Film and Animation BFA

Film and Animation (animation option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ARTH-135
General Education – Global Perspective: History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
In this course students will examine the forms, styles, functions, and meanings of important objects and monuments dating from prehistory through the Middle Ages, and consider these works of art in their social, historical and cultural contexts. The primary goals of this course are to learn how to look, how to describe and analyze what we see, and how to use these skills to understand and explain how art visually expresses meaning. At the end of the term, students will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of the discipline of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ARTH-136
General Education – Elective: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
In this course students will examine the forms, styles, functions, and meanings of important objects and monuments dating from the European Renaissance through the beginning of the twentieth century, and consider these works of art in their social, historical and cultural contexts. The primary goals of this course are to learn how to look and how to describe and analyze what we see, and to use these skills to understand and explain how art visually expresses meaning. At the end of the term, students will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of the discipline of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-101
Production
A fundamental course in non-synchronous film production and an introduction to digital video editing. Filmmaking is presented as a means of interpretation and expression. This course combines technical information in motion picture exposure and editing with a theoretical and practical approach to motion picture continuity. Production is in non-sync format and post-production is digital software. Students furnish film, tape and processing. **Fee: There is a lab free required for this course. ** (This class is restricted to 1st and 2nd year students in FILMAN-BFA or DIGCIME-BS.) Lecture 2, Studio 3 (Fall Or Spring).
3
SOFA-107
Principles of Animation
This course will introduce the concepts and mechanics of movement for animation, focusing on, but not limited to, character based movement. Animation principles will be introduced and applied using hand-drawn methods, which will serve as the foundation for their application in any desired medium. Weekly exercises will be recorded using standard animation software, and will be reviewed, discussed and open to group critique. (Prerequisite: SOFA-121 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
SOFA-121
General Education – Artistic Perspective: Animation I
This class will introduce students to the gamut of animation thinking and making through classroom instruction and hands-on practical experience. Lecture and readings will emphasize the process, theory and practice of animated filmmaking with extensive film screenings to illustrate each technique and related aesthetics. Hands-on supervised studio sessions will guide students to an intuitive understanding of the process of producing animation and students will use this understanding to analyze various animated works. Each student will develop their personal vision through assigned projects utilizing the material discussed in class. **This course has a facilities fee for Non-SOFA students.** Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-122
Fundamentals of Computers and Imaging Technology
This course provides an introductory overview to computer systems and to principles associated with motion picture technologies. Topics covered include computer history, basics in computer architecture basics, operating systems, HTML and networking. Human vision and perception, image capture and display technologies (both analog and digital), digital image processing and post-production equipment and software are also covered. The course focuses on exposing the students to basic principles necessary to proceed with subsequent courses with production or animation focus. (This class is restricted to 1st and 2nd year students in FILMAN-BFA.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-131
Film History and Theory I
Film History and Theory I is a motion picture examination and readings course. It will give media production students the opportunity to trace the development of many of the techniques and forms in what now constitute traditional and expanded definitions of cinema. The course is taught from the perspective of a practicing filmmaker involved in the critical exploration of film language as well as its historical and cultural dimensions. In addition to lectures, the course includes weekly screenings of seminal works from the history of cinema. Screenings support class lectures. (This class is restricted to 1st and 2nd year students in FILMAN-BFA or DIGCIME-BS.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
Choose one of the following:
3
   FDTN-121
   2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience. (Undergraduate Art and Design) Studio 6 (Fall, Spring).
 
   FDTN-131
   3D Design I
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering** (Undergraduate Art and Design) Studio 6 (Fall, Spring).
 
Choose one of the following:
3
   SOFA-108
   Drawing for Animation (2D)
This course focuses on the mechanics of motion as applied to animated characters, both human and non-human. Working directly from a live model, costumed and nude, and also employing visualization techniques, students will apply figure-drawing skills along with gesture drawing, focusing on the correct representation of weight, energy and force in sequential poses. Specific attention is paid to improving drawing skills in order to create stronger storytelling poses for animated properties. A variety of drawn animation examples will be screened in class. (Prerequisite: SOFA-121 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
 
   SOFA-209
   Introduction to 3D Modeling (3D)
Students create models for animation in three-dimensional software. Students learn various modeling, texturing, and lighting techniques that apply to animation and digital cinematography. Students' model, texture and light three-dimensional environments. (Prerequisites: SOFA-121 or equivalent course. Co-requisite: SOFA-107 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
 
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
SOFA-205
Basic Sound Recording
Students will learn to work with sound and to distinguish and evaluate proper sound techniques for film and animation productions. The course lays the foundation for professional work in the sound industry. Each student records audio and prepares a mixed soundtrack to professional quality standards. (Prerequisite: SOFA-101 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-221
After Effects for Animators
This course will teach students the basics of Adobe After Effects. Students will learn production theory as well as gain practical experience in 2.5 D animation production. (Prerequisite: SOFA-107 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
SOFA-217
Animation Production Workshop I
This course will provide the first practical experience of building a complete animated film from conception to finish. Students will apply their knowledge within the greater context of an animation production pipeline. Weekly workshops are focused on helping students plan, develop, and execute their work with regular milestones and deadlines. Students will practice time-management and build skills to adhere to deadlines, and will present their completed films to the RIT community. (Prerequisite: SOFA-203, SOFA-215, SOFA-522 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 4 (Spring).
4
SOFA-225
Performance Resources for Animation
In this course students will examine facial expressions and learn how to create emotion in the face. Advanced rigging techniques, especially pertaining to the faces, will be presented. Students will be presented with techniques to dissect sentences and reconstruct them in to useable connected speech for animated characters. Students will produce a series of short three-dimensional computer animations using a pre-rigged character. (Prerequisite: SOFA-107 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
SOFA-228
Animation Scriptwriting and Storyboard (WI-PR)
This course concentrates on the structures of temporal organization for the screen in all animated productions. Particular attention is paid to the structures of scriptwriting and the layout of movements and visual composition via editing into storyboards. Various individual written script projects will be required of the student, leading to a final production script for an animated film that will be fully storyboarded and formatted. Particular attention will be paid to the visual storytelling aspects of converting a written script. Layouts from the production will also be developed. (Prerequisites: FDTN-121 or FDTN-131 or equivalent courses and completion of First Year Writing (FYW) requirement. Co-requisites: SOFA-203 or SOFA-215 or SOFA-522 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
SOFA-541
History and Aesthetics of Animation (WI-PR)
This course will explore the beginnings, the evolution, the creative and practical history of the animated film, including prehistory of animation, early film and animation history, major trends, artists, animation studios, theoretical distinctions and international identities in animation. Issues of animation aesthetics will also be elucidated through discussions, readings and reviews of exemplary films to emphasize the unique characteristics of the animated art form and how those characteristics are used as a means of interpretation and expression. Both orthodox and unorthodox animation will be highlighted. Films will be screened at every lecture. (Prerequisites: SOFA-121 or equivalent course and completion of First Year Writing (FYW) requirement.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
SOFA-203
2D Animation I (2D)
This course focuses specifically on the sequential stages of hand-drawn digital animation. Students will explore every stage of production of a short animated scene, including dialogue, from ideation to clean up. Each week builds on the previous week’s progress. The final result is a complete rough-animated scene. (Prerequisites: SOFA-107 and SOFA-108 or equivalent courses.) Studio 6 (Fall).
 
SOFA-215
3D Animation I (3D)
This course is an introduction to three-dimensional computer animation and character rigging. The basic principles of animation will be addressed in relation to three-dimensional animation. Character rigging techniques are presented and will include skeletons and animation controls. Students produce a series of short 3D computer animations and some basic character rigs. Students will become familiar with a variety of 3D computer animation techniques. (Prerequisite: SOFA-107 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
 
SOFA-522
Stop Motion Puppet Fundamentals
This is an introductory course that will give students a basic and solid understanding of stop-motion animation. The class covers all aspects of stop-motion in its various forms but will mainly concentrate on stop-motion puppet/character animation. There will be demonstrations on model fabrication, animation techniques and camera/grip techniques. More in-depth topics, like latex and silicon mold making and intensive post production techniques will be introduced. There will be opportunities for students to practice animation with specific goals and assignments. (Prerequisite: SOFA-107 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
 
Choose one of the following:
3
SOFA-224
2D Digital Animation (2D)
This course will introduce students to two-dimensional computer animation, adapting traditional techniques to the digital production environment. Students will learn how to use specialized 2D animation software to produce short exercises adapted from traditional animation techniques. Students should be able to apply 2D digital animation tools into their own work. (Prerequisite: SOFA-107 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
 
SOFA-226
Advanced 3D Modeling (3D)
This course will focus on three-dimensional character modeling. Students will learn about anatomy and creating economical topology for deformation in animation and be introduced to industry-standard digital sculpting techniques. (Prerequisites: SOFA-209 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
 
Choose one of the following:
3
SOFA-216
3D Animation II (3D)
In this course students will learn the mechanics of motion within characters. Complete character-rigging techniques will be discussed and demonstrated. Students will gain further knowledge of a variety of three-dimensional computer animation techniques and will produce a series of short 3D computer animations using a pre-rigged character. (Prerequisite: SOFA-215 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
 
SOFA-218
Concept and Character Design (2D)
This course will introduce students to the basics of design as applied to characters and environments for animated productions. Students will create and develop a cast of characters for an imagined property, focusing on group dynamics, visual appeal and personality development. Line, color, texture, shape, form and story are referenced when developing characters and environments. Students will institute a process of visual development through a variety of exercises, working toward a final, finished project. (Prerequisite: SOFA-203 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
 
SOFA-533
Advanced Stop Motion Techniques
This course will introduce stop motion students to advanced techniques of photographic single frame production. This course will concentrate on fabrication techniques from sculpting to mold building, including an introduction to three-dimensional printing. History and the specific language of stop motion will be covered. Camera and camera lenses and lighting are explored along with various exercises in animation. (Prerequisites: SOFA-522 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
 
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective
 
 
   General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective
 
 
   General Education – Mathematical Perspective A or B
 
Third Year
SOFA-306
Senior Capstone Seminar
Students discuss and generate written plans for their senior films or capstone projects. Each student will secure a film and animation faculty adviser for their senior year. (Co-requisite: Successful completion of one of the following courses: SOFA-211 or SOFA-212 or SOFA-213 or SOFA-317 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 2 (Spring).
1
SOFA-317
Animation Production Workshop II
Students will explore all phases of animation short film production. Students design and produce a short film with sound that must be screened for the RIT community. (Prerequisites: SOFA-217 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
4
SOFA-518
Business and Careers in Animation
This course will focus on the role of the small animation business owner, the studio employee, and the individual freelance animator in developing a small business. The elements of discussion will teach students how to approach animation work in the industry from a small business perspective. This course will discuss the creation of sample reels, websites, self-promotion, contracts, pitching, fund-raising, research and interview techniques all related to the individual in animation. Ethics and individual responsibilities will also be discussed. Professionals working in the animation industry will often be guests for the class. (Prerequisites: SOFA-317 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
   SOFA-323
   2D Animation II: Performance
This course will focus on the continued development of students’ skills in the two-dimension animation medium, using computer software. As an intermediate course, students will build on the skills they accrued as well as learn new, advanced techniques. A variety of examples of 2D computer animation will be screened in class. (Prerequisites: SOFA-218 or equivalent course.) Studio 6 (Spring).
 
   SOFA-575
   3D Lighting and Rendering
This course is an intensive look at lighting for three-dimensional animation pipelines. Students will learn to observe, plan and replicate real-world environments and expand those into artistic interpretations of style and design. There will be a strong focus on surfacing, set-dressing, production design, as well as economical rendering techniques. Students will learn to identify the balance between artistic needs and technical limitations and how to adequately prepare a scene for post-production practices. (Prerequisite: SOFA-216 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
 
   SOFA-582
   Alternative Frame By Frame
This course will give all students a chance to explore three different approaches to stop-motion animation. The class will study and experiment with pixilation, time-lapse and relief animation with a “down-shooter.” These techniques will expand the student’s knowledge of traditional and experimental animation and present an alternative means of expression. The class will study existing work with these techniques, analyze and discuss them with the instructor and then produce several examples of their own work after instruction for each approach. There will be a final project in the technique of the student’s choice. (This class is restricted to students with majors in CAD and at least 3rd year student standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
 
 
CAD Electives‡
6
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1 (WI-GE)
3
 
Open Electives
6
Fourth Year
SOFA-411
Animation Capstone I
The first of two classes designed to advance students toward the completion of a capstone. It will advance students from capstone proposal toward the completion of a project. Students will also take part in weekly critiques to present their work and discuss the work of their classmates. At the completion of this course, students should be at the halfway point of their set project. (Prerequisite: SOFA-306 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
4
SOFA-412
Animation Capstone II
This course will lead students toward the completion of their capstone. Students will take part in weekly critiques to present their work and discuss the work of their classmates. At the completion of this course, students will complete their capstone and take part in a public screening of their finished work. (Prerequisite: SOFA-411 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
SOFA-501
Animatic Day
This course will allow students the opportunity to receive feedback on their in-progress capstone project. Students will be required to submit their work by a determined deadline and then take constructive feedback. At the completion of this course, students will decide how to implement the criticism they received with their advisor to better their work. 20 hours of class over one weekend in fall semester. (Co-requisite: SOFA-411 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 20 (Fall).
1
 
History and Aesthetics Elective
3
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Immersion 2, 3
6
 
CAD Elective‡
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ CAD Elective - any College of Art and Design course.

Electives

History and Aesthetics Electives
Course
ARTH-###
Any "ARTH" undergraduate course
GRDE-322
Women Pioneers in Design
This course will center on the contributions made by Modernist women designers. Emphasis will be placed on their unheralded pioneering efforts. Exemplars from the field will be presented, set in a historical context. Lectures are complemented by guest speakers, videos, participatory exercises, discussion, and critical essay writing. (This course is restricted to undergraduate students in CAD with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
GRDE-326
20th Century Editorial Design History
This course is a thematic approach to the history of magazine design and provides a necessary historical basis for students in the visual arts and design. The course involves lectures on editorial designers, other pioneering Modernist designers, and design from other countries. Exemplars from the field are presented, set in a wide historical context. Lectures are complemented by guest speakers, videos, participatory exercises, discussion, and critical essay writing. (This course is restricted to undergraduate students in CAD with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
PHAR-211
Histories and Aesthetics of Photography I
The objective of this course, part one of a two semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography as utilized for fine art, snapshot, documentary, scientific, commercial and propaganda purposes in a global perspective. Course lectures include the medium's pre-history and a detailed development of the camera obscura. Students will learn about many technical processes, as well as, the multiple interpretations of notable images during the period 1800-1915. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
PHAR-212
Histories and Aesthetics of Photography II
The objective of this course, the second course of a two-semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography from the development of Modernism to the present, including the medium's transformation by digital imaging in the 21st century. Photography's applications within fine art, documentary, scientific, journalistic, commercial and vernacular practices will be investigated within a global perspective, but primary emphasis is placed upon developments and movements within the United States and Europe. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
SOFA-511
Film Sound Theory: Music
This course is one of three in the study of film sound theory. Through readings, focused group discussion, and the viewing of/listening to select films, the course promotes critical analysis of the varied and profound uses of music in sound design. Addressed is the history of music from the silent era to the modern score. The concepts studied include the modal changes in point-of-audition, and positioning across diegeses. Newer topics including audio-visualization and ventriloquism theory are also addressed. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOFA-512
Film Sound Theory: Effects
This course is one of three in the study of film sound theory. Through readings, focused group discussion, and the viewing of/listening to select films, the course promotes critical analysis of the varied and profound uses of effects in sound design. Addressed is the history of effects from the early sound era to the modern design. The concepts studied include the modal changes in point-of-audition, and positioning across diegeses. Other topics like complementarity and the acousmetre acousmatic are also addressed. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOFA-513
Film Sound Theory: Voice
This course is one of three in the study of film sound theory. This course will promote critical analysis of the varied and profound uses of music in sound design through readings, focused group discussion, and viewing and listening to select films. The history of voice from the silent era to the modern sound design will be addressed. The concepts studied include the modal changes in point-of-audition, and positioning across diegeses. Other topics include the acousmetre and the mute, vococentric mixing and separation, relativizing, and dialogue theory. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOFA-561
New Documentary Issues
This course will examine the current trends in documentary film during the last decade. Students will view 1-2 documentary films each week. Students will examine each film critically; analyzing the film’s theme, structure, style, relationship to reality, and effectiveness. In addition, students will examine how current filmmakers interpret and build upon the basic ideas and discourse that have defined documentary filmmaking since its beginnings. (Prerequisites: SOFA-106 or SOFA-131 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall).
SOFA-562
Film History
This course examines selected, varying film topics in a wider socio-historical context. Seminar themes change each year and may include topics such as post-war German film, films of the Holocaust, Japanese film, surrealist and magic realist film, Soviet film, Native Americans on film, etc. Students are expected to participate actively in the course discussions. (Prerequisites: SOFA-106 or SOFA-131 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).
SOFA-566
Documentary Film History
This course will examine the development of documentary film from 1920 to the present day. Students will explore central themes in documentary filmmaking, including the Grierson social documentary, the Flaherty romantic tradition, cinema verite, propaganda films, first-person narratives, and experimental documentary. Through film viewings, class discussions, and assigned readings, the students will critically examine how documentary film is constructed, keeping in mind the critical relationship between the film’s content and its meaning. (Prerequisite: SOFA-131 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Spring).
SOIS-242
Comics: Image & Text in Popular Culture
An interdisciplinary course in comics and related media that blend image and text. By reading and discussing a range of comics and comics-related works, from 19th-century lithographs and newspaper comic strips, to superhero comics and works of art that make use of comics, we will learn both how to analyze comics and how the medium of comics emerged in and remains vital to popular culture. Through the use of interdisciplinary methods and resources in art history, communications and journalism, literary studies, material culture studies, rhetoric, sociology, and visual culture studies, we will also explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and global significance of comics. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
SOIS-542
Art Comics
This course will explore how the comics medium has figured into the history of modern and contemporary art, visual culture, and literary culture. Students will explore how cartooning, drawing, and printmaking in the 19th century led to the development of early comics and the newspaper comic strip, how early 20th century comics fit into the modernist avant-garde, how postwar artists began to use the comics medium as both source material and as a medium unto itself, how comics have been incorporated into contemporary art museums and galleries, and how contemporary comics artists engage with abstraction, medium specificity, seriality, and the archive. The course will draw from an interdisciplinary range of methodologies, from art history and visual culture to literary studies and museum studies. Lecture 3 (Fall).

Film and Animation (production option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ARTH-135
General Education – Global Perspective: History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
In this course students will examine the forms, styles, functions, and meanings of important objects and monuments dating from prehistory through the Middle Ages, and consider these works of art in their social, historical and cultural contexts. The primary goals of this course are to learn how to look, how to describe and analyze what we see, and how to use these skills to understand and explain how art visually expresses meaning. At the end of the term, students will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of the discipline of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ARTH-136
General Education – Elective: History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
In this course students will examine the forms, styles, functions, and meanings of important objects and monuments dating from the European Renaissance through the beginning of the twentieth century, and consider these works of art in their social, historical and cultural contexts. The primary goals of this course are to learn how to look and how to describe and analyze what we see, and to use these skills to understand and explain how art visually expresses meaning. At the end of the term, students will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of the discipline of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-101
Production
A fundamental course in non-synchronous film production and an introduction to digital video editing. Filmmaking is presented as a means of interpretation and expression. This course combines technical information in motion picture exposure and editing with a theoretical and practical approach to motion picture continuity. Production is in non-sync format and post-production is digital software. Students furnish film, tape and processing. **Fee: There is a lab free required for this course. ** (This class is restricted to 1st and 2nd year students in FILMAN-BFA or DIGCIME-BS.) Lecture 2, Studio 3 (Fall Or Spring).
3
SOFA-105
Documentary Field Practices
This foundation level course introduces students to documentary film as a creative and socially engaging form of storytelling. In addition to aesthetic and conceptual skills, production techniques focus on the ability to develop filming strategies, gathering clean sound, filming to edit, and interviewing skills. In addition, the relationship between filmmaker and subject, will be examined, including the ethical challenges of representing real life subjects. Critical thinking skills will be employed as we analyze the different styles of documentary film. Students will work in small documentary crews out in the field learning the use of microphones, field lighting, handheld and other non-traditional camerawork, selecting/interviewing documentary subjects and capturing material with proper coverage in order to build scenes in the edit room. (Prerequisite: SOFA-101 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
4
SOFA-112
Fundamentals of Screenwriting
This course will introduce students to the forms and techniques of writing for visual media, particularly the short film. Students will develop resources for finding stories and concepts that can be turned into films. Students will be responsible for writing a short script of their own choosing and for completing several brief written exercises in areas such as personal storytelling, character development, dialogue, and plot. Scripts written in this course can be used as the basis for films produced in other classes. (This class is restricted to 1st and 2nd year students in FILMAN-BFA or DIGCIME-BS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
SOFA-121
General Education – Artistic Perspective: Animation I
This class will introduce students to the gamut of animation thinking and making through classroom instruction and hands-on practical experience. Lecture and readings will emphasize the process, theory and practice of animated filmmaking with extensive film screenings to illustrate each technique and related aesthetics. Hands-on supervised studio sessions will guide students to an intuitive understanding of the process of producing animation and students will use this understanding to analyze various animated works. Each student will develop their personal vision through assigned projects utilizing the material discussed in class. **This course has a facilities fee for Non-SOFA students.** Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-122
Fundamentals of Computers and Imaging Technology
This course provides an introductory overview to computer systems and to principles associated with motion picture technologies. Topics covered include computer history, basics in computer architecture basics, operating systems, HTML and networking. Human vision and perception, image capture and display technologies (both analog and digital), digital image processing and post-production equipment and software are also covered. The course focuses on exposing the students to basic principles necessary to proceed with subsequent courses with production or animation focus. (This class is restricted to 1st and 2nd year students in FILMAN-BFA.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-131
Film History and Theory I
Film History and Theory I is a motion picture examination and readings course. It will give media production students the opportunity to trace the development of many of the techniques and forms in what now constitute traditional and expanded definitions of cinema. The course is taught from the perspective of a practicing filmmaker involved in the critical exploration of film language as well as its historical and cultural dimensions. In addition to lectures, the course includes weekly screenings of seminal works from the history of cinema. Screenings support class lectures. (This class is restricted to 1st and 2nd year students in FILMAN-BFA or DIGCIME-BS.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
Second Year
SOFA-202
Production Processes
This course is an introduction to all aspects of professional film/video narrative production. Students produce short projects while learning basic shooting and crewing procedures, studio protocol, equipment handling and maintenance, and basic sync editing. (Prerequisite: SOFA-101 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2, Studio 10 (Fall, Spring).
6
SOFA-205
Basic Sound Recording
Students will learn to work with sound and to distinguish and evaluate proper sound techniques for film and animation productions. The course lays the foundation for professional work in the sound industry. Each student records audio and prepares a mixed soundtrack to professional quality standards. (Prerequisite: SOFA-101 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-206
Directing
This course is an introduction to the arts of directing and acting with an emphasis on script analysis, performance, and blocking. Students direct and act in scenes from professional productions. Scenes are rehearsed outside of class, and then staged and critiqued in class. (Prerequisites: SOFA-102 or SOFA-101 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
SOFA-208
Dramatic Structure (WI-PR)
This course explores the theories of dramatic structure from Aristotle to the present and applies these theories to current and classic dramatic works. The class also explores dramatic script structure as it is used in dramatic works on stage and screen. (Prerequisites: SOFA-112 and (SOFA-131 or SOFA-106) or equivalent courses and completion of First Year Writing (FYW) requirement.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
Choose one of the following:
4
   SOFA-211
   Documentary Workshop
Students will make a short documentary film on a subject they choose. Students plan for pre-production including research, contacting possible subjects, and writing a proposal. During the production phase of the film, students will learn interviewing skills, how to direct a documentary crew, and how to work with their subjects. During post production students will learn how to organize their material into a short film. Students will complete projects for screening at the end of the semester. Students can retake this course as a SOFA elective after completing Fiction Workshop or Radical Cinema Workshop. (Prerequisite: SOFA-105 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
 
   SOFA-212
   Fiction Workshop
Students will direct short fiction projects using either film or digital media and also serve on the production crew for other projects. Students specializing in a cinematic craft will work in important creative capacities on two or more projects. Students are encouraged to explore individual styles and concepts. Intensive pre-production protocol and documentation are followed. Editing and sound design will be completed as well. Students will complete projects for screening at the end of the semester. Students can retake this course as a SOFA elective once they have completed Documentary or Radical Cinema Workshop. (Prerequisite: SOFA-202 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
 
   SOFA-213
   Radical Cinema Workshop
Students will produce at least one major artistic work that uses the moving image. This course demands the use of alternative expressions in concept, style, or technology, and students are encouraged to take risks, break "rules" and explore their own unique creative potential. Students may work in a variety of media, depending on their proficiencies and their vision of the project. Students will complete projects for screening at the end of the semester. Students can retake this course as a SOFA elective once they have completed Fiction Workshop or Documentary Workshop. (Prerequisites: SOFA-105 or SOFA-202 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
 
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective
 
 
   General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective
 
 
   General Education – Mathematical Perspective A or B
 
 
SOFA Craft Choice§
3
 
CAD Elective‡
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
SOFA-306
Senior Capstone Seminar
Students discuss and generate written plans for their senior films or capstone projects. Each student will secure a film and animation faculty adviser for their senior year. (Co-requisite: Successful completion of one of the following courses: SOFA-211 or SOFA-212 or SOFA-213 or SOFA-317 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 2 (Spring).
1
SOFA-514
Business and Careers in Film
An introduction to all aspects of the business side of professional film/video narrative documentary and commercial production. Students will form production companies and develop a business plan while considering alternative careers in film, basic financial and legal protocol, and mental preparation needed to enter the film business market. Resumes and reels are assigned projects. (Prerequisite: SOFA-202 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
4
   SOFA-211
   Documentary Workshop
Students will make a short documentary film on a subject they choose. Students plan for pre-production including research, contacting possible subjects, and writing a proposal. During the production phase of the film, students will learn interviewing skills, how to direct a documentary crew, and how to work with their subjects. During post production students will learn how to organize their material into a short film. Students will complete projects for screening at the end of the semester. Students can retake this course as a SOFA elective after completing Fiction Workshop or Radical Cinema Workshop. (Prerequisite: SOFA-105 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
 
   SOFA-212
   Fiction Workshop
Students will direct short fiction projects using either film or digital media and also serve on the production crew for other projects. Students specializing in a cinematic craft will work in important creative capacities on two or more projects. Students are encouraged to explore individual styles and concepts. Intensive pre-production protocol and documentation are followed. Editing and sound design will be completed as well. Students will complete projects for screening at the end of the semester. Students can retake this course as a SOFA elective once they have completed Documentary or Radical Cinema Workshop. (Prerequisite: SOFA-202 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
 
   SOFA-213
   Radical Cinema Workshop
Students will produce at least one major artistic work that uses the moving image. This course demands the use of alternative expressions in concept, style, or technology, and students are encouraged to take risks, break "rules" and explore their own unique creative potential. Students may work in a variety of media, depending on their proficiencies and their vision of the project. Students will complete projects for screening at the end of the semester. Students can retake this course as a SOFA elective once they have completed Fiction Workshop or Documentary Workshop. (Prerequisites: SOFA-105 or SOFA-202 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
 
 
History and Aesthetics Electives
6
 
CAD Electives‡
6
 
SOFA Craft Choice§
3
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Immersion 1 (WI-GE)
3
Fourth Year
SOFA-416
Production Capstone I
The first of two classes designed to advance students toward the completion of a capstone. It will advance students from capstone proposal toward the completion of a project. Students will also take part in weekly critiques to present their work and discuss the work of their classmates. At the completion of this course, students should be at the halfway point of their set project. (Prerequisite: SOFA-306 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
4
SOFA-417
Production Capstone II
This course will lead students toward the completion of their capstone. Students will take part in weekly critiques, present their work, and discuss the work of their classmates. At the end of this course, students will complete their capstone and take part in a public screening of their finished work or craft experience. (Prerequisite: SOFA-416 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
4
SOFA-506
Production In-Progress Screening
This course will allow students the opportunity to receive feedback on their in-progress capstone project. Students will be required to submit their work by a determined deadline and then take constructive feedback. At the completion of this course, students will decide how to implement the criticism they received with their advisor to better their work. 20 hours of class over one week or weekend in fall semester. (Co-requisite: SOFA-416 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 2 (Fall).
1
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 2, 3
6
 
CAD Elective‡
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
121

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† SOFA production workshop courses include Documentary Workshop (SOFA-211), Fiction Workshop (SOFA-212), and Radical Cinema Workshop (SOFA-213). Students must complete two production workshops over the course of three semesters, starting in the spring of the second year and ending in the spring of the third year. Once the student has completed two different workshops, courses may be repeated for credit.

‡ CAD Elective - any College of Art and Design course.

§ SOFA craft choice courses include Advanced Sound Recording (SOFA-521), Advanced Editing (SOFA-523), Advanced Directing (SOFA-524), Writing the Short (SOFA-526), Advanced Cinematography I (SOFA-578).

Electives

History and Aesthetics Electives
Course
ARTH-###
Any "ARTH" undergraduate course
ANTH-430
Visual Anthropology
We see others as we imagine them to be, in terms of our values, not as they see themselves. This course examines ways in which we understand and represent the reality of others through visual media, across the boundaries of culture, gender, and race. It considers how and why visual media can be used to represent or to distort the world around us. Pictorial media, in particular ethnographic film and photography, are analyzed to document the ways in which indigenous and native peoples in different parts of the world have been represented and imagined by anthropologists and western popular culture. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
FNRT-372
American Film of the Studio Era
This course examines the history and aesthetics of the motion picture in the United States between the 1890s and the early 1960s; emphasis will be placed on the analysis of both the work of major American filmmakers and the development of major American film genres during the Classical Hollywood Studio period. Among the filmmakers to be studied are Griffith, Chaplin, Hawks, Ford, Capra, Welles, Curtiz, Wilder, Donen, Sirk, Ray, Hitchcock, and Kubrick. Genres to be covered include the melodrama, silent comedy, screwball comedy, western, thriller, film noir, newspaper film, and the gangster film. The films will be studied within the context of contemporary cultural and political events, and will be discussed from several viewpoints, including aesthetic, technical, social, and economic. The ways in which gender and class are constructed through the movies will also be a major focus of study. Lecture 3 (Fall).
FNRT-373
American Film Since the Sixties
This course examines the history and aesthetics of the motion picture in the United States since the late 1960s, when the classical studio era ended. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of both the work of major American filmmakers and the evolution of major American film genres between 1967 and 2001. Among the filmmakers to be studied are Kazan, Cassavetes, Penn, Coppola, Scorsese, Spielberg, Allen, Seidelman, Lee, Burton, Altman, Tarantino, Coen, and Lynch. The course will consider the evolution of such traditional Hollywood genres as the gangster film, the romantic comedy, and the Hollywood movie, study the development of new, blended genres, investigate the rise of the blockbuster, explore the rise of the Independents, and follow the aesthetic changes that occurred since the 1967. The films will be studied within the context of contemporary cultural and political events, and will be discussed from several viewpoints, including aesthetic, technical, social, and economic. The ways in which gender, race, and class are constructed through the movies will also be a major focus of study. Lecture 3 (Spring).
GRDE-322
Women Pioneers in Design
This course will center on the contributions made by Modernist women designers. Emphasis will be placed on their unheralded pioneering efforts. Exemplars from the field will be presented, set in a historical context. Lectures are complemented by guest speakers, videos, participatory exercises, discussion, and critical essay writing. (This course is restricted to undergraduate students in CAD with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
GRDE-326
20th Century Editorial Design History
This course is a thematic approach to the history of magazine design and provides a necessary historical basis for students in the visual arts and design. The course involves lectures on editorial designers, other pioneering Modernist designers, and design from other countries. Exemplars from the field are presented, set in a wide historical context. Lectures are complemented by guest speakers, videos, participatory exercises, discussion, and critical essay writing. (This course is restricted to undergraduate students in CAD with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
PHAR-211
Histories and Aesthetics of Photography I
The objective of this course, part one of a two semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography as utilized for fine art, snapshot, documentary, scientific, commercial and propaganda purposes in a global perspective. Course lectures include the medium's pre-history and a detailed development of the camera obscura. Students will learn about many technical processes, as well as, the multiple interpretations of notable images during the period 1800-1915. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
PHAR-212
Histories and Aesthetics of Photography II
The objective of this course, the second course of a two-semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography from the development of Modernism to the present, including the medium's transformation by digital imaging in the 21st century. Photography's applications within fine art, documentary, scientific, journalistic, commercial and vernacular practices will be investigated within a global perspective, but primary emphasis is placed upon developments and movements within the United States and Europe. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
SOFA-511
Film Sound Theory: Music
This course is one of three in the study of film sound theory. Through readings, focused group discussion, and the viewing of/listening to select films, the course promotes critical analysis of the varied and profound uses of music in sound design. Addressed is the history of music from the silent era to the modern score. The concepts studied include the modal changes in point-of-audition, and positioning across diegeses. Newer topics including audio-visualization and ventriloquism theory are also addressed. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOFA-512
Film Sound Theory: Effects
This course is one of three in the study of film sound theory. Through readings, focused group discussion, and the viewing of/listening to select films, the course promotes critical analysis of the varied and profound uses of effects in sound design. Addressed is the history of effects from the early sound era to the modern design. The concepts studied include the modal changes in point-of-audition, and positioning across diegeses. Other topics like complementarity and the acousmetre acousmatic are also addressed. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOFA-513
Film Sound Theory: Voice
This course is one of three in the study of film sound theory. This course will promote critical analysis of the varied and profound uses of music in sound design through readings, focused group discussion, and viewing and listening to select films. The history of voice from the silent era to the modern sound design will be addressed. The concepts studied include the modal changes in point-of-audition, and positioning across diegeses. Other topics include the acousmetre and the mute, vococentric mixing and separation, relativizing, and dialogue theory. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOFA-541
History and Aesthetics of Animation
This course will explore the beginnings, the evolution, the creative and practical history of the animated film, including prehistory of animation, early film and animation history, major trends, artists, animation studios, theoretical distinctions and international identities in animation. Issues of animation aesthetics will also be elucidated through discussions, readings and reviews of exemplary films to emphasize the unique characteristics of the animated art form and how those characteristics are used as a means of interpretation and expression. Both orthodox and unorthodox animation will be highlighted. Films will be screened at every lecture. (Prerequisites: SOFA-121 or equivalent course and completion of First Year Writing (FYW) requirement.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
SOFA-561
New Documentary Issues
This course will examine the current trends in documentary film during the last decade. Students will view 1-2 documentary films each week. Students will examine each film critically; analyzing the film’s theme, structure, style, relationship to reality, and effectiveness. In addition, students will examine how current filmmakers interpret and build upon the basic ideas and discourse that have defined documentary filmmaking since its beginnings. (Prerequisites: SOFA-106 or SOFA-131 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall).
SOFA-562
Film History
This course examines selected, varying film topics in a wider socio-historical context. Seminar themes change each year and may include topics such as post-war German film, films of the Holocaust, Japanese film, surrealist and magic realist film, Soviet film, Native Americans on film, etc. Students are expected to participate actively in the course discussions. (Prerequisites: SOFA-106 or SOFA-131 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).
SOFA-566
Documentary Film History
This course will examine the development of documentary film from 1920 to the present day. Students will explore central themes in documentary filmmaking, including the Grierson social documentary, the Flaherty romantic tradition, cinema verite, propaganda films, first-person narratives, and experimental documentary. Through film viewings, class discussions, and assigned readings, the students will critically examine how documentary film is constructed, keeping in mind the critical relationship between the film’s content and its meaning. (Prerequisite: SOFA-131 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Spring).