Project Fast Forward

41

Partnerships

Dual-credit partnerships with high schools in 25 states across the country 

14

Courses

RIT/NTID dual-credit courses offered

1.0k+

Students

Deaf and hard-of-hearing high school students who have completed RIT/NTID dual-credit courses

100+

Trained

Teachers, counselors, and administrators who are trained in administering RIT/NTID dual-credit courses

Deaf and hard-of-hearing students can get a jump start on their college journey.

Project Fast Forward helps qualified deaf and hard-of-hearing high school students across the country get a jump start on a college degree by offering dual-credit college courses in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) areas. The ultimate goal of the program is to help deaf and hard-of-hearing students transition from high school to college and earn a college degree in a STEM field.

The dual-credit courses are offered by Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The courses are taught at the students’ high schools, by their own teachers, during regular school hours. Courses are offered in schools for the deaf as well as public high schools with programs for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. The credits earned by students can be used toward a degree at RIT/NTID or any other college across the country that accepts the credit.

Students who successfully pass the dual-credit course will receive a $500 scholarship to use toward their tuition at RIT/NTID if they enroll at the university to pursue their college degree. The scholarship will be renewable every year.

Teachers, guidance counselors, and school administrators who are involved with Project Fast Forward receive:

  • Professional development training.
  • Access to free workshops on STEM careers and employment opportunities available to deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals.
  • Additional training for teachers in mainstream classrooms to improve existing teaching practices so deaf and hard-of-hearing students have better access to learning.

 

A Dual Credit Course at The Learning Center for the Deaf

Student Information

  • Eases your transition from high school to college.
  • Learn how to study for college courses and develop the skills needed to be successful in college such as:
    • Following a syllabus
    • Meeting course requirements
    • Organizing and managing time effectively
    • Using self-discipline
    • Improving and applying high-level thinking skills
    • Following college course policies and procedures
  • Gain the confidence you need to succeed in college.
  • Explore STEM careers.
  • Earn free college credit while you are still in high school.
  • Save money and receive a $500 scholarship when you enroll at RIT/NTID.*

*Scholarships are renewed every year.

There is no cost associated with enrolling in an RIT/NTID dual-credit course and receiving college credit.

Dual-credit courses are offered through an agreement between your high school and RIT/NTID. To enroll in a dual-credit course, you need to satisfy both the college and high school requirements and show that you are ready for college-level coursework. 

Dual-credit courses are established by an agreement between the high school and the college. Enrollment in a dual-credit course requires that you satisfy both the college and high school eligibility requirements. After you complete the course you receive a final grade for the course and the college credit earned from the college. In contrast, Advanced Placement (AP) is a national standardized program where you must only meet high school eligibility requirements to enroll in an AP course and take an optional exam to earn AP credit. 

Teacher Information

  • Your students learn how to study for college-level courses.
  • Your students prove they can do college-level work.
  • Your students develop the confidence they need to succeed in college.
  • Your students have the opportunity to explore STEM careers.
  • Your students earn free college credit while they are still in high school.
  • Your students save money and receive a $500 scholarship when they enroll at RIT/NTID. Scholarships are renewed every year.

Have your school administrator contact Project Fast Forward Director Brittany Comegna or call 585-542-4720 to express your school’s interest in establishing a dual-credit partnership.

RIT/NTID covers all expenses associated with professional development training for high school teachers, administrators, and guidance counselors as well as the training materials. Deaf and hard-of-hearing high school students can enroll in an RIT/NTID dual-credit course and receive college credit at no cost other than a small fee for ordering an RIT transcript.

Deaf and hard-of-hearing students who demonstrate a readiness for college-level coursework are eligible to enroll in an RIT/NTID dual-credit course. This includes:

  • Satisfying high school requirements such as:
    • GPA
    • Grades in previous subject-area courses
    • Test scores
    • Course/credit hour limitations
  • Being recommended by a high school teacher or guidance counselor

Each summer teachers attend workshops at RIT for three-five days, depending on how much training they need to teach dual-credit courses at their high school. All of the expenses (travel to RIT, food, hotel, entertainment, etc.) for the professional development are covered by the Project Fast Forward program. Participants who complete the Project Fast Forward training are eligible for 1.5 hours of CEU credit. Training for this year will be held June 24-June 28, 2020.

Before arriving at RIT, teachers are sent a survey asking what topics they would need to learn to be able to teach each dual-credit course, and professional development workshops are then developed specifically for each teacher. Course materials for each RIT/NTID dual-credit course also are made available to teachers, so they can review the materials before and during the training.

The summer professional development training includes:

  • Technical training on course content and teaching methodologies, so teachers are able to teach the dual-credit courses at their own institutions.
  • Information on Project Fast Forward; dual-credit course agreements; and individual course content, objectives, and requirements.

Professional development for high school guidance counselors participating in Project Fast Forward is offered each summer at RIT. Counselors attend for two days. All of the expenses (travel to RIT, food, hotel, entertainment, etc.) for the professional development are covered by the Project Fast Forward program. The summer professional development for counselors includes:

  • Information on Project Fast Forward; dual-credit course agreements; and individual course content, objectives, and requirements.
  • Dialogues about post-secondary transition planning resources and strategies to support students throughout their transition.

Courses Offered

Course Number NACC-130   Credits 3

This course provides students with information and resources needed to understand the creation and implementation of a budget, use of credit and borrowing money responsibly, financial rights and ways to safeguard their money, and factors used to determine their readiness to buy a home or make other major purchases. Information on financial institutions such as banks, credit unions, and savings and loan organizations will also be covered. This course will provide students with basic financial literacy so they can develop sound financial management of their personal income as well as an understanding of the economic events that can influence their financial well being and society as a whole.

Goals 

  • To develop technical reading and writing skills as well as problem solving, critical thinking and decision-making skills related to understanding various financial aspects of everyday life
  • To develop short-term and long-term financial goals required for a personal budget plan.
  • To develop an understanding of banking services and credit usage
  • To develop an appreciation of sound personal financial management
  • To develop an understanding of various decision-making processes that applies to the roles of citizens, workers, and consumers

Topics 

  • Personal Decision Making
  • Paychecks
  • Earning and Reporting Income
  • Banking and Financial Institutions
  • Saving and Investing
  • Higher Education: Investment and Expenditures
  • Managing Finances and Budgeting
  • Buying Goods and Services
  • Protection Against Risk
  • Using Credit
  • Retirement Planning
  • Estate Planning

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:
Assessment Method
  1. To develop technical reading and writing skills as well as problem solving, critical thinking and decision-making skills related to understanding various financial aspects of everyday life
    • Analyze all aspects of a typical paycheck, including but not limited to voluntary and involuntary deductions/taxes
    • Develop and evaluate a budgeting/spending/savings plan and identify needs and wants
    • Identify various forms of income and analyze tax strategies and factors that affect income

Instructor Observation, Homework Assignments, Exams, and In-Class Activities

  1. To develop short-term and long-term financial goals required for a personal budget plan
    • Develop personal financial goals and personal financial statements
    • Analyze differences between buying house versus renting an apartment and buying an automobile versus leasing an automobile

Instructor Observation, Homework Assignments, Exams, and In-Class Activities

  1. To develop an understanding of banking services and credit usage
    • Evaluate services provided by financial deposit institutions
    • Analyze factors that affect the choice of credit, the cost of credit, and the legal aspects of using credit

Homework Assignments and In-Class Activities

  1. To develop an appreciation of sound personal financial management
    • Analyze choices available to consumers for protection against risk/financial loss
    • Evaluate differences between money markets, stocks, bonds, and mutual funds

Instructor Observation, Homework Assignments, Quizzes, Exams, and In-Class Activities

  1. To develop an understanding of various decision-making processes that applies to the roles of citizens, workers, and consumers
    • Explore insurance options available for protection insuring one’s health, vehicle, life, liability, property, disability, and long-term care
    • Analyze the differences between wills, living wills, power of attorney and trusts
    • Analyze differences between 401(k), 403(b), 457(b) IRA and Roth IRA retirement plans

Assignments, Quizzes, Exams, and In-Class Activities


Required Textbooks

  • PFIN, 7th Edition, Randall Billingsley, Lawrence Gitman, and Michael Joehnk. Cengage, 2020
  • The Infographic Guide to Personal Finance: A Visual Reference for Everything You Need to Know, Michael Cagan and Elisabeth Lariviere. Simon & Schuster, Inc., 2017
    ISBN: 9781507204665


Other Required Materials

  • Computer Lab with connections to online services and media projection equipment
  • Microsoft Office software (i.e., microsoft.com/money)
  • Intuit software (i.e., Quicken and TurboTax)
  • World Wide Web/Internet personal finance sites (i.e., money.cnn.com, kiplinger.com, mymoney.gov, and mint.com) 

Course Number NACA-172  Credits 3

This course introduces students to web page and small-scale website development. Through hands-on laboratory experiences, students will learn the fundamental concepts needed to construct web pages that follow appropriate coding standards as well as basic design principles to present content in an attractive and organized manner. Topics include HTML, CSS, graphical elements, website publishing, and transfer protocols.

Goals 

  • To understand what the Internet is, how browsers display web pages, and the history of the Internet
  • To develop the skills to create a basic website using valid HTML tags, CSS, graphics and links
  • To understand design principles as they relate to web page design
  • To understand how to search for, use, and manipulate a variety of digital resources, and the legal implications of their use
  • To learn how to use both Windows and UNIX operating environments for file management and application tasks
  • To develop the study skills and the independent learning skills needed to succeed in baccalaureate level courses
  • To develop the writing skills needed to present text-based information on a web page in a clear, concise and organized manner
  • To develop the reading skills needed to understand technical materials such as books, journals, and manuals related to web development

Topics

  • Introduction to the Internet
    • Internet browsers and interoperability
    • Internet addressing
    • History of the WWW and Internet
  • HyperText Markup Language 5 (HTML 5)
  • HTML tags and styles
    • Basic HTML Structure
    • Basic HTML Formatting
    • Images
    • Locating digital resources
    • Copyright and IP issues
    • Image creation and manipulation
    • Links
    • Tables
    • Multimedia
  • Cascading Style Sheets 3
    • Defining selectors
    • Formatting with Styles
    • Layout with Styles
  • W3C Validation
  • Search and metadata
  • Accessibility
    • Alt and Title attributes
    • Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
  • Internet Protocols
    • Hypertext Transfer Protocol
    • File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
    • Secure FTP
  • Basic Web Page Design
    • Content Creation/Organization
    • User experience and usability
    • Navigation design
  • UNIX Operating System
    • File and directory management
    • Access permissions

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome: At the completion of this course, students will be able to: Assessment Method
1. Utilize basic Internet protocols and tools including FTP Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
2. Identify key figures and events in the development of the Internet and the World Wide Web Projects, Quizzes & Tests
3. Create web pages using valid HTML 5 and CSS 3 including graphics and links Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
4. Use graphic tools to optimize images for web pages Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
5. Upload pages to a web server Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
6. Demonstrate knowledge of graphic and information design as well as web design principles to create valid web pages Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
7. Demonstrate knowledge of digital imaging concepts such as file formats, resolution, color models, and compression methods Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
8. Perform a search to gather information from the Internet Class exercises & Projects
9. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of copyright laws and citing digital sources Projects
10. Perform basic file and directory management tasks in the UNIX environment such as creating, deleting, and renaming items, and changing access permissions Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
11. Demonstrate the ability to create valid web pages without the use of external resources Quizzes & Tests
12. Research and present content on a web page in a clear, concise, and organized manger Class exercises & Projects
13. Demonstrate the ability to read web references to independently and correctly use new features of HTML Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests
14. Use CSS 3 to support responsive web pages Class exercises, Projects, Quizzes, & Tests


Required Textbook

  • Basics of Web Design: HTML 5 & CSS, 5th Edition, Terry Felke-Morris. Harper College, 2020
    ISBN: 9780135225486


Additional Notes/Details 

  • Computers
    • Keyboard and mouse
    • Internet connection
    • Text editor (for instance: Freeware)
    • Image editor (for instance: Photoshop or Gimp)
  • Server space

Course Number NACT-120   Credits 3

This course is an introduction to using general-purpose software tools. The tools to be covered include word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software as well as an email client. Students will do hands-on work in each application.

Goals 

  • To master the basic features of an integrated software package or suite that includes email, word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software. 
  • To learn how to select the right application for a task.
  • To learn how to combine the features of several applications in order to perform a task.
  • To develop the computer terminology and technical reading and writing skills to effectively use office applications.

Topics 

  1. Windows Operating System
    1. Exploring the Basics
    2. Working with Files
  2. Microsoft Word
    1. Creating a Document
    2. Editing and Formatting a Document
    3. Creating a Multiple-Page Report
    4. Desktop Publishing a Newsletter
  3. Microsoft Excel
    1. Using Excel to Manage Financial Data
    2. Working with Formulas and Functions
    3. Developing a Professional-Looking Worksheet
    4. Working with Charts and Graphics
  4. Microsoft Access
    1. Introduction to Microsoft Access
    2. Creating and Maintaing a Database
    3. Querying a Database
    4. Creating Forms and Reports
  5. Microsoft PowerPoint
    1. Creating a PowerPoint Presentation
    2. Appling and Modifying Text and Graphic Objects
  6. Integrating Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

  1. Use a word processor to develop documents using specified text formatting, column formatting, graphics, header/footers and data fields such as current dates and page numbers.

Assignment and exams

  1. Use spreadsheet software to format text, automate calculations using functions and formulas, create charts based on selected data, and use advanced features such as themes and conditional formatting.

Assignments and exams

  1. Create and maintain simple databases including creating tables and generating simple queries, forms and reports.

Assignments and exams

  1. Design multimedia presentation material using sample slide layouts and color themes. Print the presentation material as slides, notes or handouts.

Assignments and exams

  1. Utilize features in the email system beyond the simple read, send and delete capabilities such as searching, filtering, and assigning email to folders and using the calendar functions.

Assignments and exams

  1. Identify the type of documentation needed and the appropriate software to accomplish a task.

Assignments and exams

  1. Use features from different applications within a productivity suite to create an integrated document such as a presentation utilizing data from a database, a chart from a spreadsheet software, and text from a word processing application.

Assignments and exams

  1. Identify and describe in writing the computer terminology used in common productivity suites.

Assignments and exams

  1. Use provided or student-selected texts and online multimedia to read and further develop skills to enhance documentation.

Assignments and exams

  1. Write well-formed documentation and utilize available proofreading features.

Assignments and exams


Required Textbook

  • Technology for Success and Illustrated Series Microsoft® Office 365 & Office 2019, 1st Edition, David Beskeen, Jennifer Campbell, Mark Ciampa, Barbara Clemens, Carol Cram, Jennifer Duffy, Steven Freund, Lisa Friedrichsen, Mark Frydenberg, Ralph Hooper, Lisa Ruffolo, and Lynn Wermers. Cengage, 2020
    ISBN: 9780357025680


Additional Notes/Details 

  • Microsoft Office Suite (most recent version) is required for this course

Course Number NACT-150   Credits 3

This course introduces the fundamental hardware concepts of Windows-based computers. The skills required to install, upgrade and maintain computers are presented. The course provides students with methodologies and hands-on activities related to the configuration, diagnosis, repair, upgrade, and preventive maintenance of computer hardware, input/output devices and data communications. Topics include the basic functions and use of test equipment, logical troubleshooting of internal system conflicts and faulty peripherals, and electrical safety.

Goals 

  • To learn how the CPU has developed and the future direction of CPU development
  • To understand the functions and settings of all the components in a Windows-based PC and how they interact
  • To develop the skills to be able to assemble a PC from individual components
  • To learn how to install and configure a Windows operating system
  • To develop the skills to be able to perform common PC upgrades
  • To develop the critical thinking, logic, and technical skills needed to troubleshoot and repair PCs
  • To learn how to obtain technical information on hardware and/or configurations via on-line and digital resources
  • To develop the skills to be able to set up and troubleshoot peripherals
  • To learn computer-related preventive maintenance, safety, and environmental issues
  • To develop the reading skills needed to understand technical materials such as college textbooks, professional journals, and manuals provided by the computers manufacturer
  • To develop the technical writing skills needed to document PC problems and how they were resolved

Topics

  1. Hardware components
  2. Assemble a PC from components
  3. Binary and Hexadecimal Number Systems
  4. System Resources
    1. IRQ
    2. DMA Channels
    3. I/O Address
    4. Memory Address
  5. Boot up configuration
  6. Electricity and Power Supplies
  7. Preventive Maintenance & Care of PC
    1. Protecting your computer against electricity static discharge
    2. Electromagnetic interference
    3. Surge Protection and UPS
  8. The System Board
    1. Configure and upgrade a PC
  9. Supporting I/O devices
    1. Installing and Configuring Peripheral Devices
    2. Using Various Ports and Expansion Slots
  10. Installing Storage Devices
  11. System Upgrading and Optimizing
    1. Motherboard, boot up system and memory
    2. CPU, processor speed, and compatibility
    3. Power supply output capacity
    4. Bus types and characteristics
  12. Notebooks, mobile devices
  13. Diagnosing and Troubleshooting
  14. Disposing and recycling of computer component and peripherals

Learning Outcomes 

Outcomes At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

  1. Describe the history of CPU development and future direction of CPU development.

Assignments and exams

  1. Identify all the components in a computer, and explain the function of each, and how each component interacts with the motherboard and/or other components

Lab activities and exams

  1. Convert decimal numbers to binary and hexadecimal

Lab activities and exams

  1. Assemble a computer from individual components.

Lab activities and exams

  1. Install and configure a windows OS: Upgrade memory, divers and BIOS

Lab activities and exams

  1. Troubleshoot and repair hardware and OS issues

Lab activities and exams

  1. Obtain technical information on hardware and/or configurations using the Web or other digital resources.

Lab activities, assignments, and exams

  1. Set up peripherals and use software and hardware tools to troubleshoot and/or repair peripherals

Lab activities and exams

  1. Follow preventive maintenance and safety procedures for computers

Lab activities and exams

  1. Follow correct procedures for recycling and disposing of computer hardware and peripherals

Lab activities and exams

  1. Read and use technical material as a reference for troubleshooting, repairing, maintaining or upgrading a PC

Lab activities and exams

  1. Create lab reports that document the troubleshooting procedures and how the problems were resolved

Lab activities and exams


Required Textbook

  • CompTIA A+ Guide to IT Technical Support, Jean Andrews, 10th Edition. Cengage, 2020
    ISBN: 9780357108291

Course Number NACT-230   Credits 3

Please note: Introduction to Programming is on hold for the 2020-2021 school year.

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and terminology of computer programming. Emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving skills in designing and writing simple computer programs. The course covers such topics as developing flowcharts, algorithms and pseudocode, and introduces students to variables, operators, conditional statements, looping statements, data structures, error-handling and debugging, and user interface design. The course assumes no programming background. (Pre-requisites: NACT-170 Introduction to Web Development, NMTH-120 or above).

Goals 

  • To understand programming concepts and terminology.
  • To develop the critical thinking and problem solving skills needed to write well structured, syntactically correct programs that solve general application problems.
  • To learn to appropriately use the components of a programming language, including variables and data types, relational and logical operators, branching, and looping, and data structures.
  • To develop the skills to read, trace, and understand simple code.
  • To develop the skills to write, test, and debug code to solve a simple problem.
  • To successfully use many features of a programming language compiler to create, debug, and execute programs.
  • To enhance students' reading and writing abilities.

Topics 

1.0 Introduction
1.1 Overview of Computer Programming Languages
2.0 The Software Development Process
2.1 Software Development Life Cycle
2.2 Algorithms, flowcharts, pseudocode
3.0 Variables, Data, Input, and Output
3.1 Variables, data types, declarations
4.0 Operators and Expressions
4.1 Arithmetic, relational, logical operators
4.2 Operator Precedence
5.0 Decisions
5.1 If Statements
5.2 If-Else Statements
5.3 Switch Statements
6.0 Repetitions
6.1 For Loops
6.2 While Loops (Pretest Loops)
6.3 Do-While Loops (Posttest Loops)
7.0 Arrays
7.1 Use arrays for storage and retrieval of data in a program
8.0 Introduction to Developing a User Interface
8.1 How to design user interface for software applications
8.2 Best practices for user interface design
8.3 Building a user interface.

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome: At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

  1. Understand what software development is and what software developers do

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Describe the purposes of programming and software development.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Define an integrated development environment.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Describe the software development process, its purpose, critical steps, and where programming fits in that process.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Identify a problem that requires a programmed solution. (algorithms)

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Describe problem-solving techniques.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Demonstrate the use of variables.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Describe the various data types you can use to declare variables.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Demonstrate the use of operators including arithmetic, relational, and logical operators.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Demonstrate the use of If, If-Else, and Switch statements.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Demonstrate the use of For, While  and Do-While Loops.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Identify and troubleshoot syntax, runtime and logic errors.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Create and use arrays.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Trace program logic to identify logic errors and/or program output.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Write computer programs to solve problems using features such as input and output statements, conditional statements, looping statements, and arrays.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Employ various techniques for testing and debugging computer programs to ensure accurate results.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Define an integrated development environment.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Identify the features of a good user interface design for software applications.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in using the programming language in developing creative solutions to solving problems.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Illustrate how pseudocode and flowcharts are used in creating computer programs.

Assignments, Class Exercises, Exams

  1. Write clear program documentation including the purpose of the program and comments on the function of program logic.

Assignments and Class Exercises

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of programming concepts and programming design through reading.

Assignments and Class Exercises

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of programming concepts and programming design in writing.

Assignments and Class Exercises

Course Number NAIS-130  Credits 3

This course introduces students to the skills needed for the successful production and manipulation of raster and vector images using image creation and production software. Students will work in bitmap and vector applications, producing and editing with the tools and techniques offered by the software programs such as selection techniques, basic layer controls, digital masking, image correction and enhancement. Additional topics will include the relevance of image size, resolution and file format specifications when working with raster and vector images. Comprehension and correct usage of terminology and concepts are emphasized.

Goals 

  • Develop reading, writing, analytical thinking, and problem solving skills related to
    bitmap and vector images and basic digital image manipulation.
  • Learn how to use raster and vector programs to create and manipulate images.
  • Foster ability to make fundamental image manipulation decisions.
  • Understand how to design and evaluate digital images.
  • Enhance knowledge needed for saving and managing graphic files in various file
    formats for screen, digital printer, or press output.
  • Understand how to compress, store and retrieve digital images.
  • Learn to make appropriate decisions regarding file formats and file management.
  • Prepare for the job application and interview, resume writing, and portfolio building processes.

Topics 

  • Definition, purpose, benefits, differences, between bitmap and vector graphics 
  • Basic tools, menus and controls needed for bitmap and image creation and editing 
  • Working with selections 
  • Layers in bitmap graphics 
  • Correcting and enhancing digital photos 
  • Masks and channels 
  • Type 
  • Vector tools in a bitmap application 
  • Selecting and aligning tools 
  • Creating shapes combining and editing 
  • Transforming objects 
  • Drawing with vector tools 
  • Color 
  • Working with type 
  • Working with Layers in vector graphics
  • Working with perspective drawing 
  • Blending and adjusting color and shapes
  • Working with Brushes 
  • Applying and editing effects
  • Appearance attributes and graphic styles 
  • Vector graphics and other applications

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome: At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

  1. Compare and use raster and vector software applications as appropriate for design and job specifications.

Successful completion of projects per specified criteria; tests and exams

  1. Identify and describe characteristics of raster and vector images.

Successful completion of projects per specified criteria; tests and exams

  1. Use Adobe Photoshop to create, save, and edit raster images.

Successful completion of projects per specified criteria; tests and exams

  1. Use Adobe Illustrator to create, save, and edit vector images.

Successful completion of projects per specified criteria; tests and exams

  1. Explain and discuss issues of ethics, copyright, and professional responsibilities in the selection, use, and/or modification of graphic images.

Critiques, class discussions, tests and exams.

  1. Identify and demonstrate the use of correct file formats for Web and print.

Successful completion of projects per specified criteria; tests and exams

  1. Describe primary skills learned in this course; select and archive projects which may be appropriate for inclusion in a portfolio.

Successful completion of projects per specified criteria; tests and exams


Required Textbooks

  • Adobe Illustrator Classroom in a Book, 1st Edition, Brian Wood. Adobe Press, 2020
    ISBN: 9780136412670
  • Adobe Photoshop Classroom in a Book, 1st Edition, Andrew Faulkner and Conrad Chavez. Adobe Press, 2020
    ISBN: 978-0136447993


Additional Notes/Details

  • Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator (most recent versions) are required for this course

Course Number NAIS-150   Credits 3

Students will use page layout (desktop publishing) applications to design and produce pages and documents to given specifications. Skill development will include importing and placing text and graphic files, the application of style sheets, templates, snippets, libraries, and color specifications. The application of design and typographic principles, industry terminology, measurement systems, font management, and file management are also covered.

Goals 

  • Develop reading, writing, analytical thinking, and problem solving related to desktop publishing.
  • Improve technical skills in using software applications to manipulate and efficiently utilize the elements of a document, including typography, design, graphics and layout.
  • Prepare for a job application and interview, including resume writing and portfolio building processes.

Topics 

1.0 Job Specifications
          1.1 Measurement         
          1.2 Fonts   
2.0 Graphics
          2.1 Bitmapped vs. vector files and formats
          2.2 Element creation (rules, tints, etc.)
          2.3 Image manipulation
3.0 Electronic Page Layout
          3.1 File setup
          3.2 File naming and identification
          3.3 Document layout
              3.3.1 Pagination
              3.3.2 Master pages
              3.3.3 Templates
              3.3.4 Libraries
              3.3.5 Tables
          3.4 Placing text
               3.4.1 Text flow
               3.4.2 Style sheets
          3.5 Placing graphics
               3.5.1 Graphic manipulation
               3.5.2 Linking
          3.6 Integrating text and graphics
          3.7 Color: Color systems and techniques
          3.8 File saving
          3.9 Use of Help menu, on-line help, and documentation
4.0 Document Output
5.0 File Management
6.0 Design Fundamentals
          6.1 Design principles: balance, emphasis, rhythm, unity, figure/ground
          6.2 Design elements: line, shape, value, color, texture, type
          6.3 Formats and grids

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

  1. Analyze project specifications and determine most appropriate page layout strategies for document construction.

Projects and performance tests

  1. Define application preferences and workspace arrangement to best fit document requirements and personal work style.

Projects and performance tests

  1. Design and produce well crafted and visually appealing layouts integrating typography and graphic effects.

Projects and performance tests

  1. Accurately use and apply correct technical vocabulary related to desktop publishing procedures and software applications.

Written and performance tests

  1. Identify the purpose of, and demonstrate proficiency with, the graphic and drawing tools in desktop publishing applications.

Written and performance tests

  1. Define document colors, styles, and master elements for efficient productivity in desktop publishing procedures.

Projects and performance tests

  1. Apply industry-standard procedures for document preparation for final print output requirements and archiving.

Projects and performance tests

  1. Describe primary skills learned in this course; select and archive projects which may be appropriate for inclusion in a portfolio.

Written and Performance tests


Required Textbook

  • Adobe InDesign Classroom in a Book, 1st Edition, Tina DeJarld and Kelly Kordes Anton. Adobe Press, 2020
    ISBN: 9780136502678


Additional Notes/Details 

  • Adobe InDesign (most recent version) is required for this course

Course Number NCAD-150   Credits 3

The objective of this course is to introduce students to engineering graphics as a means of communication in the technical fields of architecture, engineering and construction (A/E/C). The course is laboratory oriented and provides the student with basic skills to create professional 2D drawings with this comprehensive first course in the use of AutoCAD software for mechanical, architectural and civil drawings. The course assumes no prior knowledge of engineering drawing or CAD.

Goals 

  • Develop reading, writing and critical thinking skills related to engineering graphics
  • Understand proper computer usage and lab safety procedures
  • Learn file management techniques and understand various file formats for CAD programs
  • Know how to set up CAD drawing parameters for different disciplines including mechanical, architecture and civil
  • Develop basic CAD skills to create, modify and manipulate 2D technical drawings
  • Understand different procedures for printing and plotting CAD drawings
  • Develop basic skills in free hand lettering and technical sketching

Topics 

  • Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting
  • Introduction to the AutoCAD interface
  • Navigating the AutoCAD environment
  • Understanding drawing in ‘real world’ scale and the Cartesian coordinate system
  • Basic 2D object construction tools
  • 2D geometric construction and editing tools
  • Object properties and organization
  • Basic dimensioning and notes
  • Templates, layouts and plotting
  • Freehand lettering and technical sketching
  • Incorporating multimedia resources such as videos, sound, and scripts
  • Creating and processing forms using a CGI

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome: At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

  1. Understand the role of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) in the engineering and construction fields

Exams, Homework

  1. Demonstrate proper file management strategies

Lab Exercises

  1. Create an AutoCAD template with appropriate settings for different engineering disciplines

Exams, Homework, Lab Exercises

  1. Create 2D graphics using standard AutoCAD drafting tools

Exams, Homework, Lab Exercises

  1. Input precise coordinates using the Cartesian coordinate system format

Exams, Homework, Lab Exercises

  1. Use properties and modify tools to manipulate 2D graphics

Exams, Homework, Lab Exercises

  1. Create sheet layouts and produce hard copy prints and plots

Exams, Homework, Lab Exercises

  1. Produce quality freehand lettering and basic technical sketches

Homework, Lab Exercises


Required Textbook

  • Introduction to AutoCAD 2020: A Modern Perspective, 1st Edition, Paul F. Richard. Pearson, 2020
    ISBN: 9780135576878


Additional Notes/Details 

  • AutoCAD software is required for this course

Course Number NCIM-101   Credits 3

Students develop the basic skills necessary to read and interpret fundamental engineering drawings of details, subassemblies and assemblies.

Goals 

  • Develop the skills necessary to read, analyze and interpret standard engineering drawings
  • Learn to apply these skills in problem-solving situations
  • Develop the skills necessary to communicate technical information with co-workers
  • Develop the ability to apply math and engineering graphics skills to solve technical graphic problems
  • Develop the ability to use basic shop math to perform all the calculations necessary to interpret basic engineering drawings

Topics 

  • Common fractions, decimal fractions and percentage
  • Engineering drawing nomenclature and symbols
  • Dimensioning Systems
  • Single-view and detail drawings
  • Sketching views from objects and isometric drawings
  • Tolerances
  • Arcs and circles
  • Projections
  • Multi-view drawings
  • Angles and angular dimensions
  • Machined features
  • Surface roughness
  • Sectional Views
  • Threaded hole specifications
  • Metric Drawings
  • Introduction to Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome: At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

  1. Describe the meaning of every line in each view and identify all symbols

Exams, Homework, Classwork

  1. Describe the shape and location of each feature of an object in all views of a machine drawing.

Exams, Homework, Classwork

  1. Identify, using correct vocabulary, the tools, and materials and machining processes as stated on a blueprint.

Exams, Homework, Classwork

  1. Perform all calculations required in the interpretation of a blueprint to produce a finished machine part.

Exams, Homework, Classwork

  1. Demonstrate appropriate work habits and willingness to cooperate with co-workers.

Observation

  1. Verify that given prints conform to established industrial tolerance standards.

Exams, Homework, Classwork


Required Textbook

  • Interpreting Engineering Drawings, 8th Edition, Ted Branoff, Cecil Jensen, and Jay Helsel. Cengage, 2016
    ISBN: 9781133693598

Course Number NCIM-214   Credits 3

Students develop engineering skills in engineering graphics and solid modeling. Students will use computer-aided drafting (CAD) as a tool to generate 2D graphics and 3D solid models. The course is laboratory oriented and provides the student with basic skills in spatial visualization, freehand sketching, parametric solid modeling, and creation of engineering drawings which meet industrial drafting standards.

Goals 

  • Understand how to specify and control functional requirements through an engineering design process
  • Develop the conceptual and visualization skills required to create and read engineering documentation
  • Develop free hand sketching skills to communicate functional requirements of design concepts
  • Create detailed engineering drawings in a standard industrial format
  • Communicate engineering related solutions using engineering graphics
  • Develop reading skills needed to read and understand technical materials related to computer aided drafting applications
  • Develop writing skills needed to communicate technical information on the job

Topics 

  • Design cycle
  • Freehand sketching and visualization
  • Creation of 2D drawings
  • 3D solid model
  • Industry drafting standards
  • Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T)
  • Assembly construction
  • Rapid Prototype

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:
Assessment Method
1. Apply sketching skills of parts and assembly, concepts, and engineering Graphics Lab Activities
2. Apply visualization skills such as 2D to 3D conversion and perspective Views Lab Activities
3. Utilize basic measuring equipment and formulate GD&T specifications of a selected part Lab Activities
4. Create parts and assemblies using a 3D parametric solid modeling computer program Lab Activities
5. Generate detailed orthographic and axonometric drawings including proper dimensions, tolerance of parts and notations in a standard industrial format Lab Activities
6. Calculate size limits based on class of fit Lab Activities
7. Formulate and organize a design concept Projects
8. Demonstrate the ability to create quality solid models, engineering drawings and prototypes in a timely fashion Projects
9. Create an assembly drawing of parts Projects & Final Exam
10. Demonstrate ability to effectively make presentations Presentations & Final Exam


Required Textbook

  • Introduction to Solid Modeling Using SOLIDWORKS 2020, 16th Edition, William Howard and Joseph Musto. McGraw Hill, 2021
    ISBN: 9781260254136


Additional Notes/Details 

  • Maximum of 10 computers which includes an installation of 2D/3D related software such as AutoCAD, SolidWorks and MasterCAM

Course Number NMTH-140   Credits 3

This project-based course is intended for students interested in the exploration of mathematical thinking and procedures. It includes applications to real world situations and uses problem solving skills. Topics include number sense, consumer mathematics, introduction to statistics, basic geometry, number representation, and units of measurement including conversion in English and metric systems. 

Goals 

  • To provide and enhance a foundation in mathematical thinking and problem solving
  • To explore the interface between language (English and ASL), mathematics and symbol systems
  • To actively explore appropriate use of current technology in conjunction with concepts developed in the course
  • To develop reading, writing and critical thinking skills related to concepts of mathematics/statistics content
  • To apply and practice math skills that will be vital to success in other courses and which are important in the areas of business and the social sciences

Topics 

  • Number Sense
    • Applications of Mental Arithmetic
    • Applications of Estimation
    • Review Exponents
    • Relational Operations
    • Scientific Notation
  • Consumer Mathematics
    • Review of Percents, Decimals, and Fractions
    • Solving Percent Problems
    • Applications
      • Sales Tax, Sales Price, Income Tax
      • Installment Loans
      • Annuities
      • Simple and Compound Interest
      • Review Percent of Increase and Decrease
  • Introduction to Statistics
    • Population vs. Sampling
    • Graphical Presentation of Qualitative and Quantitative Data
    • Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode
    • Concept of Measures of Dispersion: Range, Standard Deviation
    • Concept of Normal Distribution
    • Scatterplot and its Correlation
    • Concept of a Best-Fit Line
  • Units of Measurement & Conversion in the English and Metric Systems
    • Length
    • Area
    • Volume and Capacity
    • Weight and Mass
    • Temperature in Fahrenheit and Celsius Scales
    • Pixel Dimension, Resolution & Image Aspect Ratio
  • Geometry
    • Perimeter & Circumference
    • Area
    • Volume
  • Number Representation
    • Early and Modern Numeration Systems
      • Simple Grouping Systems: Egyptian
      • Multiplicative Grouping Systems: Chinese
      • Positional Systems: Hindu-Arabic & Roman
    • Base Number Systems
      • Base 10
      • Binary System (Base 2)
      • Octal System (Base 3)
      • Hexadecimal System (Base 16)
      • Base Conversion
    • Operations in Base Number Systems
  • Supplemental Project Activities
    • Strategies for Learning Mathematics
      • Getting Extra Help
      • Reading and Using On-Line Materials
      • Writing Mathematically
      • Preparing for Project Management
      • Working and Communicating with other Students
      • Summarizing Learning Outcomes
    • Use of Calculator & Spreadsheet
    • Technical Signs and Mathematics Vocabulary
    • ASL Signs used in Mathematics
    • How the Mathematical Concepts Relate to the Signs

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:
Assessment Method
1. Demonstrate the use of mental arithmetic and estimation Project & Test
2. Convert very small/large number into scientific notation and vice versa Project & Test
3. Solve written problems involving percent of increase or decrease, expressing the answer in written English Project & Test
4. Solve applied problems involving sales tax, discounts and income tax Project & Test
5. Compute simple/compound interest and future value Project & Test
6. Determine the value of an annuity and regular payments needed to achieve financial goal Project
7. Compute the periodic payment needed to meet a goal, for example: a mortgage/purchasing a new car Project
8. Find the interest, the balance due, and the minimum monthly payment for the credit card loans Project & Test
9. Describe the difference between a population and a sample Project & Test
10. Organize and present data visually Project & Spreadsheet
11. Determine and interpret the mean, median, mode for a data set Project & Spreadsheet
12. Determine and interpret the range and standard deviation for a data set Project & Spreadsheet
13. Recognize characteristics of normal distribution and understand the 68-95-99.7 rule Project & Test
14. Make a scatter plot for a table of data items, draw a best-fit line and interpret information given on the scatter plot Project & Spreadsheet
15. Convert measurements of length in the English/metric system Project
16. Convert between English and metric units of length Project
17. Convert units of area/volume Project
18. Convert weights in the English/metric system Project
19. Convert weights in the English/metric system Project
20. Convert weights between English and metric units Project
21. Convert temperatures between the Fahrenheit and Celsius scales Project
22. Solve applied problems involving pixel dimension, resolution and image aspect ratio Project
23. Calculate perimeters and areas of plane regions and solve applied problems Project & Test
24. Use formulas to calculate a circle’s circumference and area Project & Test
25. Compute the volumes of three-dimensional figures and solve applied problems Project & Test
26. Convert between base 10 and other bases Project
27. Convert between binary, octal, and hexadecimal Project
28. Add, subtract, multiply and divide in bases other than ten Project & Test
29. Work with numbers in the Egyptian, Roman & Chinese systems Project

 

Additional Notes/Details 

  • Course should be offered in a room with a SmartBoard and related software, and dual projectors when possible because of the extensive use of technology

Course Number NSCI-155   Credits 3

This course covers introductory science processes using biology content as a vehicle to establish an appreciation of the scientific method, critical thinking and problem solving. The basic processes of observing, collecting data, classifying, comparing, analyzing and forming hypotheses will be addressed using selected concepts in biology. 

Goals 

  • To develop reading, writing and analytical skills related to selected concepts in biology and to use those skills to develop and revise written laboratory reports
  • To enhance skills in communicating scientific ideas and processes in writing and face-to-face, using English and ASL
  • To develop students’ ability to think critically and solve problems as they relate scientific concepts to their health and development
  • To develop skills in observation, basic measurement techniques, data collection, and graphical and analytical interpretation of data

Topics 

  • The Scientific Method and Hypotheses
  • Homeostasis in the human body
    • Circulatory System
    • Respiratory System
    • Excretory System
  • Human Nutrition
    • Macromolecules
    • Digestive System
  • Human Development
    • Cells
    • Mitosis and Meiosis
    • Reproductive System
  • Human Inheritance
    • Genetics
    • Biotechnology
  • Human Disease
    • Bacteria & Viruses
    • Circulatory System Diseases
    • Respiratory System Diseases
    • Excretory System Diseases
    • Digestive System Diseases
    • Reproductive System Diseases
    • Cancer
  • Technical signs and science vocabulary
    • ASL signs used in this course
    • How the science concepts relate to the signs

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:
Assessment Method
1. Apply the process of the scientific method to formulate a hypothesis Lab work & Laboratory Reports
2. Provide examples of homeostasis within the human body Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
3. Describe the function of the following body systems: circulatory, respiratory, excretory, digestive, reproductive Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
4. Describe the structure of the heart and blood flow through it using correct anatomical terminology Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
5. Identify the flow of deoxygenated and oxygenated blood through the pulmonary and systemic circuits Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
6. Compare the structure and function of the three types of blood vessels Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
7. Discuss the dangers of high blood pressure and artery damage Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
8. Explore the role of lifestyle in cardiovascular disease Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
9. Identify and describe the major components of blood and their function Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
10. Differentiate between different blood types and explain the requirements for blood donors and recipients Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
11. Calculate max heart rate and target heart rate for a given age Lab work & Laboratory Reports
12. Identify the structures of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and their functions Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
13. Discuss how gas is exchanged through the alveoli Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
14. Describe the main disorders of the lower and the upper respiratory tracts Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
15. Explain how the nephrons of the kidney filter the blood Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
16. Discuss common excretory system disorders Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
17. Classify chemical structures of various biological macromolecules Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
18. Explain the structures, processes and functions of the organs in the digestive system Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
19. Differentiate between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes and explain how the condition arises Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
20. Explain the following nutrition disorders: obesity, bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, malnutrition Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
21. Identify organelles when presented a picture of a cell Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
22. Explain the function of cellular organelles Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
23. Identify and draw various tissue types from prepared slides Lab work & Laboratory Reports
24. Differentiate between the processes of mitosis and meiosis Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
25. Discuss common reproductive diseases and disorders Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
26. Perform analyses of Punnett squares and stated predicted ratios of phenotypes and genotypes Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams
27. Perform DNA gel electrophoresis Lab work & Laboratory Reports
28. Read plasmid maps and predict DNA fragment sizes Lab work & Laboratory Reports
29. Graph data collected from antibiotic sensitivity testing Lab work & Laboratory Reports
30. Explain the process of invasive cancer Assignments, Quizzes, & Exams


Required Textbook:

  • Campbell Essential Biology with Physiology, 6th Edition, Eric Simon, Jean Dickey, and Jane Reece. Pearson, 2019
    ISBN: 9780134763453


Additional Notes/Details 

  • Properly organized, equipped, and maintained science lab and access to computers 
  • Lab coats or aprons, goggles, gloves 
  • Electrophoresis equipment for testing DNA samples 
  • Lung model 
  • Blood pressure cuff 
  • Prepared slides of cells (histology) 
  • Urinalysis kit (Ward’s) 
  • Materials for dissections (kidneys, hearts, fetal pigs; dissection tray, dissection tools) 
  • Stopwatches/timers 
  • Petri dishes, TSA agar, antibiotic disc

Course Number NSCI-153   Credits 3

This course covers introductory science processes using content of environmental studies as a vehicle to establish an appreciation of the scientific method, critical thinking and problem solving. The basic processes of observing, collecting data, classifying, comparing, analyzing and forming hypotheses will be addressed using the concepts of environmental studies.

Goals 

  • To develop reading, writing and analytical skills related to the environmental studies content and to use those skills to develop and revise written laboratory reports
  • To enhance skills in communicating scientific ideas and processes in writing and face-to-face, using English and ASL
  • To develop students’ ability to think critically and solve problems as they relate scientific concepts to real world issues
  • To develop skills in observation, basic measurement techniques, data collection, and graphical and analytical interpretation of data

Topics 

  • Air Pollution
  • Vehicle Pollution
  • Fuel Economy
  • Alternative Energy Sources
  • Toxic Release Inventory
  • Water Pollution
  • Water Quality Monitoring
  • Water Quality Testing (chemical based)
  • Water Quality Testing (species based)
  • Great Lakes
  • Environmental Policy
  • Global Warming
  • Environmental Disasters
  • Biodiversity
  • Human Population
  • Overfishing
  • Technical signs and science vocabulary
  • ASL signs used in this course
  • How the science concepts relate to the signs

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Assessment Method

1.  Research and analyze which car is the best through MPG and how high and low MPG impacts the environment

Lab report

2.  Research and present various alternative energy sources by showing the pros and cons of the energy source

Presentation, Test

3. Identify trouble areas using Toxic Release Inventory reports

Lab report

4.  Use technology to collect water samples to analyze  and report findings

Lab report

5.  Research and share environmental issues regarding the Great Lakes.

Presentation, Test

6.  Discuss the importance of Biodiversity

Homework, Test

7.  Analyze the impact of human population growth on the environment.

Homework, Test

8.  Measure the impact of wind on air pollution

Lab report

9.  Measure the impact of cars on air pollution.

Lab report

10.  Measure the impact of overfishing on ecosystem and demonstrate knowledge how to reduce overfishing

Homework, Lab report, Test

11.  Demonstrate cooperative problem solving with peers

Lab activities

12.  Research multiple environmental disasters and demonstrate how the ecosystem was impacted

Presentation

 

Additional Notes/Details 

  • Properly organized, equipped, and maintained science lab and access to computers

Course Number NSCI-156   Credits 3

This course covers introductory science processes using the content of forensics as a vehicle to establish an appreciation of the scientific method, critical thinking and problem solving. The basic processes of observing, collecting data, classifying, comparing, analyzing and forming hypotheses will be addressed using the concepts of forensics.

Goals 

  • To develop reading, writing and analytical skills related to the forensics content and to use those skills to develop and revise written laboratory reports
  • To enhance skills in communicating scientific ideas and processes in writing and face-to-face, using English and ASL
  • To develop students’ ability to think critically and solve problems as they relate scientific concepts to real world issues
  • To develop skills in observation, basic measurement techniques, data collection, and graphical and analytical interpretation of data

Topics 

  • Forensic Concepts and Terms
  • Prediction and Hypothesis
  • Documenting a Crime Scene
  • Crime Scene Analysis
    • Using actual data
    • Using news articles
  • Laboratory Techniques
    • Blood
    • Hair
    • Fingerprints
    • DNA
    • Urine Analysis
  • Writing a Formal Laboratory Report
  • Technical signs and science vocabulary
    • ASL signs used in this course
    • How the science concepts relate to the signs

Learning Outcomes 

Outcome:
At the completion of this course, students will be able to:
Assessment Method
  1. Explain the basic terminology that applies to the field of forensics (evidence, alibi, motive, etc).

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Differentiate between the terms prediction and hypothesis.

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Given scenarios, determine the reason for experimentation, the hypothesis for the experiment and make predictions based on the data presented.

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Given data, use Excel to produce a graphical representation of the data.

Laboratory Reports

  1. Analyze given data and provide an explanation for the outcomes of an experiment.

Quizzes, Homework &

  1. Write a lab report with all of the required sections and necessary content.

Laboratory Report

  1. Describe the steps necessary for documenting a crime scene.

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Given a crime scene, document and record the data.

Lab work

  1. Differentiate between the different types of fingerprints.

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Given unknown fingerprints, match them with known fingerprints.

Lab work

  1. Given articles of recent crimes in the US, list the evidence that lead to the capture of the convict.

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Using anti-serum, identify blood types of unknown samples.

Lab work

  1. Identify the structures of a strand of hair and explain how hair differs between races and species. 

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Using a microscope, match unknown hair samples with known hair samples.

Lab work

  1. Explain the purpose of restriction enzymes for analyzing DNA.

Quizzes, Homework & Labs

  1. Using electrophoresis, analyze known and unknown samples of DNA.

Lab work


Additional Notes/Details

  • Properly organized, equipped, and maintained science lab and access to computers
  • Electrophoresis equipment for testing DNA samples
  • Other equipment and consumables including micropipettes, fake blood, hair samples, ink pads, etc.

Registration

Enrollment

Students must demonstrate a readiness for college-level coursework to enroll in an RIT/NTID dual-credit course. This includes:

  • Meeting high school requirements such as:
    • GPA
    • Grades in previous subject area courses
    • Test scores
    • Course/credit hour limitations
  • Being recommended by a high school teacher or guidance counselor 
  • Meeting course prerequisites

Project Fast Forward Partner High Schools

Map of NTID Project Fast Forward Partners

The following map shows all of our dual-credit partnering high schools.

NSF logo This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant numbers: 0602761, 1104229, and 1501756.