watch a student film on their experience studying in Dubrovnik.

    Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE)

    Students study in the heart of Dubai Silicon Oasis, a technology park with over 800 international companies. Travel to Dubai and experience the man-made palm islands, shop in the world's largest mall, ski indoors year-round, and travel through the desert in a 4-wheel drive vehicle, horseback or camel. Students attend RIT Dubai, and carry a minimum of 15 credit hours in both Computing and Information Technology and Liberal Arts.

    Student Testimonials

    Amanda Barton, Graduated IT student

    I studied abroad at RIT Croatia, the Dubrovnik campus, in the spring semester of my second year (2014). Honestly, the study abroad experience itself is fairly indescribable. I had the chance to meet new people, eat tons of delicious food, participate in cultural events, and experience things I never could have imagined. Trying to articulate what that means to me is incredibly difficult. I learned a lot about myself that I never would have if I hadn't seized the opportunity to go abroad. I highly recommend that anyone who wants to travel should definitely take advantage of the chance to study abroad.

    Zachary Kutik, Graduated NSA student

    Studying abroad was one of the best decisions I ever made in my life, the second being choosing Croatia as my destination. It was such a beautiful contrast to Rochester. Everyone was very kind and welcoming; one of my Croatian friend's families practically adopted me for my stay there, and I still keep in touch with them today!

    The spring commencement ceremony typically happens during the third week of May. Every student that wants to graduate at that time must apply to graduate before April 15. Applying for graduation sets in motion a process that ensures you have met all requirements to graduate. To apply:

    1. Log in to SIS.
    2. Go to student center and select 'apply for graduation' in the drop down menu.
    3. Select the earliest term in which you expect to have all requirements completed (both classes and co-ops)

    Once you have applied, you academic advisor will perform a degree audit and email you the results. The audit will let you know if you have any requirements remaining that will impede your graduation, and if you'll be able to graduate in the timeframe you expect.

    Failure to apply before the April 15 deadline has lasting consequences; talk to your academic advisor if you miss this important deadline.

    Organizational Restructure FAQ

    iSchools focus on the study of information--its collection, storage, manipulation, analysis, and use.

    Individual degree programs will not be affected in any way. The department is taking on additional, new initiatives that warrant it being reclassified as a school.

    Your degree is awarded by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences and the Rochester Institute of Technology. 

    Service courses are similar to regular program courses, but are intended to be taken by students not enrolled in that program. They are offered as a service to other students.

    Computing-for-all is an initiative to help all people, not just computer experts, be able to use computers and computing technology comfortably in their personal and professional lives. With its service courses and public outreach efforts, the iSchool is contributing to this initiative.

    At RIT, departments are headed by chairs, while schools are headed by directors. Matt Huenerfauth stepped into the iSchool Director role on August 1, 2020.

    Prospective Students

    The iSchool offers 2 unique study abroad opportunities for undergraduate students via international partnerships with RIT satellite campuses in Dubrovnik, Croatia and Dubai, UAE. Studying abroad doesn't mean putting your degree on hold; The curriculums are exactly the same abroad as they are in Rochester. The WMC program is mirrored in Dubrovnik, with the CIT program being taught in Dubai.

    While these two opportunities are exclusive to our department, we encourage students to explore the wealth of other study abroad experiences offered by RIT.

    Dubrovnik, Croatia

    Dubrovnik is the most southern city in Croatia and is a prominent tourist destination on the Adriatic Sea along the Dalmatian Coast. (You may recognize the city as King`s Landing from the HBO series Game of Thrones). Students attend Rochester Institute of Technology Croatia, and carry a minimum of 15 credit hours in both Web and Mobile Computing and Liberal Arts courses. 

    Watch a student filmon their experience studying in Dubrovnik.

    Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE)

    Students study in the heart of Dubai Silicon Oasis, a technology park with over 800 international companies. Travel to Dubai and experience the man-made palm islands, shop in the world's largest mall, ski indoors year-round, and travel through the dessert in a 4-wheel drive vehicle, horseback or camel. Students attend RIT Dubai, and carry a minimum of 15 credit hours in both Computing and Information Technology and Liberal Arts.

    Student Testimonials

    Amanda Barton, fourth-year IT student

    I studied abroad at RIT Croatia, the Dubrovnik campus, in the spring semester of my second year (2014). Honestly, the study abroad experience itself is fairly indescribable. I had the chance to meet new people, eat tons of delicious food, participate in cultural events, and experience things I never could have imagined. Trying to articulate what that means to me is incredibly difficult. I learned a lot about myself that I never would have if I hadn't seized the opportunity to go abroad. I highly recommend that anyone who wants to travel should definitely take advantage of the chance to study abroad.

    Zachary Kutik, fourth-year NSA student

    Studying abroad was one of the best decisions I ever made in my life, the second being choosing Croatia as my destination. It was such a beautiful contrast to Rochester. Everyone was very kind and welcoming; one of my Croatian friend's families practically adopted me for my stay there, and I still keep in touch with them today!

    How to Succeed in the iSchool

    Like most other university departments, students need to meet certain basic requirements to do well in the iSchool: attend class, get to know your professors (visiting their office hours is a great way to do this) and meet your classmates. There are a few iSchool-specific topics however:

    Buying or Bringing a Computer to RIT

    The majority of iSchool students bring their own computer with them to RIT. While it is entirely possible to excell in iSchool classes and eventually graduate without owning your own computer, we find that most students enjoy the convenience of being able to take their work outside the labs. We also allow the use of personal computers in our classes, if students wish to do so. In fact, many of our professors prefer using open source software to teach, and our students like the convenience of being able to download the software and continue their work at home.

    That being said, there are certain scenarios (in-class exams, for example) that require use of iSchool lab computers. If you are thinking about purchasing a computer to bring to RIT, our campus Information Technology Services Office has recommended support and purchasing guidelines.

    Prior knowledge of programming languages

    Many of our students enter our degree programs with some prior knowledge of code, whether it was from a high school class, online course, or other resource. This prior knowledge is great, but not required. Our introductory classes are designed to teach concepts from the ground up, meaning that a student with zero prior knowledge of class concepts is just as likely to succeed as a student that has experience with the material.

    If you do however have access to computing courses through your high school, we encourage you to take them! You can also learn on your own through various free online resources; we like Code Academy. For specific topics, we recommend learning the programming language Java.

    Getting involved in iSchool

    You'll often hear that to make the most of your college experience, you need to "get involved" on campus. This axiom holds true in the iSchool, and there are several ways to get involved in the department. We have 3 student-run clubs that cater to different interests:

    • Localhost is for students interested in web and mobile application design & development, and user experience design.
    • NextHop is geared towards students that have an interest in computer networking and systems administration.
    • SIGCHI at RIT is the local student chapter of an international organization that focuses on human computer interaction and how we interface with technology.

    Labs

    The iSchool has 11 computing labs dedicated to student use. All labs feature industry standard equipment, and are open 7 days a week for student use. Students have access to both OSX and Windows, and all of the lab computers share the same software image, meaning you can pick up your work where you left off, no matter which lab you're in.

    Tutors

    Tutoring services are also available in our labs. Our tutors are more senior students, and are hired to help students struggling with introductory concepts or classes.

    Transferring Course Credit

    All course credit, whether it is from another college, AP, IB, or otherwise, must be submitted to the RIT Office of Admissions. More information about transferring credit can be found online.

    Visit Us!

    We are happy to accommodate you and your family, should you wish to visit our department. To make the most of your visit, we please ask that you first call ahead to the RIT Admissions Office (585-475-6736) and then to our office (585-475-2700). This will allow us to coordinate with the admissions office and prepare for your arrival. You can find more info about visiting RIT online.

    During your visit to our department, you'll meet with one of our professional academic advisors, who will outline the curriculum and answer any questions you may have. You'll also have the opportunity to take a tour of our department facilities, led by one of our current student ambassadors. We can also arrange for you to meet other members of staff or faculty, including our department chair, academic coordinators, and degree program curriculum leads. Just make sure to let us know who you want to meet before you visit! 

    Interested?

    If you think one of our programs is right for you, apply via the RIT Admissions website.

    Welcome to the School of Information (iSchool) orientation website! We are very excited for you to join the iSchool community. Throughout this site you will find an explanation of advising resources available to students in our degree programs, details regarding incoming credit, and departmental contact information. Use them as a guide to help you transition into life in the iSchool.

    View orientation details

    Change of Program Students

    Application Process

    If you wish to change your major to one outside of the iSchool, your first step is to schedule an appointment with an advisor from the major you'd like to enter. They will be the best resource to help you decide if the major is right for you. They will also alert you to any additional materials you'll need to prepare in order to switch majors into their department. (For example, the iSchool requires a written statement from all change of program applicants).

    Next, meet with your current academic advisor in iSchool, and they will complete a Change of Program form with you. The form is then sent (along with your academic file) to your new department. Your new department will then review all materials and make the final decision. You will be notified of this decision via email from your new department.

    Switching majors into one of our degrees

    Spring Semester Information Sessions

    Attend one of our meetings

    • Wednesday, September 30 from 12:00-1:00 p.m. (ET) on Zoom
    • Friday, October 23 from 1:30-2:30 p.m. (ET) on Zoom

    Please email Kevin.Stiner@rit.edu for the Zoom link.

    To request an interpreter, please go through Access Services.

    Application Process

    Meet with your academic advisor in your current (home) department to complete a Change of Program Registrar's form. You will need to submit a 1-2 page written statement that answers the following questions:

    • Why are you applying to your chosen iSchool major: CIT, HCC, WMC?
    • What are you academic strengths and weaknesses?
    • What areas of computing are you passionate about?
    • What are you future goals and/or career interests?
    • Why do you believe this major is the right fit for your future goals?

    Your completed application & statement should be emailed by December 8 to Melissa.Hanna@rit.edu.

    Deadlines, Dates & More

    • Spring Semester (2205) Change of Program Deadline: Tuesday, December 8
    • Application will be reviewed after fall semester (2201) final grades are posted.
    • Students will receive an email of our decision after the new year.
    • iSchool course restrictions lift two weeks after enrollment begins - please place yourself on the wait list by setting up a SWAP
    • The iSchool reserves the right to deny a change of program application based on the above criteria, academic standing, or students' demonstrated ability to complete program requirements.
    • Recommended cumulative & term GPA: 2.5 + in courses relevant to iSchool

    Suggested Courses

    • ISTE 120 Computational Problem Solving in the Information Domain (all majors)
    • ISTE 140 Web and Mobile I (all majors)
    • MATH 131 Discrete Math (WMC and CIT majors)
    • STAT 145 Intro to Statistics I (HCC and CIT majors)
    • PSYC 101 Intro to Psychology (HCC major)

    Daniel Bogaard; iSchool Undergraduate Program Director
    Jennifer Frantz; Academic Advisor, All Majors
    Melody Klein; Academic Advisor, All Majors