New Media Design Bachelor of fine arts degree

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Overview

At the intersection of visual communication, design strategy, technology, and user experience design, new media designers are the innovative thinkers, designers, and creators of the next generation of digital media.


Millions of people interact with digital devices every day. This digital design degree lets you explore the many aspects of digital design, giving you the skills needed to create ingenious work. Our student-centered curriculum, skilled faculty, and up-to-date facilities prepare you for a dynamic career in this field.

The new media design major is for students who are fascinated by visual design, user experience design, interactivity, motion graphics, and technology. Students learn the skills required to meet the demands of new media, web design, and mobile app marketplaces. Courses, projects, and explorations allow students to create user-centered solutions that leverage new opportunities in visual design, communication, and user experiences across a full spectrum of digital products and interfaces.

A balance of visual design foundations, information design, user interface design, user experience design, 3D modeling, motion graphics, usability research, and programming create the skilled background needed to design cutting edge interactive solutions from mobile to fully immersive digital environments. Collaborations with students from RIT’s new media interactive development major (housed in the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences), as well as other majors and corporate clients, provide teamwork experience and leverage the designer-programmer-client relationship. Students are well-positioned for careers in visual, interactive, and user experience design for digital advertising, marketing, mobile, web application, entertainment, and corporate design.

Industries


  • Design

  • Internet and Software

  • Advertising, PR, and Marketing

  • Health Care

  • Movies, TV, and Music

Typical Job Titles

Art Director User Experience Designer
Associate Web Developer Content Design Analyst
Experience Designer Interaction Designer
Junior Motion Graphics Designer Junior Designer
Motion Designer and Video Editor Product Designer

91%

outcome rate of graduates

$67.5k

median first-year salary of graduates

Featured Work

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Curriculum

New Media Design, BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NMDE-103
New Media Design Interactive I
This course provides an introduction to key internet, web and multimedia technologies. Topics covered include computer-based communication and information, basic HTML, Adobe Flash and WYSIWYG editors, basic internet applications such as FTP, basic use of digital images, audio and video techniques, web page design, web animation for development and publishing.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop: Topics
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
FDTN-121
2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
NMDE-111
New Media Design Digital Survey I
This project-based course is an investigation of the computer as an illustrative, imaging, and graphical generation tool. It develops foundational design skills in raster and vector image creation, editing, compositing, layout and visual design for online production. Emphasis will be on the application of visual design organization methods and principles for electronic media. Students will create and edit images, graphics, layouts and typography to form effective design solutions for online delivery.
3
NMDE-112
New Media Design Digital Survey II
Through formal studies and perceptual understanding, including aesthetics, graphic form, structure, concept development, visual organization methods and interaction principles, students will design graphical solutions to communication problems for static and interactive projects. Students will focus on creating appropriate and usable design systems through the successful application of design theory and best practices. Assignments exploring aspects of graphic imagery, typography, usability and production for multiple digital devices and formats will be included.
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
0
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
IGME-101
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving I
This course provides students with an introduction to problem solving, abstraction, and algorithmic thinking that is relevant across the field of new media. Students are introduced to object-oriented design methodologies through the creation of event-driven, media-intensive applications. Students will explore the development of software through the use of a range of algorithmic concepts related to the creation of applications by writing classes that employ the fundamental structures of computing, such as conditionals, loops, variables, data types, functions, and parameters. There is an early emphasis on object oriented concepts and design.
4
IGME-102
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving II
This course provides students a continued introduction to problem solving, abstraction, and algorithmic thinking that is relevant across the field of new media. As the second course in programming for new media students, this course continues an object-oriented approach to programming for creative practice. Topics will include re-usability, data structures, rich media types, event-driven programming, loaders, XML, object design, and inheritance. Emphasis is placed on the development of problem-solving skills as students develop moderately complex applications.
4
NMDE-201
New Media Design Elements II
Information design for static, dynamic and interactive multimedia integrates content with visual indicators. Legibility and clear communication of information and direction is important to the success of any user interface design. This course integrates imagery, type, icons, actions, color, visual hierarchy, and information architecture as a foundation to design successful interactive experiences.
3
NMDE-202
New Media Design 3D
A comprehensive course in visualization that extends previous experience and skills to include three-dimensional creation and design. The course will provide studies in 3D modeling, rendering and animation for use in virtual spaces, rich internet and mobile applications as well as motion graphic design. Digital 3D tools will be used for solving visual design and communication problems. Students will be expected to show evidence of growth in 3D asset creation and usage in the form of simple product renderings, interactive integration and story based animation.
3
NMDE-203
New Media Design Interactive II
This course extends previous interactive design and development experience and skills to emphasize interactive design principles and development. The emphasis in this course will be on the creative process of planning and implementing an interactive project across multiple platforms. Students will concentrate on information architecture, interactive design, conceptual creation, digital assets, visual design and programming for interactions.
3
NMDE-204
New Media Design Animation
This project-based course provides training and practical experience in producing two- and three-dimensional animated sequences using off the shelf multimedia software. Students produce a number of short exercises incorporating original computer and non-digital artwork. Topics include key frame and tweening, cycling, acceleration, squash and stretch, backgrounds, inking, rotoscoping, sound, masking, multi-plane effects and space-to-time. Screenings of professionally made films will illustrate and provide historical perspective.
3
 
CAD Studio Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Third Year
NMDE-305
New Media Design Motion Graphics
This course will deal with design concepts related to moving type. The impact of type as it moves, rotates, explodes, scales and fades will be considered. Legibility of the message will be studied in relation to delivery methods. Additional compositing, three-dimensional, camera tracking and special techniques and effects will be introduced during the class.
3
NMDE-302
New Media Design Graphical User Interface
This course examines the user-centered and iterative design approaches to application and interactive development with a focus on interface design, testing and development across multiple devices. Students will research and investigate human factors, visual metaphors and prototype development to create effective and cutting edge user interfaces.
3
NMDE-301
New Media Design Elements III (WI)
This course focuses on advanced visual communication within the current new media design profession. Through formal studies and perceptual understanding, including aesthetics, graphic form and structure, concept development and visual organization methods, students will design sophisticated solutions to communication problems. This course integrates imagery, typography, icons, user interface design, content creation and information architecture in order to design successful static, motion and interactive experiences.
3
NMDE-303
New Media Design Interactive III
A study of the application of information design theory and practice to the developing area of new media. Cartography and iconography will be viewed in the context of web and kiosk use. The delivery of consumer information, using interactive and dynamic media as the vehicle, will be investigated.
3
 
Art History Electives†
6
 
Free Electives
6
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
 
Professional Elective
3
Fourth Year
NMDE-401
New Media Design Capstone I
This course will focus on individual career preparation through topics such as resume development, job research, interviewing best practices, and creating or refining an online portfolio. Additional exploration and overviews will include the business aspects, practices, and workflows of the new media industry with a focus on designer/developer/client relationships. Students will integrate project workflows, management, team building, concept generation and prototyping through small team projects, and project research for NMD Capstone II.
3
NMDE-404
New Media Design Interactive IV
Students will create innovative interactive product promotions and installations. The projects created in the class will embrace new technolgy and will focus on innovative solutions for real world design problems. An emphasis will be placed on researching new technology and using it in conjunction with solid interactive design skills to create innovative projects.
3
NMDE-411
New Media Design Capstone II
This course will engage the New Media Design and related majors in a capstone production experience. The instructor will form collaborative student teams that will design, plan, prototype, and implement new media projects. Student teams will test their product with users and provide written feedback and analysis. Students will be evaluated on individual contributions and their team’s final capstone project.
3
NMDE-406
New Media Design Experimental
This project-based course affords the student the ability to apply an experimental approach to integrating digitally generated content with new media techniques and processes in new, imaginative ways. Students will be encouraged to approach the computer as a medium of creativity to explore issues of narrative, identity, place, and visual reality vs. digital reality. Students will exhibit completed projects in a virtual or public forum. This course is topic based and can be taken multiple times for credit. Specific topics can only be taken once. The topics will include advanced concepts in 3D, UX, digital art and interaction design.
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
LAS Elective 
3
 
Free Electives
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
122

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Art History electives are non-studio courses offered in CAD or in COLA that are coded in SIS with the Art History attribute of ARTH.

‡ CAD Studio Elective courses are those designated with studio/lab hours listed in the course description.

§ Professional Elective courses are any course offered by the following disciplines: GRDE, IGME, ISTE, IDDE, DDDD, SOFA, or photography (PHAP, PHAR, PHFA, PHPJ, PHVM, PHPS).

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

• Studio art experience and a portfolio of original artwork are required for all programs in the schools of Art and Design. A portfolio must be submitted. View Portfolio Requirements for more information. 

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in studio art, art history, and liberal arts. A portfolio of original artwork is required to determine admissions, studio art credit, and year level in the program. View Portfolio Requirements for more information.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

Related programs or studio art experience in desired disciplines. A portfolio of original artwork is required to determine admissions, studio art credit, and year level in the program. View Portfolio Requirements for more information. Summer courses can lead to third-year status in most programs.

Learn about admissions and financial aid 

Additional Info

Professional memberships

The school maintains memberships in a variety of professional organizations, including Industrial Designers Society of America, ACM Siggraph, Society of Environmental Graphic Designers, American Society of Interior Designers, American Institute of Architects, ICOGRADA, American Institute of Graphic Arts, and International Interior Design Association.