New Media Interactive Development Bachelor of science degree

4509a506-e067-4aa1-b66d-3ed49ac9e6ce | 6219192

Overview

A degree in interactive media adapts digital technologies for social software, wearable devices, touch interfaces, virtual/augmented reality, the internet, and more.


The field of new media explores new and evolving digital technologies—the internet, social software, hand-held and wearable devices, touch and gestural interfaces, the Internet of Things, virtual reality, augmented reality, and more—to create interactive and engaging digital experiences.

In the new media interactive development major, you’ll learn the programming and computing skills for multiple interfaces, as well as the interactive design skills needed to create outstanding user interaction. You can focus your studies on a specific area of new media to truly explore your interests and adapt your skills to a range of emerging technologies.

What is new media?

 

New media is an ever-changing form of digital communication that engages, immerses, and often entertains users.

The term new media was first coined in the mid-80s to refer to the impact computing was beginning to have on traditional forms of media, like newspapers, radio, and television. But as digital platforms began to evolve beyond the internet, new media came to encompass all types of information and entertainment accessed by our computers, phones, and tablets. New media now encompasses anything that integrates communication, computing, and technology – from social media networks (Facebook, Instagram) and music and television streaming services (Spotify, Hulu, Amazon Prime), to highly interactive digital technologies like wearables (Apple Watch, FitBit), virtual reality, augmented reality, and gaming.

A Dynamic Degree for Interactive Media Design  

In the new media interactive development degree, your course work is concentrated on programming and interactive development with in depth classes on topics such as mobile development and alternative interfaces, website design and implementation, physical/wearable computing, game design, game development, design and media production, interactive audio, and more. You’ll build professional-quality web sites, apps for mobile devices and tablets, and create social networking applications that connect people with technology and each other. You’ll learn to program using current and emerging technologies for interactive web design, touchscreens, wearables, and interactive objects in a digital environment. In addition, course work in design principles will make the interactive experiences you build look polished and captivating. Two blocks of cooperative education experience gives you full-time, paid experience working in industry.

Compelling interactive design requires collaboration with designers. As a new media interactive development student, you’ll benefit from a close partnership with students in RIT’s new media design major, which focuses heavily on the design aspect of interactive media. Courses in this program address interactive media design from a design perspective and emphasize visual communication, 2D and 4D design, animation, and design strategy. Both programs share core courses in programming and design, enabling students in both majors to develop the complimentary skill sets needed for success in the industry.

Your senior year concludes with New Media Design Capstone I and II, a two-course, two-semester capstone project in which you’ll team up with students from the new media interactive development major to work on a project for a corporate client looking for a solution to a digital challenge their organization faces. You’ll gain the teamwork experience needed as you learn to develop, navigate, and leverage the designer-programmer-client relationship. With many courses both project- and team-based, you’ll build a robust portfolio of interactive projects, positioning you well to showcase your skills, capabilities, and knowledge to prospective employers upon graduation. View samples of new media team projects to see what our teams have created.

Interested in seeing what our students can do in interaction design? View a collection of student work in the IGM Gallery.

Careers in Interactive Design

Interaction designers are in demand. All kinds of companies and organizations seek out interaction designers for a range of positions in which an organization needs dynamic and innovative digital experiences and creative design solutions.  

A sampling of companies that have hired graduates of RIT’s new media interactive development major includes American Greetings, Bottomline Technologies, Fidelity Investments, Forbes Media, GeekHive, IBM, JPMorgan Chase & Co, LenelS2, M&T Bank, MassMutual, Southwest Airlines, TD Bank, and Wegmans Food Markets.

Industries


  • Advertising, PR, and Marketing

  • Commercial Banking and Credit

  • Food and Beverage

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

  • Higher Education

  • Internet and Software

  • Investment Banking

  • Non-Profit

Typical Job Titles

Interactive Developer​ User Experience (UX) Developer
Front-end Web Developer Mobile Developer
Full-stack Engineer Creative Coder
Product Engineer Interactive Media Producer

78%

outcome rate of graduates

$65K

median first-year salary of graduates

Cooperative Education

Cooperative education, or co-op for short, is full-time, paid work experience in your field of study. And it sets RIT graduates apart from their competitors. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries. RIT co-op is designed for your success

Students in the new media interactive development degree are required to complete two blocks of cooperative education experience. 

Explore salary and career information for New Media Interactive Development BS 

Curriculum for New Media Interactive Development BS

New Media Interactive Development, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
IGME-101
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving I
This course provides students with an introduction to problem solving, abstraction, and algorithmic thinking that is relevant across the field of new media. Students are introduced to object-oriented design methodologies through the creation of event-driven, media-intensive applications. Students will explore the development of software through the use of a range of algorithmic concepts related to the creation of applications by writing classes that employ the fundamental structures of computing, such as conditionals, loops, variables, data types, functions, and parameters. There is an early emphasis on object oriented concepts and design. (This course is restricted to students in NWMEDID-BS or NMDE-BFA with at least 2nd year standing or GAMED-MN students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
IGME-102
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving II
This course provides students a continued introduction to problem solving, abstraction, and algorithmic thinking that is relevant across the field of new media. As the second course in programming for new media students, this course continues an object-oriented approach to programming for creative practice. Topics will include re-usability, data structures, rich media types, event-driven programming, loaders, XML, object design, and inheritance. Emphasis is placed on the development of problem-solving skills as students develop moderately complex applications. (Prerequisites: C- or better in IGME-101 or equivalent course and students in NWMEDID-BS or NMDE-BFA with at least 2nd year standing or GAMED-MN students.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
IGME-110
Introduction to Interactive Media
This course provides an overview of media in historical, current and future contexts. Incorporating lectures and discussion with hands on work involving written and interactive media assets, students examine the role of written and visual media from theoretical as well as practical perspectives. The course also provides an introduction to interactive media development techniques, including digital media components and delivery environments. Students will be required to write formal analysis and critique papers along with digital modes of writing including collaborative editing and effective presentation design. (This course is restricted to 1st - 3rd year students in NWMEDID-BS and GAMEDES-BS.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-131
Discrete Mathematics
This course is an introduction to the topics of discrete mathematics, including number systems, sets and logic, relations, combinatorial methods, graph theory, regular sets, vectors, and matrices. (Prerequisites: MATH-101, MATH-111, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a Math Placement Exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-185
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Mathematics of Graphical Simulation I
This is the first part of a two course sequence that aims at providing the mathematical tools needed to manipulate graphical objects and to model and simulate the physical properties of these objects. Topics from linear algebra, primarily in two and three dimensional space, analytic geometry, and calculus will be presented. The emphasis is on linear algebra, particularly its application to problems in geometry and graphical systems. (Prerequisites: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or MATH-131 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
NMDE-111
New Media Design Digital Survey I
This project-based course is an investigation of the computer as an illustrative, imaging, and graphical generation tool. It develops foundational design skills in raster and vector image creation, editing, compositing, layout and visual design for online production. Emphasis will be on the application of visual design organization methods and principles for electronic media. Students will create and edit images, graphics, layouts and typography to form effective design solutions for online delivery. (This course is restricted to students in the WMC-BS or HCC-BS or NMDE-BFA or NWMEDID-BS or DIGHSS-BS program.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
3
NMDE-112
New Media Design Digital Survey II
Through formal studies and perceptual understanding, including aesthetics, graphic form, structure, concept development, visual organization methods and interaction principles, students will design graphical solutions to communication problems for static and interactive projects. Students will focus on creating appropriate and usable design systems through the successful application of design theory and best practices. Assignments exploring aspects of graphic imagery, typography, usability and production for multiple digital devices and formats will be included. (This course is restricted to students in the WMC-BS or HCC-BS or NMDE-BFA or NWMEDID-BS or DIGHSS-BS program.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
3
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
Second Year
IGME-099
Co-op Preparation Workshop
This course helps students prepare for co-operative education employment (“co-op”) by developing job search strategies and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of IGM fields to help focus their skill development strategies. Students are introduced to RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education, and learn about professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés and digital portfolios, and to prepare for interview situations. (This course is restricted to NWMEDID-BS or GAMEDES-BS or COMPEX-UND students with at least second year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
IGME-201
New Media Interactive Design and Algorithmic Problem Solving III
This is the third course in the software development sequence for new media interactive development students. Students further their exploration of problem solving and abstraction through coverage of topics such as GUI development, events, file I/O, networking, threading, and other advanced topics related to the design and development of modern dynamic applications. Programming assignments are an integral part of the course. (Prerequisites: C- or better in IGME-102 or equivalent course and student standing in NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
IGME-202
Interactive Media Development
In this course, students will learn to create visually rich interactive experiences. It is a course in programming graphics and media, but it is also a course on the relationship between ideas and code. Students will explore topics in math and physics by building programs that simulate and visualize processes in the natural world. Assignments will include major programming projects, such as building a virtual world inhabited by digital creatures that display observable behaviors. (Prerequisites: (C- or better in IGME-106 or IGME-116 or IGME-206 or IGME-201) and MATH-185 or equivalent courses and GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS Major or GAMEDD-MN students.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
IGME-230
Website Design & Implementation
This course provides an introduction to web development tools and technologies that are widely used in the development and distribution of content-focused websites and interactive web applications. Students will produce such websites and applications, and publish them using modern techniques. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: IGME-102 and (IGME-110 or NMDE-103). Students may not take and receive credit for IGME-230 and IGME-235. If you have earned credit for IGME-235 or you are currently enrolled in IGME-235 you will not be permitted to enroll in IGME-230.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
IGME-236
Interaction, Immersion, & the Media Interface (WI)
This course examines the concepts of interface and interaction models in a media-specific context, with particular emphasis on the concept of the immersive interface. This course explores concepts such as perception, expectation, Gestalt Theory, interactivity, Semiotics, presence, and immersion in the context of media application development and deployment. In addition, underlying concepts of cognitive psychology and cognitive science will be integrated where appropriate. These theories are then integrated in the exploration of the immersive interface, and with related concepts such as user-level-interface modification, augmentation of identity, and the interface as a social catalyst. (Prerequisites: (IGME-102 or IGME-106 or IGME-206) and IGME-110 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
IGME-330
Rich Media Web Application Development I
This course provides students the opportunity to explore the design and development of media-rich web applications that utilize both static and procedurally manipulated media such as text, images and audio. This course examines client and server-side web development and features common to such applications. Issues explored include framework characteristics, information management, presentation, interactivity, persistence, and data binding. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: IGME-230 or IGME-235 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
IGME-499
Undergraduate Co-op (summer)
Cooperative education is a work experience designed to supplement the educational process. Students may select from a range of activities designated as cooperative education, including relevant industrial experience, internships, entrepreneurial activities, as well as faculty-supervised research and innovation opportunities. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
STAT-145
General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Introduction to Statistics†
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-111 or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or a math placement exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective‡
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
Third Year
Choose one of the following:
3
   IGME-340
   Multi-platform Media App Development
Interactive media applications are no longer restricted to personal computers. They can now be found on many distinct hardware platforms including mobile, tablet, wearable, and large-screened computing devices. In this course, students will learn to design, prototype and develop media rich interactive experiences that can be deployed to a wide variety of hardware devices. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ISTE-454
   Mobile Application Development I
This course extends the material covered in the Foundations of Mobile Design course and provides students with the experience of creating interesting applications for small-size form factor mobile devices such as smartphones These devices are exceptionally portable, have unique sets of hardware and communications capabilities, incorporate novel interfaces, are location aware, and provide persistent connectivity. Students are encouraged to make creative use of these unique device characteristics and operating properties to develop innovative applications. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: (ISTE-252 and ISTE-340) or IGME-330 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ISTE-456
   Mobile Application Development II
This course extends the Foundations of Mobile Design course in that students will learn to apply mobile design skills to develop applications in the Android platform. Students will design, develop, and test mobile applications using the Android Studio IDE. This course covers the major components such as activities, receivers, content providers, permissions, intents, fragments, data storage, and security. Programming projects are required (Prerequisites: (ISTE-252 and ISTE-340) or IGME-330 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
IGME-430
Rich Media Web Application Development II
This course provides students the opportunity to continue the exploration of Media Rich Internet Applications (MRIAs). Topics include communications for media ecologies, distributed web application frameworks, advanced interactivity, data transformation, representation, automation, persistence, and large scale systems deployment. In addition, students are exposed to concepts and technologies related to the next generation of MRIA development. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
IGME-470
Physical Computing & Alternative Interfaces
The rich variety and widespread adoption of gestural touch screens, motion-sensing devices, weight-reactive surfaces, wearable digital devices, and similar interface products demonstrates the demand for well-integrated devices and services that seamlessly couple people and environments. Such products can interface computers with real-world inputs and outputs, and give people new ways of controlling and experiencing their devices and information. This course provides a rapid technical introduction to basic electronics (components, circuits, microcontrollers, etc.) and emphasizes the application of interface design concepts to physically interactive and innovative product development. The course requires solo and team projects that blend electronics, programming, and design. (Prerequisites: IGME-102 or IGME-106 or IGME-206 or equivalent course and at least 3rd year standing.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
3
IGME-480
Current Topics in Interactive Development
Interactive media development is a rapidly evolving field. This course provides an opportunity for students to learn and experiment with emerging themes, practices, and technologies that are not addressed elsewhere in the curriculum. Topics covered in this course will vary based on current developments in the field. Students will explore, design, and develop creative interactive experiences pertaining to the semester's domain area. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
IGME-499
Undergraduate Co-op (summer)
Cooperative education is a work experience designed to supplement the educational process. Students may select from a range of activities designated as cooperative education, including relevant industrial experience, internships, entrepreneurial activities, as well as faculty-supervised research and innovation opportunities. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
 
General Education – Electives
6
Fourth Year
IGME-588
New Media Interactive Development Capstone II
This course is designed to engage the New Media major in a capstone production experience. The instructor will form interdisciplinary student teams that will design, plan, prototype, and implement new media projects. Student groups are required to test their product with users and provide written feedback and analysis. Students will be evaluated on individual contributions and their team’s final capstone project. (Prerequisites: NMDE-401 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
NMDE-401
New Media Design Capstone I
This course will focus on individual career preparation through topics such as resume development, job research, interviewing best practices, and creating or refining an online portfolio. Additional exploration and overviews will include the business aspects, practices, and workflows of the new media industry with a focus on designer/developer/client relationships. Students will integrate project workflows, management, team building, concept generation and prototyping through small team projects, and project research for NMD Capstone II. (NMDE-BFA 4YR or NWMEDID-BS 3+) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
 
New Media Interactive Development Advanced Electives
6
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
123

Please see General Education (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† Students have the option of taking Introduction to Statistics I (STAT-145) or one of the following math courses: Calculus A (MATH-171), Project Based Calculus (MATH-181), or Calculus (MATH-181A).

‡ Students satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and the lab portions to fulfill the requirement.

New Media Interactive Development Advanced Electives

Course
IGME-340
Multi-platform Media App Development
Interactive media applications are no longer restricted to personal computers. They can now be found on many distinct hardware platforms including mobile, tablet, wearable, and large-screened computing devices. In this course, students will learn to design, prototype and develop media rich interactive experiences that can be deployed to a wide variety of hardware devices. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-350
International Game Industry
This course will immerse students in the international games industry via a study-abroad experience in a location that will vary. The course will hold several meetings on campus before departure, but then the bulk of the course will center on a two-plus-week intensive experience abroad. While abroad, RIT students will spend half the course on the campus of a host university where they will participate in classes and/or other academic offerings, participate in a weekend game jam at the host university, and visit local and regional sites with cultural, historical, and/or game industry significance. Students will spend the rest of the course in a major city center of game development visiting game studios, governmental offices related to the games industry, and/or cultural and historical sites. This course has been offered for both Germany (the largest European games market) and Japan. Other offerings in other countries may emerge over time and the country visited varies for year to year. International travel is required. (Prerequisites: IGME-320 or IGME-330 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
IGME-382
Maps, Mapping and Geospatial Technologies
This course provides a survey of underlying concepts and technologies used to represent and understand the earth, a form of new media collectively referred to as Geospatial Technologies (GTs). Students will gain hands-on experience with GTs, including Global Positioning Systems (GPSs), Geographic Information Systems (GISs), remote sensing, Virtual Globes, and geographically-oriented new media such as mapping mashups. Students also will develop basic spatial thinking, reasoning, problem solving, and literacy skills. Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-386
Spatial Algorithms and Problem Solving
This course is targeted to students with a serious interest in geographical problem solving via underlying spatial algorithms. Students will learn how to compare and contrast different specific spatial algorithms for solving specific geographic problems and develop proficiency with encoding and implementing spatial algorithms in computer programs. Students taking this course will gain a broad interdisciplinary skill set in how to think spatially and computationally through critical engagement of geographical problem solving. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
IGME-420
Level Design
This course introduces level design theory and best practice through game level analysis, evaluation, and creation. Students will learn by analyzing game levels from existing games and discussing what made those levels successful or unsuccessful. Through their analysis and hands on experience, students will gain an understanding of overall level design including layout, flow, pacing, and balance. They will enhance their understanding of level design principles by creating their own game levels. (Prerequisites: IGME-219 and IGME-220 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-422
Level Design 2
This course expands upon the level design concepts presented in IGME-420, further exploring advanced level design topics and applying them to additional game genres. The course delves deeper into level design processes and methodologies as they relate to more complex game types using a project-based format. Throughout the course, various game genres will be studied and explored, with projects including game analysis and the creation of custom levels. (Prerequisites: IGME-420 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-421
Tabletop Game Design and Development
This course explores issues pertaining to design, mechanics, development, and production of analog, tabletop hobby games, which include board games, card games, wargames, and other non-digital games catering to multiple players. Students will analyze and apply concepts and mechanics of modern tabletop game design, and build and test tabletop games. Students will work with development and prototyping tools, explore component design and art direction, and work with desktop publishing technologies. In addition, they will work directly with board game publishing and manufacturing technologies and services, and study factors pertaining to the business of tabletop games. (Prerequisites: IGME-220 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-423
Games for Change
This course provides students with the opportunity to explore games and simulations for social change and learning. Students will explore various research, design, and development techniques for applying games to addressing issues and problems in communities, from local to global. Students will learn to design and develop games and simulations as well as how to gather and analyze data about the games’ usage. Topics may include issues-based organizing and advocacy, place-based learning, and games for civics. In addition, students are exposed to current debates in the field of Games for Change. (Prerequisites: IGME-220 or equivalent course and GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-430
Rich Media Web Application Development II
This course provides students the opportunity to continue the exploration of Media Rich Internet Applications (MRIAs). Topics include communications for media ecologies, distributed web application frameworks, advanced interactivity, data transformation, representation, automation, persistence, and large scale systems deployment. In addition, students are exposed to concepts and technologies related to the next generation of MRIA development. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-440
Online Virtual Worlds & Simulations
Students will create online virtual worlds and simulations using 3D development technologies. Critical to the exploration of this area, students will learn to utilize 3D constructs for the presentation of and interaction with interactive content and dynamic experiences. The course allows students to integrate prior knowledge in design, programming, and interaction for the creation of such experiences. Individual and group projects will be required. (Prerequisites: IGME-202 and (MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-186) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-450
Casual Game Development
This course explores the design and construction of casual game experiences. Topics include modes of casual game play, mechanics for casual games, characteristics of successful games, development processes, and the distribution of casual games. Students will create casual games, and employ technologies to address issues of scalability, presentation, social interconnectivity, and game analytics. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course and restricted to students in NWMEDID-BS or IGME-320 or equivalent course and restricted to students in GAMEDES-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-451
Systems Concepts for Games and Media
This course focuses on systems-based theoretical models of computation in the context of a media-delivery modality. Students will explore concepts such as memory management, parallel processing, platform limitations, storage, scheduling, system I/O, and optimization from a media-centric perspective. Particular emphasis will be placed on the integration of these concepts in relation to industry standard hardware including game consoles, mobile devices, custom input hardware, etc. (Prerequisites: IGME-309 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
ISTE-454
Mobile Application Development I
This course extends the material covered in the Foundations of Mobile Design course and provides students with the experience of creating interesting applications for small-size form factor mobile devices such as smartphones These devices are exceptionally portable, have unique sets of hardware and communications capabilities, incorporate novel interfaces, are location aware, and provide persistent connectivity. Students are encouraged to make creative use of these unique device characteristics and operating properties to develop innovative applications. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: (ISTE-252 and ISTE-340) or IGME-330 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
ISTE-456
Mobile Application Development II
This course extends the Foundations of Mobile Design course in that students will learn to apply mobile design skills to develop applications in the Android platform. Students will design, develop, and test mobile applications using the Android Studio IDE. This course covers the major components such as activities, receivers, content providers, permissions, intents, fragments, data storage, and security. Programming projects are required (Prerequisites: (ISTE-252 and ISTE-340) or IGME-330 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-460
Data Visualization
Our world is flooded with data, and making sense of it can be a challenge. Visualizations help by exposing information, trends, and correlations that might otherwise go unnoticed in the raw data. In this course, students will learn to collect, clean, organize, and filter data sets of their own choosing. They will learn and apply principles from multiple fields including visual design, the psychology of perception, user experience design, and ethics. They will create static and interactive visualizations with a variety of information structures (hierarchies, maps, timelines, etc.). Students will learn to develop exploratory experiences that tell the story within the data. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-470
Physical Computing & Alternative Interfaces
The rich variety and widespread adoption of gestural touch screens, motion-sensing devices, weight-reactive surfaces, wearable digital devices, and similar interface products demonstrates the demand for well-integrated devices and services that seamlessly couple people and environments. Such products can interface computers with real-world inputs and outputs, and give people new ways of controlling and experiencing their devices and information. This course provides a rapid technical introduction to basic electronics (components, circuits, microcontrollers, etc.) and emphasizes the application of interface design concepts to physically interactive and innovative product development. The course requires solo and team projects that blend electronics, programming, and design. (Prerequisites: IGME-102 or IGME-106 or IGME-206 or equivalent course and at least 3rd year standing.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-480
Current Topics in Interactive Development
Interactive media development is a rapidly evolving field. This course provides an opportunity for students to learn and experiment with emerging themes, practices, and technologies that are not addressed elsewhere in the curriculum. Topics covered in this course will vary based on current developments in the field. Students will explore, design, and develop creative interactive experiences pertaining to the semester's domain area. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-484
Geographic Visualization
This course examines the use of maps for geographic problem solving and scientific inquiry. Students will learn theory, concepts and techniques associated with maps and new media such as geographic problem solving and scientific inquiry devices such as map comprehension, evaluation, construction, usage, and assessment. Students will also learn how to compare, contrast, and implement map-based geographic problem solving and scientific inquiry techniques with geographically-oriented new media such as thematic cartography, geographic information visualization, three dimensional modeling and animated and interactive maps. A geographic problem solving research project that incorporates thematic cartography and geographic visualization solutions is required. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 3rd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
IGME-529
Foundations of Interactive Narrative
This course focuses on the major elements of narrative for interactive environments. Students in this course explore the basics of narrative in the context of interactive games and media, with examination of digital storytelling in games and interactive environments of several varieties. Branching narrative, hypertext, multi- and non-linear concepts are also explored with an emphasis on balancing immersive and interactive aspects of digital narrative. (Prerequisites: IGME-202 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-531
Aesthetics and Computation
Students will design and build creative applications, while studying the history of computation in the visual arts, music, and other relevant areas. Technical topics include advanced audiovisual programming techniques, while theoretical topics include foundational discussions on artificial life, generative art, microsound, participatory and process-based art, programming as performance, and computational creativity. Individual and/or group projects will be required. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-540
Foundations of Game Graphics Programming
Students will explore the use of an advanced graphics API to access hardware-accelerated graphics in a real-time graphics engine context. The course will involve discussion of scene graphs, optimizations, and integration with the API object structure, as well as input schemes, content pipelines, and 2D and 3D rendering techniques. Students will also explore the advanced use of the API calls in production code to construct environments capable of real-time performance. Students will construct from scratch a fully functional graphics engine, with library construction for game development. (Prerequisites: IGME-309 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-550
Foundations of Game Engine Design and Development
This course will provide students with theory and practical skills in game engine design topic areas such as understanding the graphics pipeline as it influences engine design, hardware principles and the relationship to game engine construction, mathematical principles involved in game engine design, scene graph construction and maintenance, texture and materials management, collision systems, physics systems, particle systems, and control systems. Furthermore, this course will examine software and toolsets that assist game engine designers in their tasks. Students will be expected to design and implement a game engine in teams as well as properly document their design and development strategy. (Prerequisites: IGME-540 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-560
Artificial Intelligence for Game Environments
This course explores introductory artificial intelligence concepts through both a theoretical and practical perspective, with an emphasis on how to apply these concepts in a game development context. In particular the course focuses on applying concepts such as search, reactive intelligence, knowledge representation, and machine learning to real-time situations and applications as relevant to the field of entertainment technology and simulation. (Prerequisites: IGME-309 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-570
Digital Audio Production
Technologies and techniques for producing and manipulating digital audio are explored. Topics include digital representations of sound, digital audio recording and production, MIDI, synthesis techniques, real-time performance issues, and the application of digital audio to multimedia and Web production. (Prerequisites: IGME-202 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-571
Interactive Game and Audio
This course provides students with exposure to the design, creation and production of audio in interactive applications and computer games. Students will become familiar with the use of sound libraries, recording sounds in the studio and in the field, generating sound with synthesizers, and effects processing. Students will create sound designs for interactive media, integrating music, dialog, ambient sound, sound effects and interface sounds within interactive programs. (Prerequisites: IGME-202 or equivalent course and student standing in GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-580
IGM Production Studio
This course will allow students to work as domain specialists on teams completing one or more large projects over the course of the semester. The projects will be relevant to experiences of the interactive games and media programs, but will require expertise in a variety of sub-domains, including web design and development, social computing, computer game development, multi-user media, human-computer interaction and streaming media. Students will learn to apply concepts of project management and scheduling, production roles and responsibilities, and their domain skill sets to multidisciplinary projects. Students will complete design documents, progress reports and final assessments of themselves and their teammates in addition to completing their assigned responsibilities on the main projects. (Prerequisites: IGME-330 or equivalent course and restricted to students in NWMEDID-BS or IGME-320 or equivalent course and restricted to students in GAMEDES-BS.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
IGME-581
Innovation & Invention
In this course, students explore the process and products of innovation and invention. Each semester a multi-disciplinary team of students conceives and develops a different outside the box project. Readings, projects, scholarly term papers, and pragmatic challenges of collaboration and communication across disciplines provides direct experience of the interplay of technology, human nature, and a human environment in which emerging technologies and new modes of interaction are pervasive and ubiquitous. Artists, natural scientists, social scientists, and technologists are guided through a series of collaborative experiences inventing, designing, implementing and studying emerging technologies. Presentations, projects and individually-written research papers are required. The faculty staff and resources of the Center for Student Innovation are significant assets for this course. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 3rd year standing.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-582
Humanitarian Free & Open Source Software Development
This course provides students with exposure to the design, creation and production of Open Source Software projects. Students will be introduced to the historic intersections of technology and intellectual property rights and will become familiar with Open Source development processes, tools and practices. They will become contributing members of humanitarian software, game and interactive media development communities. Students will actively document their efforts on Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software community hubs. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with 2nd year standing.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-583
Legal and Business Aspects of FOSS
The entertainment and software industries are grappling with the impacts of free software digital distribution. Agile development, 3D printing, the Internet and other technologies are changing the face of how business is done, as well as what business can charge for and hold onto. Disruptive technologies, emerging interfaces, and real-time, on-demand product creation and distribution are transforming our entertainment, telecommunications and manufacturing landscapes. This course will examine the impacts of these new technologies and the new thinking that are taking us into these new worlds. (Prerequisites: IGME-582 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-584
Software Development on Linux Systems
Students will learn how to package software for release and engage in version maintenance within the FOSS community. Topics such as Linux package management, version control systems, potential license conflicts, development vs. production releases, bug tracking, maintenance management, forking, patching and future development will be covered in from both a management and end-user perspective in lectures, lab exercises and a project. (Prerequisites: IGME-582 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-585
Project in FOSS Development
Free and Open Source Software development is an internationally growing methodology for distributing work across multiple developers. The process can be applied to small garage-sized teams (small utility packages, multimedia plugins, simple games) or teams of hundreds (Mozilla, Java, Linux). This course builds on the introductory experience provided in the prerequisite to provide hands-on open-source development experience in a large-scale, project that will be prepared for open-source distribution. The actual projects and domains addressed will vary offering to offering, but will be along the lines of those listed above. (Prerequisites: IGME-582 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-588
New Media Interactive Development Capstone II
This course is designed to engage the New Media major in a capstone production experience. The instructor will form interdisciplinary student teams that will design, plan, prototype, and implement new media projects. Student groups are required to test their product with users and provide written feedback and analysis. Students will be evaluated on individual contributions and their team’s final capstone project. (Prerequisites: NMDE-401 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
IGME-589
Research Studio
This course will allow students to work as domain specialists on teams completing one or more faculty research projects over the course of the semester. The faculty member teaching the class will provide the research topic(s). Students will learn about research methodology to implement, test, and evaluate results of projects. Students will complete research reports and final assessments of themselves and their teammates in addition to completing their assigned responsibilities on the main projects. (This course is restricted to students in NWMEDID-BS or GAMEDES-BS with 3rd year standing.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
IGME-590
Undergraduate Seminar in IGM
This is intended to allow for special one-time offerings of undergraduate topics or to allow faculty to pilot new undergraduate offerings. Specific course details (such as the course topics, format, resource needs, and credit hours) will be determined by the faculty member(s) who propose a given special-topics offering. (This course is restricted to students in NWMEDID-BS or GAMEDES-BS with 3rd year standing.) Lec/Lab (Fall, Spring, Summer).
IGME-599
Independent Study
The student will work independently under the supervision of a faculty advisor on a topic not covered in other courses. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).
IGME-601
Game Development Processes
This course examines the individual and group roles of the development process model within the game design and development industry. Students will transform design document specifications into software and hardware needs for developers, testers, and end users. Students will examine team dynamics and processes for technical development, content development, testing, deployment, and maintenance. Students will explore the design process through the deconstruction of the game industry's software lifecycle model. (This course is restricted to students in the GAMEDES-MS program.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-602
Game Design
This course presents students with core theories of game design, informed by research results from media theory, narrative methods and models, theories of ideation, and the nature of games, play and fun. Specific emphasis is placed on the examination of historical successes and failures, along with presentation of ethical and cultural issues related to the design of interactive software. Students will engage in formal critique and analysis of media designs and their formal elements. (This course is restricted to students in the GAMEDES-MS program.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-603
Gameplay and Prototyping
This course explores the pragmatic issues of creative concept development through story-boarding, pitching, prototyping and play-testing. Students will use various tools and techniques to build game prototypes that they will evaluate through play-testing in an incremental design process informed by market research and analysis. (This course is restricted to students in the GAMEDES-MS program.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-621
Board and Card Game Design and Development
This course explores issues pertaining to design, mechanics, development, and production of analog, tabletop “hobby” games, which include board games, card games, wargames, and other non-digital games catering to multiple players. Students will analyze and apply concepts and mechanics of modern tabletop game design, and build and test both competitive and cooperative tabletop games, designed specifically for a global audience. Students will work with development and prototyping tools, explore component design and art direction, and work with desktop publishing technologies. In addition, they will work directly with board game publishing and manufacturing technologies and services, and study factors pertaining to the business of tabletop games, and produce a professional, polished tabletop game. (Prerequisites: (IGME-602 and student is matriculated in GAMEDES-MS); or (IGME-220 and student is matriculated in GAMEDES-BS/NWMEDID-BS)) Lecture 3 (Spring).
IGME-622
Game Balance
This course is an in-depth exploration of the sub-field of game design known as balance. Topics include: transitive mechanics and cost/power curves; economic systems in games; probability and the psychology of randomness; pseudorandom numbers; situational balance; level/XP curves, advancement and pacing; tuning; statistics, metrics, and analytics; intransitive mechanics, game theory, and payoff matrices; and the applied use of spreadsheets. (This course is restricted to students in the GAMEDES-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
IGME-623
Theory and Design of Role Play and Interactive Media
Role playing games (RPGs) are among the most popular game forms. RPG design incorporates elements from most game genre. This course will address all aspects of design relevant to role play, both digital and analog, and the course will focus on the underlying theory of role play as a practice. We will talk about popular games, but will also spend time on experimental and innovative role play. Students should expect to study playing styles, RPG structure, and to both study and produce effective interactive narrative. Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-624
Tabletop Role-Playing Game Design and Development
This course explores the concepts and mechanics of analog role-playing games, such as tabletop "pencil-and-paper" and live-action role-playing games, from a practical, hands-on perspective. In this project-based course, students will develop their own rule systems to facilitate various facets of role-playing and associated game mechanics, then playtest and publish their games. Students will also use desktop publishing tools to produce game rules and supplemental materials suitable for publication. Note that this course assumes that students have extensive experience in playing tabletop role-playing games. (Prerequisites: (IGME-602 and student is matriculated in GAMEDES-MS); or (IGME-220 and student is matriculated in GAMEDES-BS/NWMEDID-BS)) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-670
Digital Audio Production
Technologies and techniques for producing and manipulating digital audio are explored. Topics include digital representations of sound, digital audio recording and production, MIDI, synthesis techniques, real-time performance issues, and the application of digital audio to multimedia and Web production. (Students must be in GAMEDES-MS or GAMEDES-BS and have taken IGME-202. Undergraduate students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken IGME-570.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
IGME-671
Interactive Game and Audio
This course provides students with exposure to the design, creation and production of audio in interactive applications and computer games. Students will become familiar with the use of sound libraries, recording sounds in the studio and in the field, generating sound with synthesizers, and effects processing. Students will create sound designs for interactive media, integrating music, dialog, ambient sound, sound effects and interface sounds within interactive programs. (Students must be in GAMEDES-MS or GAMEDES-BS and have taken IGME-202. Undergraduate students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken IGME-571.not if IGME-571) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
IGME-680
IGM Production Studio
This course will allow students to work as domain specialists on teams completing one or more large projects over the course of the semester. The projects will be relevant to experiences of the interactive games and media programs, but they will require expertise in a variety of sub-domains, including web design and development, social computing, computer game development, multi-user media, human-computer interaction and streaming media. Students will learn to apply concepts of project management and scheduling, production roles and responsibilities, and their domain skill sets to multidisciplinary projects. Students will complete design documents, progress reports and final assessments of themselves and their teammates in addition to completing their assigned responsibilities on the main projects. (Prerequisites: IGME-601 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-681
Innovation & Invention
In this course, students explore the process and products of innovation and invention. Each semester we conceive and develop a different outside the box project in a multidisciplinary tinkerer's lab. Readings, lectures, student presentations, and discussions deal with the interplay of technology, human nature, and a human environment in which emerging technologies and new modes of interaction are pervasive and ubiquitous. Students from multiple disciplines are guided through a series of collaborative experiences inventing, designing, implementing and studying emerging technologies and their educational and artistic potential. Presentations, projects and individual research papers are required. (This course requires permission of the Instructor to enroll.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
IGME-690
IGM Seminar
This is intended to allow for special one-time offerings of graduate topics. Specific course details (such as the course topics, format, resource needs, and credit hours) will be determined by the faculty member(s) who propose a given seminar offering. (Varies) (This course is restricted to GAMEDES-MS students or (GAMEDES-BS or NWMEDID-BS students with 3rd year standing).) Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
NMDE-201
New Media Design Elements II
Information design for static, dynamic and interactive multimedia integrates content with visual indicators. Legibility and clear communication of information and direction is important to the success of any user interface design. This course integrates imagery, type, icons, actions, color, visual hierarchy, and information architecture as a foundation to design successful interactive experiences. (Prerequisites: NMDE-102 or 112 or equivalent course and student standing in NMDE-BFA or HCC-BS or DIGHSS-BS program.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
NMDE-203
New Media Design Interactive II
This course extends previous interactive design and development experience and skills to emphasize interactive design principles and development. The emphasis in this course will be on the creative process of planning and implementing an interactive project across multiple platforms. Students will concentrate on information architecture, interactive design, conceptual creation, digital assets, visual design and programming for interactions. (Prerequisites: NMDE-103 or ISTE-140 and NMDE-112 and NMDE-201 or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
NMDE-302
New Media Design Graphical User Interface
This course examines the user-centered and iterative design approaches to application and interactive development with a focus on interface design, testing and development across multiple devices. Students will research and investigate human factors, visual metaphors and prototype development to create effective and cutting edge user interfaces. (Prerequisites: NMDE-201 and NMDE-203 or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 4 years of math including pre-calculus required
  • Requires chemistry or physics and strongly recommends both.
  • Computing electives are recommended

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in computer science, calculus, liberal arts; calculus-based physics, chemistry, or biology

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in computer science, engineering science, or liberal arts

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

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