Business Administration: Accounting Bachelor of science degree

8d1425e4-9d96-452a-a24c-3f2d8309a658 | 6276410

In this dynamic accounting bachelor’s degree, you'll determine an organization’s wealth, profitability, and liquidity as you guide short- and long-term financial business decisions.


100%

Outcome Rate of RIT Graduates

$44.8K

Average First-Year Salary of RIT Graduates

#1

Undergraduate business programs in Western New York; 67th overall nationally. U.S. News & World Report, 2021

2 in 5

Earn two degrees in five years with the accelerated BS/MS accounting degree


Overview

  • Network with professionals from the Big Four and regional accounting firms when you join the Next Generation of Accountants (NGA) chapter
  • Qualify to sit for the Certified Professional Accounting (CPA) exam, with exam pass rates exceeding NY and national averages
  • An accounting-specific career fair connects accounting majors with employers in finance and banking. Network with company representatives and interview directly for open co-op and permanent employment positions
  • Connect with Saunders alumni and key professionals through the Accounting Advisory Board

Accountants are multidisciplinary professionals. They are responsible for determining an organization's overall wealth, profitability, and liquidity. Without accounting, organizations would have no foundation upon which daily and long-term business decisions could be made.

RIT’s Degree in Accounting

Our accounting bachelor’s degree covers financial and managerial accounting disciplines while introducing you to the technology needed for the profession. Leveraging the strength of our nationally ranked management information systems (MIS) program (#6, College Factual), you’ll gain the technological skills needed to design, operate, and control accounting information systems–skills that are highly sought after by employers. As one of the oldest and most respected professions in the world, a degree in accounting can lead to an exciting and rewarding career in one of the most essential lines of work in the business world.

RIT’s accounting major covers financial and managerial accounting disciplines while introducing students to technology, including accounting information systems, while gaining exposure to the liberal arts, sciences, and management. Students planning a career in public accounting may select undergraduate course work preparing them to enter RIT’s MBA-accounting program. Completion of both the accounting BS and the MBA-accounting degrees satisfies the New York state CPA education requirements (see electives). Some accounting majors may choose to tailor the program to meet diverse career opportunities in the commercial, government, and not-for-profit sectors.

Students planning to pursue an MBA-accounting degree and a career in public accounting should consult an accounting professor or accounting academic advisor.

Accounting Career Fair

RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education hosts an accounting-specific career fair that connects accounting majors with employers in finance and banking. During this day-long event, you’ll be able to network with company representatives and interview directly for open co-op and permanent employment positions.

Combined Accelerated Pathways

This program has an accelerated bachelor’s/master’s available, one of RIT's Combined Accelerated Pathways, which enables you to earn two degrees in as little as five years.

Accelerated 4+1 MBA

An accelerated 4+1 MBA option is available to students enrolled in any of RIT’s undergraduate programs. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Pathways can help you prepare for your future faster by enabling you to earn both a bachelor’s and an MBA in as little as five years of study.

Typical Job Titles

Accountant Auditor
Credit Card/Cashless Accountant Financial Specialist
Junior Accountant Senior Auditor
Tax Accountant

Cooperative Education

Cooperative education, or co-op for short, is full-time, paid work experience in your field of study. And it sets RIT graduates apart from their competitors. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries. RIT co-op is designed for your success.

Students in the accounting major are required to complete at least one block of cooperative education.

Explore salary and career information for Business Administration: Accounting BS 

Curriculum for Business Administration: Accounting BS

Business Administration: Accounting, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ACCT-110
Financial Accounting
An introduction to the way in which corporations report their financial performance to interested stakeholders such as investors and creditors. Coverage of the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ACCT-210
Management Accounting
Introduction to the use of accounting information by managers within a business. Explores the value of accounting information for the planning and controlling of operations, assessing the cost of a product/service, evaluating the performance of managers, and strategic decision making. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ECON-101
General Education – Global Perspective: Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ECON-201
General Education - Elective: Principles of Macroeconomics
Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behavior. The course begins by presenting the production possibilities model. This is followed by a discussion of basic macroeconomic concepts including inflation, unemployment, and economic growth and fluctuations. The next topic is national income accounting, which is the measurement of macroeconomic variables. The latter part of the course focuses on the development of one or more macroeconomic models, a discussion of the role of money in the macroeconomy, the aggregate supply-aggregate demand framework, and other topics the individual instructor may choose. (Prerequisites: ECON-101 or completion of one (1) 400 or 500 level ECON course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MGIS-101
Computer-based Analysis
This course provides students with hands-on experience with the analytical software tools and techniques that are used in today's businesses. Emphasis will be placed on the application of spreadsheet models for supporting management decision-making. A variety of spreadsheet-based cases in market research, financial analysis, accounting applications and other business domains will be utilized to show how to effectively analyze and solve business problems using the spreadsheet tool. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
MGIS-130
Information Systems & Technology
To be successful in our globally-networked business environment, contemporary management professionals must have a strong grounding in the principles of information and information technology. This course provides an introduction to the field of management information systems (MIS), including the tools and techniques for managing information and information technologies within organizations. We place a particular emphasis on the nature of systems, the role of information in business processes, the management of data, and the planning of MIS design projects. Lecture 3, Recitation 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MGMT-101
Business 1: Ideas and Business Planning
This is the first of a two-course sequence comprising the freshman integrated experience. In Business 1 students will be introduced to the key functional areas of business, the evaluation of new business opportunities, and the business plan process. By applying the creative process, students will conceive new business ideas that will be developed in Business 2. (Co-requisite: MGIS-101 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MGMT-102
Business 2: Business Planning and Professional Development
This course, the second course in the First-year Business Sequence, applies technology tools to create well defined and complete business plans. Students will develop websites and other marketing and process tools to take their business concept outlined in Business 1 to a final business plan for review with an outside board. (Prerequisites: MGMT-101 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STAT-145
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
STAT-146
General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Introduction to Statistics II
This course is an elementary introduction to the topics of regression and analysis of variance. The statistical software package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on business applications. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – First Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
ACCT-305
Accounting Profession
This course consists of a series of workshops designed to introduce accounting students to the skills needed to be successful in job and co-op searches and the transition into professional life and careers. Students will establish their career goals, create relevant documents such as resumes and cover letters, and develop skills needed to succeed in pursuing accounting positions or graduate school. Students will be expected to interact with business professionals, study materials related to current and emerging trends in accounting and business, and develop professional deportment. Active class participation is required. Note: Matriculated in Saunders undergraduate accounting program. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with at least 2nd year standing in ACCT-BS program. Co-requisite: ACCT-360 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
ACCT-360
Intermediate Financial Accounting I
Extensive exposure to the accounting cycle with full integration of the data flow in an accounting information system. Accounting theory developed by accounting standard-setting bodies is covered in-depth. Generally accepted accounting principles are discussed as they apply to the preparation of financial statements and the recognition and measurement of financial statement elements, primarily assets. International Financial Reporting Standards are introduced as they relate to course subject matter. (Prerequisites: ACCT-210 or NACC-206 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ACCT-445
Accounting Information Systems
This course combines information systems concepts and accounting issues. In this course, we discuss the conceptual foundations of information systems, their applications, the control and auditing of accounting information systems, and the system development process. Topics include the business process, e-business, relational database, database design, computer fraud and security, accounting cycle, system analysis and AIS development strategies. Students analyze accounting information systems topics through problem solving, group project, presentations, exams, and case studies. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
BLEG-250
General Education - Elective - Law, Business, and Society
This course provides an introductory survey of significant aspects of how select laws in the U.S. affect and are affected by society and commercial enterprises. The focus is on legal principles and societal considerations. Ethical issues in certain contexts will be discussed as well. Students will be introduced to basic legal research. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
COMM-253
General Education - Elective: Communication
An introduction to communication contexts and processes emphasizing both conceptual and practical dimensions. Participants engage in public speaking, small group problem solving and leadership, and writing exercises while acquiring theoretical background appropriate to understanding these skills. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
FINC-220
Financial Management
Basic course in financial management. Covers business organization, time value of money, valuation of securities, capital budgeting decision rules, risk-return relation, Capital Asset Pricing Model, financial ratios, global finance, and working capital management. (Prerequisites: (ECON-101 or ECON-201) and ACCT-110 and (STAT-145 or STAT-251 or CQAS-251 or MATH-251 or MATH-252 or STAT-205) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
INTB-225
General Education - Elective: Global Business Environment
Being an informed global citizen requires an understanding of the global business environment. Organizations critical to the development of the global business environment include for-profit businesses, non-profits, governmental, non-governmental, and supranational agencies. This course introduces students to the interdependent relationships between organizations and the global business environment. A holistic approach is used to examine the diverse economic, political, legal, cultural, and financial systems that influence both organizations and the global business environment. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-161
General Education - Elective: Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement Exam score greater than or equal to 45.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
4
MGMT-215
Organizational Behavior
As an introductory course in managing and leading organizations, this course provides an overview of human behavior in organizations at the individual, group, and organizational level with an emphasis on enhancing organizational effectiveness. Topics include: individual differences, work teams, motivation, communication, leadership, conflict resolution, organizational culture, and organizational change. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MKTG-230
Principles of Marketing
An introduction to the field of marketing, stressing its role in the organization and society. Emphasis is on determining customer needs and wants and how the marketer can satisfy those needs through the controllable marketing variables of product, price, promotion and distribution. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3, Recitation 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
Third Year
ACCT-365
Intermediate Financial Accounting II
In-depth consideration of generally accepted accounting principles and theory as they apply to the recognition and measurement of common liabilities and stockholders’ equity, as well as income taxes, pensions and leases. Issues related to dilutive securities, earnings per share, accounting changes, revenue recognition, and the statement of cash flows are also addressed. International Financial Reporting Standards are introduced as they relate to course subject matter. (Prerequisites: ACCT-360 or 0101-408 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ACCT-420
Personal and Small Business Taxation
A basic introductory course in federal income taxation. Emphasis is on taxation of individuals and sole proprietorships. Topics include income measurement and deductibility of personal and business expenses. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
DECS-310
Operations Management
A survey of operations and supply chain management that relates to both service- and goods- producing organizations. Topics include operations and supply chain strategies; ethical behavior; forecasting; product and service design, including innovation and sustainability; capacity and inventory management; lean operations; managing projects; quality assurance; global supply chains; and the impacts of technology. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MGMT-340
General Education – Ethical Perspective: Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
This course applies concepts of ethics to business at the macro level and at the micro level. At the macro level the course examines competing business ideologies exploring the ethical concerns of capitalism as well as the role of business in society. At the micro level the course examines the role of the manager in establishing an ethical climate with an emphasis on the development of ethical leadership in business organizations. The following topics are typically discussed: the stakeholder theory of the firm, corporate governance, marketing and advertising ethics, the rights and responsibilities of employees, product safety, ethical reasoning, business's responsibility to the environment, moving from a culture of compliance to a culture of integrity, and ethical leadership. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Open Elective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective†
3
 
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective
3
 
General Education Immersion 1, 2
6
Fourth Year
ACCT-430
Cost Accounting (WI-PR)
Intermediate-level coverage of operational budgeting and performance evaluation. Development and use of cost data for external reporting and internal planning and control. Topics include operational budgeting, performance evaluation, job costing, process costing, joint product, and by-product costing, service department cost allocation, standard costing, activity-based costing, back-flush costing, and transfer pricing. Development of relevant cost information for special purposes is also considered. (Prerequisites: ACCT-210 or NACC-206 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ACCT-490
Auditing
A study of the legal, ethical, and technical environment in which the auditor works. Current auditing theory, standards, procedures, and techniques are studied. The audit process is studied to ascertain how it leads to the development of an audit opinion. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act and internal control issues are examined. Students are also introduced to accountants’ professional responsibility. (Prerequisites: ACCT-365 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MGMT-560
Strategic Management
A capstone course drawing upon major business functions—accounting, finance, marketing, operations management, and organizational theory and how strategic managers integrate functional theories and concepts to create competitive advantage. The course provides an integrated perspective of business organizations toward the achievement of enhanced profitability and a sustainable competitive advantage. Topics include the analysis of business environments, industry attractiveness, and competitive dynamics. Students learn how to formulate and implement effective business-level, corporate-level, and global strategies using theories, cases and a simulation. (Prerequisites: MGMT-215 and MKTG-230 and FINC-220 and DECS-310 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Electives
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
124

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Students must also complete one semester of cooperative education.

† Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and lab portions to satisfy the requirement.

Accelerated Dual-Degree Programs

Today’s careers require advanced degrees grounded in real-world experience. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Pathways enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in as little as five years of study. You’ll earn two degrees while gaining the valuable, hands-on experience that comes from co-ops, internships, research, study abroad, and more. Learn how a Combined Accelerated Pathway can prepare you for your future, faster.

Business Administration: Accounting, BS degree/Accounting and Analytics, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ACCT-110
Financial Accounting
An introduction to the way in which corporations report their financial performance to interested stakeholders such as investors and creditors. Coverage of the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ACCT-210
Management Accounting
Introduction to the use of accounting information by managers within a business. Explores the value of accounting information for the planning and controlling of operations, assessing the cost of a product/service, evaluating the performance of managers, and strategic decision making. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ECON-101
General Education – Global Perspective: Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ECON-201
General Education – Elective: Principles of Macroeconomics
Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behavior. The course begins by presenting the production possibilities model. This is followed by a discussion of basic macroeconomic concepts including inflation, unemployment, and economic growth and fluctuations. The next topic is national income accounting, which is the measurement of macroeconomic variables. The latter part of the course focuses on the development of one or more macroeconomic models, a discussion of the role of money in the macroeconomy, the aggregate supply-aggregate demand framework, and other topics the individual instructor may choose. (Prerequisites: ECON-101 or completion of one (1) 400 or 500 level ECON course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MGIS-101
Computer-based Analysis
This course provides students with hands-on experience with the analytical software tools and techniques that are used in today's businesses. Emphasis will be placed on the application of spreadsheet models for supporting management decision-making. A variety of spreadsheet-based cases in market research, financial analysis, accounting applications and other business domains will be utilized to show how to effectively analyze and solve business problems using the spreadsheet tool. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
MGIS-130
Information Systems & Technology
To be successful in our globally-networked business environment, contemporary management professionals must have a strong grounding in the principles of information and information technology. This course provides an introduction to the field of management information systems (MIS), including the tools and techniques for managing information and information technologies within organizations. We place a particular emphasis on the nature of systems, the role of information in business processes, the management of data, and the planning of MIS design projects. Lecture 3, Recitation 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MGMT-101
Business 1: Ideas and Business Planning
This is the first of a two-course sequence comprising the freshman integrated experience. In Business 1 students will be introduced to the key functional areas of business, the evaluation of new business opportunities, and the business plan process. By applying the creative process, students will conceive new business ideas that will be developed in Business 2. (Co-requisite: MGIS-101 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MGMT-102
Business 2: Business Planning and Professional Development
This course, the second course in the First-year Business Sequence, applies technology tools to create well defined and complete business plans. Students will develop websites and other marketing and process tools to take their business concept outlined in Business 1 to a final business plan for review with an outside board. (Prerequisites: MGMT-101 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STAT-145
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
STAT-146
General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Introduction to Statistics II
This course is an elementary introduction to the topics of regression and analysis of variance. The statistical software package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on business applications. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – First Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
ACCT-305
Accounting Profession
This course consists of a series of workshops designed to introduce accounting students to the skills needed to be successful in job and co-op searches and the transition into professional life and careers. Students will establish their career goals, create relevant documents such as resumes and cover letters, and develop skills needed to succeed in pursuing accounting positions or graduate school. Students will be expected to interact with business professionals, study materials related to current and emerging trends in accounting and business, and develop professional deportment. Active class participation is required. Note: Matriculated in Saunders undergraduate accounting program. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with at least 2nd year standing in ACCT-BS program. Co-requisite: ACCT-360 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
ACCT-360
Intermediate Financial Accounting I
Extensive exposure to the accounting cycle with full integration of the data flow in an accounting information system. Accounting theory developed by accounting standard-setting bodies is covered in-depth. Generally accepted accounting principles are discussed as they apply to the preparation of financial statements and the recognition and measurement of financial statement elements, primarily assets. International Financial Reporting Standards are introduced as they relate to course subject matter. (Prerequisites: ACCT-210 or NACC-206 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ACCT-365
Intermediate Financial Accounting II
In-depth consideration of generally accepted accounting principles and theory as they apply to the recognition and measurement of common liabilities and stockholders’ equity, as well as income taxes, pensions and leases. Issues related to dilutive securities, earnings per share, accounting changes, revenue recognition, and the statement of cash flows are also addressed. International Financial Reporting Standards are introduced as they relate to course subject matter. (Prerequisites: ACCT-360 or 0101-408 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
BLEG-250
General Education - Elective: Law, Business, and Society
This course provides an introductory survey of significant aspects of how select laws in the U.S. affect and are affected by society and commercial enterprises. The focus is on legal principles and societal considerations. Ethical issues in certain contexts will be discussed as well. Students will be introduced to basic legal research. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
COMM-253
General Education – Elective: Communication
An introduction to communication contexts and processes emphasizing both conceptual and practical dimensions. Participants engage in public speaking, small group problem solving and leadership, and writing exercises while acquiring theoretical background appropriate to understanding these skills. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
FINC-220
Financial Management
Basic course in financial management. Covers business organization, time value of money, valuation of securities, capital budgeting decision rules, risk-return relation, Capital Asset Pricing Model, financial ratios, global finance, and working capital management. (Prerequisites: (ECON-101 or ECON-201) and ACCT-110 and (STAT-145 or STAT-251 or CQAS-251 or MATH-251 or MATH-252 or STAT-205) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
INTB-225
General Education – Elective: Global Business Environment
Being an informed global citizen requires an understanding of the global business environment. Organizations critical to the development of the global business environment include for-profit businesses, non-profits, governmental, non-governmental, and supranational agencies. This course introduces students to the interdependent relationships between organizations and the global business environment. A holistic approach is used to examine the diverse economic, political, legal, cultural, and financial systems that influence both organizations and the global business environment. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-161
General Education – Elective: Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement Exam score greater than or equal to 45.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
4
MGMT-215
Organizational Behavior
As an introductory course in managing and leading organizations, this course provides an overview of human behavior in organizations at the individual, group, and organizational level with an emphasis on enhancing organizational effectiveness. Topics include: individual differences, work teams, motivation, communication, leadership, conflict resolution, organizational culture, and organizational change. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MKTG-230
Principles of Marketing
An introduction to the field of marketing, stressing its role in the organization and society. Emphasis is on determining customer needs and wants and how the marketer can satisfy those needs through the controllable marketing variables of product, price, promotion and distribution. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3, Recitation 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
Third Year
ACCT-420
Personal and Small Business Taxation
A basic introductory course in federal income taxation. Emphasis is on taxation of individuals and sole proprietorships. Topics include income measurement and deductibility of personal and business expenses. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or NACC-205 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ACCT-430
Cost Accounting
Intermediate-level coverage of operational budgeting and performance evaluation. Development and use of cost data for external reporting and internal planning and control. Topics include operational budgeting, performance evaluation, job costing, process costing, joint product, and by-product costing, service department cost allocation, standard costing, activity-based costing, back-flush costing, and transfer pricing. Development of relevant cost information for special purposes is also considered. (Prerequisites: ACCT-210 or NACC-206 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
DECS-310
Operations Management
A survey of operations and supply chain management that relates to both service- and goods- producing organizations. Topics include operations and supply chain strategies; ethical behavior; forecasting; product and service design, including innovation and sustainability; capacity and inventory management; lean operations; managing projects; quality assurance; global supply chains; and the impacts of technology. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MGMT-340
General Education – Ethical Perspective: Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
This course applies concepts of ethics to business at the macro level and at the micro level. At the macro level the course examines competing business ideologies exploring the ethical concerns of capitalism as well as the role of business in society. At the micro level the course examines the role of the manager in establishing an ethical climate with an emphasis on the development of ethical leadership in business organizations. The following topics are typically discussed: the stakeholder theory of the firm, corporate governance, marketing and advertising ethics, the rights and responsibilities of employees, product safety, ethical reasoning, business's responsibility to the environment, moving from a culture of compliance to a culture of integrity, and ethical leadership. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective†
3
 
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Open Elective
3
Fourth Year
ACCT-490
Auditing
A study of the legal, ethical, and technical environment in which the auditor works. Current auditing theory, standards, procedures, and techniques are studied. The audit process is studied to ascertain how it leads to the development of an audit opinion. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act and internal control issues are examined. Students are also introduced to accountants’ professional responsibility. (Prerequisites: ACCT-365 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ACCT-745
Accounting Information and Analytics
The objective for this course is helping students develop a data mindset which prepare them to interact with data scientists from an accountant perspective. This course enables students to develop analytics skills to conduct descriptive, diagnostic, predictive, and prescriptive analysis for accounting information. This course focuses on such topics as data modeling, relational databases, blockchain, visualization, unstructured data, web scraping, and data extraction. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110 or ACCT-603 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
3
MGMT-560
Strategic Management
A capstone course drawing upon major business functions—accounting, finance, marketing, operations management, and organizational theory and how strategic managers integrate functional theories and concepts to create competitive advantage. The course provides an integrated perspective of business organizations toward the achievement of enhanced profitability and a sustainable competitive advantage. Topics include the analysis of business environments, industry attractiveness, and competitive dynamics. Students learn how to formulate and implement effective business-level, corporate-level, and global strategies using theories, cases and a simulation. (Prerequisites: MGMT-215 and MKTG-230 and FINC-220 and DECS-310 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Electives
9
 
General Education - Immersion 3
3
 
Open Electives
9
Fifth Year
ACCT-738
Information Systems Auditing and Assurance Services
An examination of the unique risks, controls, and assurance services resulting from and related to auditing financial information systems with an emphasis on enterprise resource systems. (Prerequisites: ACCT-705 or equivalent course. Pre- or Corequisites: ACCT-708 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ACCT-796
Accounting Capstone Experience
The principal focus of this course is students completing several projects provided by members of CPA firms and industry employers. Employers provide assignments, which may include data or require students to gather relevant data, and students use defined technology, which may include a variety of applications common in technological accounting practice, to complete projects in teams. Students also write comprehensive individual reports and analyses related to the projects. Peripheral work in the course includes examination of theoretical concepts, definitions, and models espoused in the accounting literature and relevant to analyzing various contemporary issues in financial accounting and reporting. The historical development of accounting standards and contemporary issues in financial reporting are integrated. The course requires writing and student presentations. Subject to approval by the Program Director, an individual student internship/coop followed by an in-depth report may obtain equivalent credit. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BANA-680
Data Management for Business Analytics
This course introduces students to data management and analytics in a business setting. Students learn how to formulate hypotheses, collect and manage relevant data, and use standard tools such as Python and R in their analyses. The course exposes students to structured data as well as semi-structured and unstructured data. There are no pre or co-requisites; however, instructor permission is required for students not belonging to the MS-Business Analytics or other quantitative programs such as the MS-Computational Finance which have program-level pre-requisites in the areas of calculus, linear algebra, and programming. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BANA-780
Advanced Business Analytics
This course provides foundational, advanced knowledge in the realm of business analytics. Advanced topics such as machine learning, analysis of structured data, text mining, and network analysis are covered. Industry standard tools such as R and Python are extensively used in completing student projects. (Prerequisite: BANA-680 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
FINC-780
Financial Analytics
This course provides a survey of financial analytics applications in contexts such as investment analysis, portfolio construction, risk management, and security valuation. Students are introduced to financial models used in these applications and their implementation using popular languages such as R, Matlab, and Python, and packages such as Quantlib. A variety of data sources are used: financial websites such as www.finance.yahoo.com, government sites such as www.sec.gov, finance research databases such as WRDS, and especially Bloomberg terminals. Students will complete projects using real-world data and make effective use of visualization methods in reporting results. There are no pre or co-requisites; however, instructor permission is required – student aptitude for quantitative work will be assessed; waived for students enrolled in quantitative programs such as the MS-Computational Finance which have pre-requisites in the areas of calculus, linear algebra, and programming. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MGIS-650
Introduction to Data Analytics and Business Intelligence
This course serves as an introduction to data analysis including both descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Contemporary data analytics and business intelligence tools will be explored through realistic problem assignments. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
 
Graduate Electives
6
 
MGIS or BANA approved analytics/technology elective
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
151

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and lab portions to satisfy the requirement.

‡ Students must also complete one semester of cooperative education.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations
3 years of math required; pre-calculus recommended

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree
Courses in economics, accounting, liberal arts, science, and mathematics

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer
AS degree in accounting or business administration

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

Accreditation

Saunders College of Business undergraduate and graduate programs are fully accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International, the premier accrediting organization for business schools. Less than five percent of the institutions granting business degrees have received this accreditation.

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