ASL-English Interpretation BS - Curriculum

ASL-English Interpretation BS

ASL-English Interpretation, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INTP-125
American Sign Language II (General Education)
In this course, students will develop ASL receptive and expressive skills needed to converse about familiar topics using series of discrete sentences. At the end of the semester, students will achieve effective communication by using vocabulary, grammar, and cultural protocols at a Novice-High level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Activities include delivering monologues and lab exercises that provide extensive hands-on practice using a variety of media. Students are expected to engage with members of the Deaf community in order to learn about Deaf co-culture in the United States. (Prerequisites: MLAS-201 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall).
4
INTP-126
American Sign Language III (General Education)
In this course, students will develop ASL receptive and expressive skills needed to communicate discrete paragraphs composed of connected sentences. At the end of semester, students will achieve effective communication by using vocabulary, grammar, and cultural protocols for conveying details about familiar topics at an Intermediate-Low level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Activities include delivering presentations and lab exercises that provide extensive hands-on practice using a variety of media. Students are expected to engage with members of the Deaf community in order to learn about Deaf co-culture in the United States. (Prerequisites: INTP-125 with a C or better or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lec/Lab 5 (Spring).
4
INTP-210
Introduction to the Field of Interpreting
This survey course provides an introduction to the profession of sign language interpreting. Course content includes an overview of the history of the profession and professional organizations, interpreter role metaphors, the philosophy of practice within the field, and various work settings and protocols. Additionally, demand control schema is introduced as a critical analysis framework to uphold the values which serve the Deaf community and the linguistic and cultural values established in the field. (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A
3
 
General Education – Mathematical Perspective B
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
INTP-215
Processing Skills Development
The act of interpretation is a complex cognitive challenge. Isolating and mastering specific subtasks of the interpreting process is critical for the synthesis of these subskills in the process of translation and interpretation. This course is an introduction to the cognitive processing skills necessary for translation, consecutive interpretation, and simultaneous interpretation. The course includes an overview of theoretical models of translation and interpretation, the development of basic processing subskills that provide a foundation for translation and interpretation, and practice activities for the integration of these tasks in an 8-step discourse analysis process for translation and consecutive interpreting. Course content includes interpreting and translation theory, message analysis, visualization, shadowing, paraphrasing, dual task training, and text analysis. (Prerequisites: INTP-225 and INTP-210 or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
INTP-225
American Sign Language IV
In this course, students will develop ASL receptive and expressive skills needed to communicate discrete paragraphs using complex connected sentences. At the end of the semester, students will achieve effective communication by using vocabulary, grammar, and cultural protocols for conveying details about less familiar topics at an Intermediate-Mid level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Activities include delivering presentations and lab exercises that provide extensive hands-on practice using a variety of media. Students are expected to engage with members of the Deaf community in order to learn about Deaf co-culture in the United States. (Prerequisites: INTP-126 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall).
3
INTP-226
American Sign Language V
In this course, students will develop ASL receptive and expressive skills needed to communicate series of connected paragraphs using complex connected sentences. At the end of the semester, students will achieve effective communication by using vocabulary, grammar, and cultural protocols for conveying details about less familiar topics at an Intermediate-High level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Activities include delivering presentations and lab exercises that provide extensive hands-on practice using a variety of media. Students are expected to engage with members of the Deaf community in order to learn about Deaf co-culture in the United States. (Prerequisites: INTP-225 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lec/Lab 4 (Spring).
3
MLAS-351
Linguistics of American Sign Language (General Education)
Students in this course will be introduced to the study of American Sign Language in terms of its linguistic structure and use. In particular, students will learn to analyze the basic features of ASL phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics/discourse In addition, research related to variation in ASL and acquisition of ASL will also be reviewed. Please note fluency in ASL is required for this course, as instruction is in ASL (an interpreter will not be provided). Seminar 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Deaf Cultural Studies Elective † (General Education)
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective ‡
4
 
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Third Year
INTP-310
Interpreting I
This course introduces the English-to-ASL and ASL-to-English interpreting process with a focus on text analysis and consecutive production of an equivalent target language message. Compression and expansion strategies are introduced. Students develop interpreting management strategies and diagnostic assessment skills. Students interpret monologic and dialogic inquiry and narrative text formats while learning the interpretation process. Students also learn and integrate the features of biomechanics for interpreters to practice safe work habits. (Prerequisites: INTP-215 and INTP-226 or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of C.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
INTP-315
Practical and Ethical Applications
This course presents the underlying principles of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct and other ethical content material, including the four core principles of service professions and how these principles apply to practice settings. This course exposes students to actual interpreting jobs and practitioners, providing students an opportunity to explore how professional interpreters weigh and balance these principles in their daily work and how Deaf and hearing consumers perceive interpreters’ decision-making skills. The course also addresses the distinction between normative and descriptive ethics and their impact on interpreters’ decision-making. Students will have the opportunity to explore reflective practice techniques as a means to develop ethical judgment skills, to gain critical insight into the task of self-regulation, and as a technique to engage in self-care. The ethical constructs of demand control schema will be used as the framework for decision making. Etiquette and protocols specific to each setting will be discussed. Settings include: K-12, post-secondary, religious, healthcare, mental health, DeafBlind, performing arts, legal, VRS, VRI, and business and industry. (Prerequisites: INTP-210 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
INTP-325
American Sign Language VI
In this course, students will develop ASL skills needed to create narratives composed of an introduction, main points, supporting points, transitions, and a closing. At the end of the semester, students will achieve effective communication by using vocabulary, grammar, translation skills, and cultural protocols for conveying details about unfamiliar topics at an Advanced-Low level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Activities include delivering presentations, storytelling, and lab exercises that provide extensive hands-on practice using a variety of media. Students are expected to engage with members of the Deaf community in order to learn about Deaf co-culture in the United States. (Prerequisites: INTP-226 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C or better and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall).
3
INTP-326
American Sign Language VII
In this course, students will develop ASL skills needed to create complex narratives composed of an introduction, main points, supporting points, transitions, and a closing. At the end of the semester, students will achieve effective communication by using grammar, translation skills, and cultural protocols for conveying details about abstract concepts at an Advanced-Mid level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Activities include delivering presentations, storytelling, and lab exercises that provide extensive hands-on practice using a variety of media. Students are expected to engage with members of the Deaf community in order to learn about Deaf co-culture in the United States. (Prerequisites: INTP-325 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lec/Lab 4 (Spring).
3
INTP-335
Interpreting II: English to ASL
Students will develop the ability to produce an equivalent simultaneous ASL message from an English source message. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific discipline areas include interpreting in healthcare, employment, and finance settings. Within those discipline areas, students will have the opportunity to interpret in authentic environments with both Deaf and hearing consumers. Students will continue to develop text analysis skills, applying them to translating and simultaneous interpreting. Students are exposed to self-employment business practices within the interpreting field. Biomechanics and self-care issues will continue to be discussed. (Prerequisites: INTP-310 and INTP-325 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
INTP-336
Interpreting II: ASL to English
Students will develop the ability to produce an equivalent simultaneous English message from an ASL source message. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific discipline areas include interpreting in healthcare, employment, and finance settings. Within those discipline areas, students will have the opportunity to experience interpreting in authentic environments with both Deaf and hearing consumers. Students will continue to develop text analysis skills, applying them to translating and simultaneous interpreting. Additionally, students will develop the ability to apply the principles of diagnostic feedback. (Prerequisites: INTP-310 and INTP-325 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Elective
6
Fourth Year
INTP-350
Practicum and Seminar I
This course combines an introductory practicum experience in the field of ASL-English interpretation with a seminar component to allow senior-level students to engage in reflective practice as they transition into the interpreting profession. Students will undertake field experiences that provide them with firsthand knowledge and familiarity with current topics that impact professional sign language interpreters and the Deaf community. Practicum will also give students the opportunity to gain firsthand experience under the immediate supervision of a professional interpreter, who functions as each student’s mentor. The practicum experience will involve activities such as observing a mentor and other interpreters at work; interpreting under the supervision of a mentor; and weekly meetings with a mentor to discuss the practicum experience and to receive professional feedback. Building upon students’ practicum experiences, students will use the constructs of Demand Control Schema to guide their seminar discussions. Students will meet together weekly with their classmates to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Seminar topics derived from students' field experience will focus on language issues in interpretation, ethical decision making, application of the Code of Professional Conduct, making interpretation choices, and implementing successful business practices as a professional interpreter. Students must complete a minimum of 100 hours of field experience and related activities. (Prerequisites: INTP-315 and INTP-335 and INTP-336 or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of C. This course is restricted to students with at least a 2.5 cumulative GPA.) Seminar 2 (Fall, Spring).
3
INTP-435
Interpreting III: English to ASL
In this course, students will advance their skills in simultaneously producing equivalent ASL messages from English source texts. Monologic expository texts on specific topic areas will be the focus of this course. A significant portion of the interpretation work in this course will take place utilizing speakers and audience members in authentic environments. Students will learn to manage the physical setting (logistics) and to select and use appropriate technology when applicable. Students will continue to develop their English and ASL vocabulary and interpreting analysis skills; in addition, they will develop team interpreting skills and increase stamina. (Prerequisites: INTP-335 and INTP-326 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
INTP-436
Interpreting III: ASL to English
In this course students will advance their skills in simultaneously interpreting from ASL to English. Monologues and expository texts on specific topic areas will be the focus of this course. A significant portion of the interpretation work in this course will take place utilizing speakers and audience members in authentic environments. Students will learn to manage the physical setting (logistics) and to select and use appropriate technology when applicable. Students will continue to hone their English and ASL vocabulary and interpretation analysis skills; in addition, they will develop team interpreting skills and increase stamina. (Prerequisites: INTP-336 and INTP-326 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
INTP-455
Practicum II
This course continues the practicum experience for senior-level ASL-English interpretation students that was initiated in the Practicum & Seminar I course. Students will continue to undertake field experiences that provide them with firsthand knowledge and familiarity with current topics and issues that impact professional sign language interpreters and the Deaf community. Students will benefit by gaining firsthand experience, supervision, and feedback from mentors. Students must complete a minimum of 205 hours of field experience and related activities. (Prerequisites: INTP-350 and INTP-435 and INTP-436 or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of C. This course is restricted to students with at least a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Co-requisite: INTP-456 or equivalent course.) Seminar (Fall, Spring).
4
INTP-456
Seminar II
This course is a culminating seminar experience in which students will engage in reflective practice as they transition into the interpreting profession. Building upon students’ practicum experiences, this course provides an opportunity to discuss current topics and issues that impact professional sign language interpreters and the Deaf community. Using the constructs of Demand Control Schema to guide discussions, students will meet together weekly to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Class topics derived from students' field experience will focus on language issues in interpretation, ethical decision making, application of the Code of Professional Conduct, making interpretation choices, and implementing successful business practices as a professional interpreter. Students will maintain an electronic portfolio showcasing their knowledge and skills learned from the interpreting program. (Prerequisites: INTP-350 and INTP-435 and INTP-436 or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of C. This course is restricted to students with at least a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Co-requisite: INTP-455 or equivalent course.) Seminar 2 (Fall, Spring).
2
INTP-460
Issues in Interpreting (WI-PR)
This capstone course offers students an opportunity to integrate content areas in the program curriculum and investigate current issues and controversies in the field of interpreting. The course content and activities will vary depending on current issues, literature developments, and students’ interests, but students will be given guiding research tools through research development with a critical approach to interpreting-related issues. (Prerequisites: INTP-335 and INTP-336 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Open Elective
3
 
Professional Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2,3
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
123

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) refers to writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking a 4-credit hour lab science course. Students may select one of the lab science courses listed below to fulfill this requirement. Both the lecture and the laboratory sections must be taken. Human Biology I (MEDG-101) and Human Biology Lab I (MEDG-103), Human Biology II (MEDG-102) and Human Biology Lab II (MEDG-104), Field Biology (BIOG-110), General Biology I (BIOL-101) and General Biology Lab I (BIOL-103), General Biology II (BIOL-102) and General Biology Lab II (BIOL-104), Introductory Biology I (BIOL-121), Introductory Biology II (BIOL-122), General-Organic-Biochemistry I (CHMG-111), College Physics I (PHYS-111), College Physics II (PHYS-112).

 

† Deaf Cultural Courses 

ENGL-417
Deaf Literature
The major focus of this course is on the image of the deaf and the deaf experience as depicted in literature. The course attempts to define deafness and the cultural roles it plays in both texts by deaf authors and texts about deaf persons, as well as to examine particular literary forms related to the deaf experience. Thus, attention is also given to studying ASL poetry. (Prerequisites: Completion of First Year Writing (FYW) requirement is required prior to enrolling in this class.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
HIST-230
American Deaf History
This course explores the history of the deaf community in the United States. It offers a broad survey of American deaf history from the early 19th century to the late 20th century. Major events in American deaf history will be considered, including the foundation of schools for the deaf, the birth of American Sign Language, the emergence of deaf culture, the challenge of oralism, the threat of eugenics, and the fight for civil rights. Lecture 3 (Spring).
HIST-231
Deaf People in Global Perspective
This course explores the history of the deaf community in global perspective from the 18th to the 20th century. It takes a comparative approach, exploring the histories of deaf people from around the globe, including deaf lives in Central America, Europe, Africa, and East Asia. Special attention will be given to the major events in European deaf history, as Europe was the site for the first schools for the deaf in the history of the world, and the world's first documented deaf culture, in France, emerged there as well. The spread of deaf education, the rise of indigenous signed languages, the birth of deaf-hood, and the fight for human rights will all be placed in a global context. Lecture 3 (Fall).
HIST-330
Deafness and Technology
The deaf community has a long and complicated relationship with technological devices. The deaf community, for instance, was quick to embrace the new technology of moving pictures, and many deaf actors found work in early Hollywood during the silent film era. Most lost their livelihoods when sound was introduced to motion pictures. Deaf people were left out of the communication revolution brought about by the telephone for many years, but now the deaf community is increasingly a wired community, as texting, tweeting, and vlogging makes more communication technologies accessible to deaf users. This course will explore the historical relationship between technology and deafness. It will consider how views of deafness frequently shape technology, that is, if deafness is viewed as a pathological illness, technologies are focused on curing it (e.g., cochlear implants), whereas, if deaf people are viewed as members of linguistic and cultural minority, technologies are harnessed to make it easier for that minority to interact with the majority culture (e.g, relay systems). This course will consider how deaf people have historically used, created, and adopted technologies to their own ends. Lecture 3 (Spring).
HIST-333
Diversity in the Deaf Community
Students in this course will be introduced to the historical study of diversity in the Deaf community, especially as it relates to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, disability, and sexuality. Students will learn to analyze the implications of such diversity in terms of the social perception of deaf people, the history of the education of deaf people, and the experience of acculturation for and as Deaf people. The course will examine how the process of acculturation has operated, historically, within the Deaf community. Deaf culture has sought to transcend various differences and to bond members of the Deaf community together, in one, larger Deaf identity. But has this always been achieved? How has the Deaf community handled issues of diversity in different historical moments? Has the history of diversity within the Deaf community been similar to the history of diversity within the hearing community? Or have there been distinctively Deaf ways of diversity in history? This course will invite students to compare and contrast the history of difference and diversity in the deaf and hearing communities, and to explore those historical moments of intersection and interaction as well. Lecture 3 (Fall).
HIST-335
Women and the Deaf Community
Deaf history, as a field, has often neglected the story of deaf women. Scholar Arlene B. Kelly has recently asked, Where is deaf herstory? This course seeks to correct that gender imbalance in deaf history. We will study deaf women's history. This will include a consideration of deaf-blind women, as well, as women like Helen Keller were often the most famous deaf women of their era. But this course also seeks to look at the role of hearing women in deaf history. Hearing women dominated the field of deaf education in the late nineteenth century. They had a tremendous impact on the lives of deaf children and the events of deaf educational history. Hearing women were also important figures in deaf history as mothers. As mothers of deaf children, hearing women were frequently asked to behave as teachers in the home. Their embrace of this role often led them to endorse oral education, and oppose the sign language. Hearing mothers in this way were pitted against their adult deaf daughters, who frequently went on to learn sign language against their mothers' wishes. The historically complex relationship between women and the deaf community will be explored in this course. Lecture 3 (Biannual).
LEAD-203
Foundation of Dialogue: Black Deaf Experiences
A leader’s ability to facilitate understanding, inclusion, and resolution is key to leading a group to success. Honoring and valuing Black and Black Deaf people’s experiences are critical to creating an inclusive, empowering and effective work group. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students may apply knowledge gained through dialogue and readings to lead agencies and organizations to inclusive change. Students will also explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences through readings, journals, leading a dialogue and a final written paper. (Prerequisite: LEAD-200 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-305
International Deaf Leadership and Community Development
The challenges and opportunities for deaf community development vary from one country to another. This course focuses on the skills and best practices for deaf community leaders to implement in their countries of origin. Students will be introduced to international laws that support deaf and their communities. The achievements of past and current international deaf community leaders will be studied and used as a model for identifying the needs of communities and mobilizing community action. This course is designed for international and domestic students who are committed to making positive organizational changes. (Prerequisites: LEAD-306 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-306
Leadership in the Deaf Community
This course will introduce historical and current issues regarding leadership and the Deaf/Hard of Hearing (D/HH) community. Students will learn about D/HH leaders in the Deaf community over the years, examine movements that have impacted the lives of D/HH individuals, and finally, learn about influential organizations of, by, and for D/HH individuals. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
LEAD-311
Dialogue: Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, Hard-of-Hearing
A history of the Deaf, Deafblind, DeafDisabled and Hard-of-Hearing communities and their relationship with the American society will be discussed. This course will challenge students to apply group skills by engaging in discussion about critical and contemporary issues experienced by deaf, deafblind, deafdisabled, or hard-of-hearing communities to facilitate understanding and resolution between members of diverse work groups. During classroom dialogue, students will actively participate in structured discussions with students and learn from each other’s perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore avenues to resolution. Students will also use readings, journals, discussions, and a final reflection paper to explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences. (Prerequisites: LEAD-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall or Spring).
MLAS-352 
American Sign Language Literature
In this course, students will explore a wide range of literary works representing the various genres of ASL literature. Students will be expected to analyze works in terms of literary conventions/techniques as well as relevant cultural symbols and themes. Attention will be given to historical context, Deaf cultural values, and the style/conventions used by individual literary artists. Each student will be required to complete literary analysis papers. In addition, students will be expected to create original ASL literary works and/or retell well-known ASL literary works as individuals or in collaboration with other students. This course is requires fluency in ASL, as instruction is conducted in ASL, without an interpreter, and will require considerable reading and viewing of videotaped materials. Seminar (Fall).
NHSS-251
Deaf Cultural and Contemporary Civilizations
This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of contemporary civilization and how it affects Deaf people’s lives. Students will learn key influences and develop an understanding of their impact on Deaf people via the topics of language, psychology, history, bioethics and human rights. Students will study a variety of social and cultural groups in order to understand the value of Deaf people in contemporary civilization. (Students in AOS or CARPRP-UND are not eligible to take this course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
NHSS-275
Visual Expressions of Deaf Culture
This course introduces students to Deaf Cultural Studies using stories about the Deaf experience. Students will interpret works in visual art, film, performing arts, and literature (ASL and English). Students will learn how historical/social/political and intersectional context, Deaf cultural values, and themes and symbols influence our interpretation of these creative works. Finally, the importance of collective memories for preserving Deaf cultural norms/values and promoting social justice will be addressed. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
PRFN-214 
Appreciation of Artistic Sign Language 
This course fosters the understanding and appreciation of artistic sign language for theater, film, television, and video productions. Topics considered include the relationship between script and translation, principles of artistic sign language for stage vs. film/television, integrating Deaf and hearing performance, and accessibility advocacy. Assignments include critiques of artistic sign language in various genres from the director of artistic sign language (DASL) perspective. Due to the nature of this subject, instruction is in ASL and voice interpreters will not be provided. (Prerequisites: MLAS-301 or INTP-126 or NASL-200 or equivalent course or a minimum score of 3 on the ASL placement exam.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
PRFN-314
ASL Musicality
If music is creative and artistic expression via sounds, then what is sign language music? This course explores how music can be expressed through visual equivalents of musical elements such as harmony, melody, and timbre. It also explores musicality, the emotional and artistic qualities of music, in sign language. Other topics covered include the use of sign language poetics in visual musical performance, aesthetic considerations, and the history of music by Deaf artists, ASL music videos, and musical theatre in ASL. In addition to assigned readings, students will view and analyze a wide variety of music performance in ASL with and without sound. Due to the nature of this subject, instruction is in ASL and voice interpreters will not be provided. (Prerequisites: PRFN-214 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
PRFN-413 
History of Deaf Performance
A study of Deaf performance in the United States from its earliest documented forms to the present. Topics covered include storytelling, visual vernacular, ASL poetry, ASL music, Dip Hop, principles of artistic sign language, the development of the National Theatre of the Deaf, and the history of integrated Deaf/hearing theatre. In addition to assigned readings, students will view and analyze a wide variety of Deaf performance artifacts. Due to the nature of this subject, instruction is in ASL and voice interpreters will not be provided. (Prerequisites: MLAS-301 or INTP-126 or NASL-200 or equivalent course or a minimum score of 3 on the ASL placement exam.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
PRFN-414 
Theatrical Translation
This course examines theoretical and dramaturgical issues specific to translating written English plays into ASL. Students will consider how linguistic translation of a text intended for performance is shaped by the context of its enactment and reception by the audience, as well as by the cultural, social, aesthetic, political, economic, and ethical aspects of translation. Principles of artistic sign language will be reviewed and applied by analyzing production recordings and live theater performances. Students will also translate short plays collaboratively and individually. Due to the nature of this subject, instruction is in ASL and voice interpreters will not be provided. (Prerequisites: PRFN-214 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
SOCI-240
Deaf Culture in America
This course is an introductory survey of Deaf culture in the United States. Students will study the scholarly literature pertaining to various social groups in the Deaf community and have contact with their members. This course will familiarize students with the characteristics of Deaf Culture, as well as general perceptions of the Deaf community within the dominant mainstream society. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
VISL-440
Deaf Art & Cinema
Students will examine the context in which specific cultural groups have chosen to create works about their experiences. They will go on to explore a wide range of artistic works representing the Deaf experience in visual arts and cinema. Students will be expected to analyze works in terms of cultural symbols and themes. Attention will be given to historical context (personal and collective) that has helped to shape many of these works, motifs, and messages. Students will write and present in-depth papers examining specific works and artists/filmmakers. In addition, students will be expected to create an original artwork and a collaborative short film. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).