Photography Minor

Course
Prerequisite
PHAR-160
Intro to Digital Photography
An introduction to digital photography – technical, aesthetic, conceptual – for non-photography majors. Through weekly assignments, students will become familiar with the operation of a DSLR camera body/lens, while exploring the basic principles of lighting, depth of field, design, blur/stop motion, accurate exposure, and image manipulation. Lectures will address photographic aesthetics, contemporary and historical practices, and professional applications. Students will learn to critique work through participation in discussions of photographic assignments. Students are required to have their own DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) camera. Non-photo majors only. This course maybe repeated. "Fee – There is a lab fee required for this course** (This course is open to all undergraduate students except those in PHTILL-BFA, PHIMAG-BFA , VISMED-BFA, PHIMTEC-BS, PHBM-BS and IMPT-BS.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
Required Course
PHAR-161
Intermediate Digital Photography for Non-Majors
This is the first required course for students enrolled in the photography minor. This course will reinforce and build upon the skills learned in Introduction to Digital Photography. It will emphasize aesthetics, craft, visual problem solving, skill development, and critical thinking skills. In this course, students will work in the studio and be introduced to the skills needed to use, create, and control artificial lighting as well as develop skills for modifying found light on location. Students will also make photographic prints. The curriculum will emphasize both craft and visual problem-solving skills necessary to achieve industry standards and prepare students for other courses available in the minor. Fee required for non-majors. (PHAR-160 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
Electives
Students choose an area of emphasis from below. Students must complete the required course plus three elective courses within that area. At least two elective courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
   General Photography
   Required course
    PHAR-201
      Elements of Fine Art Photography
This course will offer students an introduction to the discipline of fine art photography. Conceptually driven projects will be investigated through a variety of photographic techniques; reading, writing and discussion about the intent and meaning of photographic imagery will be emphasized. Aspects of still photography and moving imagery as artistic choices and practices will be presented. The goal of the course is to establish theoretical, aesthetic and technical strategies for the production of photographic artwork. If you are pursing the Fine Art Photography option this course is required. (Prerequisites: PHAR-102 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   Elective courses
    IMSM-301
      Imaging Systems
This course will explore the business and technology fundamentals used in imaging systems. There will be an emphasis on the operation of devices/components used to optimize imaging systems. Fundamental concepts prevalent in imaging systems such as resolution, dynamic range, sensor architectures, printer and monitor technologies, color spaces, and image processing workflows will be presented. Emphasis will be on underlying principles of these technologies, proper selection of them, and how to best apply that knowledge to solve problems in the imaging industry. Potential careers in the imaging industry will be presented throughout the course. (This course is restricted to students in the APIMGS-MN minor or IMGTSYS-MN or PHOTO-MN.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
    IMSM-302
      Color Management Technology
This course, primarily designed for photographers, will provide students with hands on experience using software and hardware fundamental to contemporary practices in the imaging industry. It has been designed to expose students to a managed color workflow beginning at capture and culminating in output. The course will explore standard color instruments and give the essential knowledge and skills required to solve problems prevalent in the photographic field. Critical problem solving of accurate color reproduction across media will be investigated. (Prerequisites: IMSM-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHAR-150
      Introduction to Film Photography
An introduction to black-and-white still photography – technical, aesthetic, conceptual – for non-photography majors. Through weekly assignments, students will become familiar with the operation of a 35mm camera body/lenses and film processing/printing, while exploring basic principles of lighting, depth of field, principles of design, blur/stop motion, accurate exposure, and tone control. Lectures will address photographic aesthetics, in addition to historical, contemporary and innovative practices. Students will engage in the language of the critique through participation in discussions of photographic shooting assignments. Students are required to provide their own 35mm camera, film and processing, and photo paper. Non-Photo majors only. **Fee: Photo fee required** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHAR-204
      Elements of Visual Media
This course will provide an introduction to the professional opportunities where the fields of photography, graphic design and print media overlap. Students will develop an understanding of the working relationships between professionals involved in each of the three career areas. Successful visual media experts require a contemporary understanding of the business practices necessary to manage the workflow, financial operations and personnel necessary for success. Students in this class will experience the breadth of interactions between these three career paths, and appreciate the management necessary in their dynamic relationships. Students pursing the Visual Media option are required to take this course. (Prerequisites: PHAR-102 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
    PHAR-211
      Histories and Aesthetics of Photography I
The objective of this course, part one of a two semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography as utilized for fine art, snapshot, documentary, scientific, commercial and propaganda purposes in a global perspective. Course lectures include the medium's pre-history and a detailed development of the camera obscura. Students will learn about many technical processes, as well as, the multiple interpretations of notable images during the period 1800-1915. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
    PHAR-212
      Histories and Aesthetics of Photography II
The objective of this course, the second course of a two-semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography from the development of Modernism to the present, including the medium's transformation by digital imaging in the 21st century. Photography's applications within fine art, documentary, scientific, journalistic, commercial and vernacular practices will be investigated within a global perspective, but primary emphasis is placed upon developments and movements within the United States and Europe. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
    PHAR-363
      Black and White Photography I
This course, the first part of a two-semester sequence, will introduce students to the exposure and development of black and white film and the procedures for making high quality black and white photographic prints in a traditional darkroom with chemicals, safe lights and enlargers. Included in this course are 35mm, medium and large-format cameras, variables in making fine black and white prints and techniques for archival and museum quality processes and methods of display. Students must have access to a film camera with adjustable exposure controls. Each student will produce a finished portfolio of black and white fine prints. (Prerequisites: PHAR-101 or PHAR-160 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
    PHAR-364
      Black and White Photography II
This course, the second course of a two-semester sequence, will introduce students to the use and manipulation of specialty analog cameras (pinhole, Holga, Hasselblad fish-eye, X-Pan, view camera, etc.) and include information and exercises using the Zone System. In addition to the hardware resources, the course will survey and demonstrate methods of making “monoprints” - one of a kind photographs using analog processes such as photogram, chemogram, wet plate ambrotype, and hand -coloring. Students will also interpret selections of work by noted photographic artists and others enrolled in the course in both critiques and written assignments. A creative portfolio of black and white prints and/or monoprints will be produced by each student. (Prerequisites: PHAR-150 or PHAR-363 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHFA-359
      The Constructed Image
This course will introduce students to the concept, theory, and practice of constructed imagery within the context of contemporary photography. Image making will be explored from creating interventions within the landscape to the manipulation of space in and out of studio spaces as a method of creating photographs. Participants will be introduced to the history of constructed imagery and the impact this working methodology has towards the contemporary dialog in photography. (Prerequisites: PHAR-201 or PHAR-202 or PHAR-203 or PHAR-204 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2, Studio 3 (Fall, Spring).
    PHFA-511
      Contemporary Issues
A study of current issues relevant to imaging-based fine art photography and related media; how they relate to broader historical/cultural issues; and how they might suggest future directions. Emphasis is placed on the integration of critical theoretical discourse and studio practice. This course is a touchstone to current and future fine art practices through its engagement with a variety of subjects. This course can be taken multiple times but individual topics must be different. (Prerequisites: PHAR-201 or PHAR-202 or PHAR-203 or PHAR-204 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
    PHFA-565
      Color Photography Seminar
This course is a creative exploration of the hybrid technology between traditional film-based color photography and digital imaging. Students will use film and progress through analog to digital conversion. Proper scanning techniques, information on proper color management and procedures for digital image editing and manipulation will be outlined. Various methods of printed output will be discussed and explored. Students will conceive and design their own photographic project and produce a portfolio of prints. (Prerequisites: PHAR-201 or PHAR-202 or PHAR-203 or PHAR-204 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
    PHFA-576
      Preservation Care of Photographs
This course will expose students to the field of photographic conservation and professional practices. Even in the digital era, millions of film and paper images are in greater need of preservation and conservation than at any point in history. This course will be co-listed with graduate students also interested in this topic. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
    SOFA-127
      Digital Filmmaking
Digital video is currently used in many fields. This course will teach the basic digital filmmaking skills (camera, editing, and sound) with an emphasis on storytelling skills using motion media. Students will work in small groups shooting and editing various projects in fiction, documentary, and experimental genres. Non-majors will be required to pay a facilities fee. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
   Fine Art Photography
   Required course
    PHAR-201
      Elements of Fine Art Photography
This course will offer students an introduction to the discipline of fine art photography. Conceptually driven projects will be investigated through a variety of photographic techniques; reading, writing and discussion about the intent and meaning of photographic imagery will be emphasized. Aspects of still photography and moving imagery as artistic choices and practices will be presented. The goal of the course is to establish theoretical, aesthetic and technical strategies for the production of photographic artwork. If you are pursing the Fine Art Photography option this course is required. (Prerequisites: PHAR-102 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   Elective courses
    PHAR-150
      Introduction to Film Photography
An introduction to black-and-white still photography – technical, aesthetic, conceptual – for non-photography majors. Through weekly assignments, students will become familiar with the operation of a 35mm camera body/lenses and film processing/printing, while exploring basic principles of lighting, depth of field, principles of design, blur/stop motion, accurate exposure, and tone control. Lectures will address photographic aesthetics, in addition to historical, contemporary and innovative practices. Students will engage in the language of the critique through participation in discussions of photographic shooting assignments. Students are required to provide their own 35mm camera, film and processing, and photo paper. Non-Photo majors only. **Fee: Photo fee required** (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHAR-211
      Histories and Aesthetics of Photography I
The objective of this course, part one of a two semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography as utilized for fine art, snapshot, documentary, scientific, commercial and propaganda purposes in a global perspective. Course lectures include the medium's pre-history and a detailed development of the camera obscura. Students will learn about many technical processes, as well as, the multiple interpretations of notable images during the period 1800-1915. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
    PHAR-212
      Histories and Aesthetics of Photography II
The objective of this course, the second course of a two-semester sequence, is to present an overview of the multiple, intersecting histories and aesthetic practices of photography from the development of Modernism to the present, including the medium's transformation by digital imaging in the 21st century. Photography's applications within fine art, documentary, scientific, journalistic, commercial and vernacular practices will be investigated within a global perspective, but primary emphasis is placed upon developments and movements within the United States and Europe. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
    PHAR-363
      Black and White Photography I
This course, the first part of a two-semester sequence, will introduce students to the exposure and development of black and white film and the procedures for making high quality black and white photographic prints in a traditional darkroom with chemicals, safe lights and enlargers. Included in this course are 35mm, medium and large-format cameras, variables in making fine black and white prints and techniques for archival and museum quality processes and methods of display. Students must have access to a film camera with adjustable exposure controls. Each student will produce a finished portfolio of black and white fine prints. (Prerequisites: PHAR-101 or PHAR-160 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
    PHAR-364
      Black and White Photography II
This course, the second course of a two-semester sequence, will introduce students to the use and manipulation of specialty analog cameras (pinhole, Holga, Hasselblad fish-eye, X-Pan, view camera, etc.) and include information and exercises using the Zone System. In addition to the hardware resources, the course will survey and demonstrate methods of making “monoprints” - one of a kind photographs using analog processes such as photogram, chemogram, wet plate ambrotype, and hand -coloring. Students will also interpret selections of work by noted photographic artists and others enrolled in the course in both critiques and written assignments. A creative portfolio of black and white prints and/or monoprints will be produced by each student. (Prerequisites: PHAR-150 or PHAR-363 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHFA-359
      The Constructed Image
This course will introduce students to the concept, theory, and practice of constructed imagery within the context of contemporary photography. Image making will be explored from creating interventions within the landscape to the manipulation of space in and out of studio spaces as a method of creating photographs. Participants will be introduced to the history of constructed imagery and the impact this working methodology has towards the contemporary dialog in photography. (Prerequisites: PHAR-201 or PHAR-202 or PHAR-203 or PHAR-204 or equivalent course.) Lecture 2, Studio 3 (Fall, Spring).
    PHFA-511
      Contemporary Issues
A study of current issues relevant to imaging-based fine art photography and related media; how they relate to broader historical/cultural issues; and how they might suggest future directions. Emphasis is placed on the integration of critical theoretical discourse and studio practice. This course is a touchstone to current and future fine art practices through its engagement with a variety of subjects. This course can be taken multiple times but individual topics must be different. (Prerequisites: PHAR-201 or PHAR-202 or PHAR-203 or PHAR-204 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
    PHFA-565
      Color Photography Seminar
This course is a creative exploration of the hybrid technology between traditional film-based color photography and digital imaging. Students will use film and progress through analog to digital conversion. Proper scanning techniques, information on proper color management and procedures for digital image editing and manipulation will be outlined. Various methods of printed output will be discussed and explored. Students will conceive and design their own photographic project and produce a portfolio of prints. (Prerequisites: PHAR-201 or PHAR-202 or PHAR-203 or PHAR-204 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
    PHFA-576
      Preservation Care of Photographs
This course will expose students to the field of photographic conservation and professional practices. Even in the digital era, millions of film and paper images are in greater need of preservation and conservation than at any point in history. This course will be co-listed with graduate students also interested in this topic. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
    SOFA-127
      Digital Filmmaking
Digital video is currently used in many fields. This course will teach the basic digital filmmaking skills (camera, editing, and sound) with an emphasis on storytelling skills using motion media. Students will work in small groups shooting and editing various projects in fiction, documentary, and experimental genres. Non-majors will be required to pay a facilities fee. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
   Photojournalism
   Required course
    PHAR-203
      Elements of Photojournalism
This course will serve an introduction to visual story telling as it relates to professional photojournalism. It will provide relevant practice in basic technical, compositional and interpersonal skills necessary in all aspects of modern photography. Students will be exposed to photojournalism - documentary, editorial, narrative and editing - as well as explorations of current career possibilities. Lectures, critiques, demonstrations and assignments will provide participants the opportunity to explore the still, audio, and multimedia strategies used for story telling in this era. Students will be expected to meet tight project deadlines and participate in both class discussions, critiques and practices required to be successful in this field. If you are pursuing the Photojournalism option this course is required. (Prerequisites: PHAR-102 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   Elective courses
    PHPJ-302
      Photojournalism I
This course will explore the use of the photographic image in narrative, documentary and editorial form. There will be an emphasis on publication, public need and independent projects. Lectures, critiques, demonstrations and assignments will provide participants the opportunity to explore the still, audio, video, and multimedia aspects of story telling. Students will be expected to meet project deadlines and participate in both class discussions and critiques. (Prerequisites: PHAR-203 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHPJ-306
      Picture Editing I
This course focuses on image selection, usage and design. Using images from a variety of sources, we discuss picture selection relative to context and desired impact in print and online. Effective use of images for a variety of story applications are discussed. Design techniques that maximize impact and storytelling are investigated, including scaling, proportion, sequencing, visual variety and sizing. Students will design a number of assignments from single pages to multi-page essays of varying length. Students will design a number of single pages to multi-page essays for various publishing and storytelling platforms that include print, online, and mobile delivery. (Prerequisites: PHAR-201 or PHAR-202 or PHAR-203 or PHAR-204 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHPJ-307
      Ethics and Law
This course will introduce students to the principles and theories of ethics and their application to editorial photography and photojournalism for mass communications. It will establish a basic understanding of philosophical ethics, social responsibility, and professional practices within protections and responsibilities of the First Amendment. The course will also review the legal issues relating to photographic practices and access to subjects. The course will examine a wide range of case examples used in classroom discussion and analysis to build a foundation for professional practice. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
    PHPJ-315
      Non-Fiction Multimedia
This course will teach students how to tell stories in the digital world. Students will learn the skills necessary to gather and edit audio and how to combine audio, images, and text for compelling online storytelling. In addition to basic technical skills, the course will explore contemporary concepts for effective multimedia storytelling. (Prerequisites: PHAR-203 or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
    PHPJ-356
      Alternate Influences
This course introduces students to a wide range of disciplines that influence image making. Students will develop a new vocabulary for discussing their own work as well as the work of those who came before them. They will develop a respect, through knowledge and experience, for practitioners of other aesthetic disciplines - artistic, cultural, and others - with regards to photography and, specifically, photojournalism. Students will explore various forms of literary, cinematic, poetic, and lyrical storytelling as influences on photojournalism. (Prerequisites: PHAR-203 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
    PHPJ-455
      Advanced Non-Fiction Multimedia
This course will provide students with advanced multimedia techniques and introduces photographers to storytelling and reporting using still cameras with video and sound capture features. Students will research and produce multimedia work in class. (Prerequisites: PHPJ-315 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
    PHPJ-476
      Picture Editing II
Picture Editing II is an advanced course designed for students to develop and express creative ideas, shape visual texts, and convey stories, concepts, and viewpoints through the understanding of image sequencing, and layout. Using images from a variety of sources, we discuss how to use images effectively in a variety of story applications and media. This course also emphasizes project management and managing assignments, photographers and editors. This is a non-shooting course, and students will work with existing professional images to develop visual narratives and essays in a variety of media. Students will study market segmentation, new audiences, new forms of content delivery, and other consequences associated with rapid changes in technology. Consideration is given to ongoing changes in professional photographic practice. Students will develop strategies for working in a professional environment. (Prerequisites: PHPJ-306 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
   Photo Sciences
   Required course–Choose one of the following:
    PHPS-201
      Scientific Photography I
The first course of a two-semester sequence that will develop photographic skills and approaches required in scientific photography. The course will develop scientific methods required for standardized imaging. Appropriate subjects including contact lenses, rice grains and other challenging, nearly invisible objects will be explored. Students will investigate unique illumination techniques in order to reveal a subject’s unusual characteristics. Techniques including polarized light and fluorescence reveal what cannot easily be observed without specialized photographic imaging and image processing. In addition, the course will expose students to ethical problems encountered in scientific imaging including managing and processing digital data. (Prerequisites: PHPS-102 or PHAR-102 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHPS-202
      Scientific Photography II
This is the second course in a two-semester sequence that explores new and different photographic skills and methods useful in scientific photography not covered in Scientific Photography I. Appropriate subjects will be explored in each of the various assignments designed to develop methods used in various scientific applications. Students will investigate new ways to reveal a subject's characteristics such as imaging with ultraviolet and infrared revealing what cannot be observed without photographic imaging and image processing. The course will expose students to the processes required to produce scientific research as well as scientific posters. (Prerequisites: PHPS-201 or PHAR-102 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
   Elective courses
    IMSM-301
      Imaging Systems
This course will explore the business and technology fundamentals used in imaging systems. There will be an emphasis on the operation of devices/components used to optimize imaging systems. Fundamental concepts prevalent in imaging systems such as resolution, dynamic range, sensor architectures, printer and monitor technologies, color spaces, and image processing workflows will be presented. Emphasis will be on underlying principles of these technologies, proper selection of them, and how to best apply that knowledge to solve problems in the imaging industry. Potential careers in the imaging industry will be presented throughout the course. (This course is restricted to students in the APIMGS-MN minor or IMGTSYS-MN or PHOTO-MN.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
    IMSM-302
      Color Management Technology
This course, primarily designed for photographers, will provide students with hands on experience using software and hardware fundamental to contemporary practices in the imaging industry. It has been designed to expose students to a managed color workflow beginning at capture and culminating in output. The course will explore standard color instruments and give the essential knowledge and skills required to solve problems prevalent in the photographic field. Critical problem solving of accurate color reproduction across media will be investigated. (Prerequisites: IMSM-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHPS-106
      Photographic Technology I
This course is part of a two-course sequence that explores the technology of photography. The photographic technology course demonstrates the application of physics, mathematics and optical science behind the technology of image making. The course also provides the students with the opportunity to employ statistical data analysis to identify trends through laboratory exercises utilizing principles of scientific inquiry. Among the topics explored are the optics and physics of image formation, lens evaluation, light sources, digital light-sensitive materials, digital workflows, variability, quality control and photographic effects. Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHPS-107
      Photographic Technology II
This is the second course in a two-semester course based in the study of the technology of photography, with emphasis on applications to real world photographic problems. Among the topics studied will include color vision, Munsell color system, CIELAB system, color theory, color management, digital color balance during post-processing, digital tone reproduction, and digital workflows. (Prerequisite: PHPS-106 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHPS-277
      Survey of Non-Conventional Imaging
This course will provide an overview of imaging methods and imaging systems including principles of photographic surveying, mapping photogrammetry and aerial photography, photofinish photography, panoramic photography, peripheral photography, scanning imaging, infrared/ultraviolet photography, three-dimensional imaging including lenticular photography and alternative imaging such as schlieren, thermography, electrophotography and other specialized applications. Topics may vary from year to year allowing for the introduction of newly developing applications and systems. Lecture 3 (Spring).
    PHPS-529
      High Speed Photography
This course will investigate the theory and applications of photographic systems designed to record events of very short duration. The images will be analyzed to gain a more complete understanding of short duration events. Included in the course will be comparisons of the characteristics of digital video cameras, sequencing and timing control devices, as well as time magnification relationships. Synchronization systems and timing controls and high-speed flash and stroboscopic systems will also be covered in some detail. Introduction to high-speed video recording as well as the introduction to shadowgraph and schlieren imaging systems will be included. Students will be introduced to programmable microprocessors of the Arduino type for control of high-speed photographic equipment and will gain experiences in the operation of equipment as well as proper planning, setup and basic data reduction techniques. (Prerequisites: PHPS-202 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHPS-539
      Photographic Instrumentation
With the advancement of photographic technologies coinciding with an increased maker movement, the potential to create or modify photographic instrumentation for specific purposes has never been greater. This course will provide students with hands on experience in designing, testing and building devices for use in technical photographic applications. Students will gain experience by extracting data from images and/or using images as a source of measurement. Projects will change each semester, but examples might include using microprocessors to control cameras, the creation of high-speed infrared triggering systems, or the building dedicated specialized LED light systems for use in the infrared or ultraviolet imaging. (Prerequisites: PHPS-202 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHPS-541
      High Magnified Imaging I
This course will introduce students to specialized camera and illumination techniques required to produce photographs of the unseen world. Images will be made in the magnification range of 1:1 – 20:1 (at capture) using various types of cameras. Lighting, applied optics, subject management techniques as well as extended depth of field methods will be evaluated in theory and practice. The course content will include the use of software to improve images. (Prerequisites: PHPS-202 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHPS-542
      High Magnified Imaging II
The microscope has proven itself to be an important tool for investigation since its invention in 1595. This course is designed to go well beyond the basics required for the creation of magnified images of objects too small to be seen with the naked eye. Students will compare a variety of microscopy techniques including differential interference contrast, fluorescence, phase contrast, reflected light and polarized light. The course will investigate both the optical and digital enhancement techniques made possible in contemporary times. Video, motion-stopping using electronic flash as well as specimen preparation will be part of the coursework and students will be able to devise appropriate photomicrographic approaches based upon the data and research goals of the images. (Prerequisites: PHPS-202 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
    PHPS-546
      Ophthalmic Imaging I
This is the first of a two courses designed to investigate proper patient management and camera/photographic techniques required in contemporary ophthalmic photography and imaging. Diagnostic evaluation of ocular anatomy and physiology utilizing special cameras/equipment is examined and practiced. In addition to retinal fundus photography, students will demonstrate diagnostic medical imaging techniques such as fluorescein angiography, fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Retinal disease processes and recognition will also be combined with a working knowledge of ocular anatomy and physiology. (Prerequisites: PHPS-202 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
    PHPS-563
      Forensic Photography
Proper documentation of crime scenes and evidence is extremely important in the investigation of crimes by police agencies and forensic labs. This course will provide hands-on experience documenting crime scenes and related evidence. Students will learn how to prepare images for presentation in court. Topics covered will include crime scene management, evidence handling, crime scene documentation, general evidence documentation, photographic techniques for the enhancement of evidence, and court display preparation. This is a blended course, with lectures delivered online and two in-person Saturday lab sessions. (Prerequisites: PHPS-102 or PHAR-102 or PHAR-161 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).