Applied Mathematics Bachelor of Science Degree

RIT’s applied mathematics bachelor’s degree focuses on mathematically analyzing and solving problems such as models for perfecting global positioning systems, analyzing cost-effectiveness in manufacturing processes, or improving digital encryption software.


90%

Outcome Rate of RIT Graduates from this degree

#3

Ranking for Mathematicians on Best Business Jobs List, U.S. News & World Report


Overview for Applied Mathematics BS

Why Study Applied Mathematics at RIT

  • Campus Community: Join PiRIT, a student club that fosters a community of students and faculty in mathematics and statistics.
  • Career Connections: The Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education hosts a career fair for students to connect with National Labs and federally-funded Research Centers.
  • Jobs at Industry Leading Companies: Recent applied mathematics graduates employed at Google, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, JP Morgan Chase, and Northrop Grumman Corporation.

What is applied mathematics?

Mathematicians use theory, computational techniques, algorithms, and the latest computer technology to solve economic, scientific, engineering, physics, and business problems. Applied mathematics starts with a practical problem, envisions its separate elements, and then reduces the elements to mathematical variables. Applied mathematicians often use computers to analyze relationships among the variables, and they solve complex problems by developing models with alternative solutions.

RIT’s BS Applied Mathematics 

RIT’s applied mathematics bachelor’s degree focuses on the study and solution of problems that can be mathematically analyzed across industrial fields and research disciplines. While studying applied mathematics, you will gain the knowledge and skills to collaborate on complex problems with scientists, engineers, computer specialists, and other analysts. Some areas in which you will practice applied mathematics include:

  • Applied statistics
  • Biology
  • Business
  • Economics
  • Chemistry
  • Electrical, industrial, or mechanical engineering
  • Operations research
  • Imaging science

Real-World Experiences in Applied Mathematics

In RIT’s applied mathematics bachelor’s degree, you’ll collaborate with a faculty researcher on a variety of projects in both applied and theoretical mathematics providing you with valuable exposure to real-world problems faced by America's top companies and research organizations. As a result, RIT undergraduates in mathematics are highly sought after for co-op positions.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work with researchers in the School of Mathematics and Statistics studying interesting problems in areas such as computational photonics, mathematical biology, microelectromechanical systems, and network analysis.

RIT’s science co-ops include cooperative education and internships, lab work, undergraduate research, and clinical experience in health care settings. These opportunities provide hands-on experience that enables you to apply your scientific, math, and health care knowledge in a professional setting, while you make valuable connections between classwork and real-world applications.

Furthering Your Education in Applied Mathematics 

Master’s Degrees and Doctorates

RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences at introduces applied mathematics bachelor’s degree students to rigorous advanced applied mathematical and statistical methodology as a tool in the study of exciting problems in science, business, and industry. The school offers the following advanced degrees:

Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees

Today’s careers require advanced degrees grounded in real-world experience. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in as little as five years of study, all while gaining the valuable hands-on experience that comes from co-ops, internships, research, study abroad, and more.

+1 MBA: Students who enroll in a qualifying undergraduate degree have the opportunity to add an MBA to their bachelor’s degree after their first year of study, depending on their program. Learn how the +1 MBA can accelerate your learning and position you for success.

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Careers and Experiential Learning

Typical Job Titles

Actuarial Analyst Data Scientist
Quality Assurance Inspector Software Engineer
Senior Technician Forecast Analyst
Systems Operations Engineer

Cooperative Education

What’s different about an RIT education? It’s the career experience you gain by completing cooperative education and internships with top companies in every single industry. You’ll earn more than a degree. You’ll gain real-world career experience that sets you apart. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries. 

Co-ops and internships take your knowledge and turn it into know-how. Science co-ops include a range of hands-on experiences, from co-ops and internships and work in labs to undergraduate research and clinical experience in health care settings. These opportunities provide the hands-on experience that enables you to apply your scientific, math, and health care knowledge in professional settings while you make valuable connections between classwork and real-world applications.

National Labs Career Events and Recruiting

The Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education offers National Labs and federally-funded Research Centers from all research areas and sponsoring agencies a variety of options to connect with and recruit students. Students connect with employer partners to gather information on their laboratories and explore co-op, internship, research, and full-time opportunities.  These national labs focus on scientific discovery, clean energy development, national security, technology advancements, and more. Recruiting events include our university-wide Fall Career Fair, on-campus and virtual interviews, information sessions, 1:1 networking with lab representatives, and a National Labs Resume Book available to all labs.

Featured Profiles

Curriculum for 2023-2024 for Applied Mathematics BS

Current Students: See Curriculum Requirements

Applied Mathematics, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSCI-101
Principles of Computing (General Education)
This course is designed to introduce students to the central ideas of computing. Students will engage in activities that show how computing changes the world and impacts daily lives. Students will develop step-by-step written solutions to basic problems and implement their solutions using a programming language. Assignments will be completed both individually and in small teams. Students will be required to demonstrate oral and written communication skills through such assignments as short papers, homeworks, group discussions and debates, and development of a term paper. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CSCI-141
Computer Science I (General Education)
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-199
Mathematics and Statistics Seminar
This course introduces the programs within the School of Mathematical Sciences, and provides an introduction to math and statistics software. The course provides practice in technical writing. Seminar 1 (Fall).
1
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective ‡
4
Second Year
MATH-200
Discrete Mathematics and Introduction to Proofs
This course prepares students for professions that use mathematics in daily practice, and for mathematics courses beyond the introductory level where it is essential to communicate effectively in the language of mathematics. It covers various methods of mathematical proof, starting with basic techniques in propositional and predicate calculus and set theory, and then moving to applications in advanced mathematics. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 4 (Fall).
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MATH-399
Mathematical Sciences Job Search Seminar
This course helps students prepare to search for co-op or full-time employment. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search and transitioning into the work world. The course meets one hour each week for five weeks. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
STAT-257
Statistical Inference
Learn how data furthers understanding of science and engineering. This course covers basic statistical concepts, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, point estimation, and simple linear regression. A statistical software package such as MINITAB will be used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-251. NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both MATH-252 and STAT-257 nor for both STAT-205 and STAT-257.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
   MATH-241
   Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MATH-190 or MATH-200 or MATH-219 or MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   MATH-241H
   Honors Linear Algebra
 
Choose one of the following:
4
   MATH-221
   Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   MATH-221H
   Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education)
 
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective‡
4
Third Year
MATH-431
Real Variables I
This course is an investigation and extension of the theoretical aspects of elementary calculus. Topics include mathematical induction, real numbers, sequences, functions, limits, and continuity. The workshop will focus on helping students develop skill in writing proofs. (Prerequisites: (MATH-190 or MATH-200 or 1055-265) and (MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or 1016-410 or 1016-328) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Program Electives
18
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Open Elective
3
Fourth Year
MATH-411
Numerical Analysis
This course covers numerical techniques for the solution of nonlinear equations, interpolation, differentiation, integration, and the solution of initial value problems. (Prerequisites: (MATH-231 and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H)) or MATH-233 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-421
Mathematical Modeling (WI-PR)
This course explores problem solving, formulation of the mathematical model from physical considerations, solution of the mathematical problem, testing the model and interpretation of results. Problems are selected from the physical sciences, engineering, and economics. (Prerequisites: (MATH-220 or MATH-221 or 1016-410 or 1016-328) and MATH-231 and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H) and MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-441
Abstract Algebra I
This course covers basic set theory, number theory, groups, subgroups, cyclic and permutation groups, Lagrange and Sylow theorems, quotient groups, and isomorphism theorems. Group Theory finds applications in other scientific disciplines like physics and chemistry. (Prerequisites: (MATH-190 or MATH-200 or 1055-265) and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-501
Experiential Learning Requirement in Mathematics
The experiential learning requirement in the Applied Mathematics and Computational Mathematics programs can be accomplished in various ways. This course exists to record the completion of experiential learning activities that have been pre-approved by the School of Mathematical Sciences. Such pre-approval is considered on a case-by-case basis. Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Electives
6
 
Program Elective
3
 
Open Electives
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
121

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either University Physics I (PHYS-211) and University Physics II (PHYS-212) or General & Analytical Chemistry I and Lab (CHMG-141/145) and General & Analytical Chemistry II and Lab (CHMG-142/146) or General Biology I and Lab (BIOL-101/103) and General Biology II and Lab (BIOL-102/104).

Combined Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's Degrees

The curriculum below outlines the typical course sequence(s) for combined accelerated degrees available with this bachelor's degree.

Applied Mathematics, BS degree/Applied and Computational Mathematics (thesis option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSCI-101
Principles of Computing (General Education)
This course is designed to introduce students to the central ideas of computing. Students will engage in activities that show how computing changes the world and impacts daily lives. Students will develop step-by-step written solutions to basic problems and implement their solutions using a programming language. Assignments will be completed both individually and in small teams. Students will be required to demonstrate oral and written communication skills through such assignments as short papers, homeworks, group discussions and debates, and development of a term paper. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CSCI-141
 Computer Science I (General Education)
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-199
Mathematics and Statistics Seminar
This course introduces the programs within the School of Mathematical Sciences, and provides an introduction to math and statistics software. The course provides practice in technical writing. Seminar 1 (Fall).
1
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective‡
4
Second Year
MATH-200
Discrete Mathematics and Introduction to Proofs
This course prepares students for professions that use mathematics in daily practice, and for mathematics courses beyond the introductory level where it is essential to communicate effectively in the language of mathematics. It covers various methods of mathematical proof, starting with basic techniques in propositional and predicate calculus and set theory, and then moving to applications in advanced mathematics. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 4 (Fall).
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics 
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MATH-399
Mathematical Sciences Job Search Seminar
This course helps students prepare to search for co-op or full-time employment. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search and transitioning into the work world. The course meets one hour each week for five weeks. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
STAT-257
Statistical Inference
Learn how data furthers understanding of science and engineering. This course covers basic statistical concepts, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, point estimation, and simple linear regression. A statistical software package such as MINITAB will be used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-251. NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both MATH-252 and STAT-257 nor for both STAT-205 and STAT-257.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
4
   MATH-221
   Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   MATH-221H
   Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus
 
Choose one of the following:
3
   MATH-241
   Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MATH-190 or MATH-200 or MATH-219 or MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   MATH-241H
   Honors Linear Algebra
 
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective‡
4
Third Year
MATH-431
Real Variables I
This course is an investigation and extension of the theoretical aspects of elementary calculus. Topics include mathematical induction, real numbers, sequences, functions, limits, and continuity. The workshop will focus on helping students develop skill in writing proofs. (Prerequisites: (MATH-190 or MATH-200 or 1055-265) and (MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or 1016-410 or 1016-328) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Program Electives
15
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Elective
3
Fourth Year
MATH-411
Numerical Analysis
This course covers numerical techniques for the solution of nonlinear equations, interpolation, differentiation, integration, and the solution of initial value problems. (Prerequisites: (MATH-231 and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H)) or MATH-233 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-421
Mathematical Modeling (WI-PR)
This course explores problem solving, formulation of the mathematical model from physical considerations, solution of the mathematical problem, testing the model and interpretation of results. Problems are selected from the physical sciences, engineering, and economics. (Prerequisites: (MATH-220 or MATH-221 or 1016-410 or 1016-328) and MATH-231 and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H) and MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-441
Abstract Algebra I
This course covers basic set theory, number theory, groups, subgroups, cyclic and permutation groups, Lagrange and Sylow theorems, quotient groups, and isomorphism theorems. Group Theory finds applications in other scientific disciplines like physics and chemistry. (Prerequisites: (MATH-190 or MATH-200 or 1055-265) and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-501
Experiential Learning Requirement in Mathematics
The experiential learning requirement in the Applied Mathematics and Computational Mathematics programs can be accomplished in various ways. This course exists to record the completion of experiential learning activities that have been pre-approved by the School of Mathematical Sciences. Such pre-approval is considered on a case-by-case basis. Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MATH-606
Graduate Seminar I
The course prepares students to engage in activities necessary for independent mathematical research and introduces students to a broad range of active interdisciplinary programs related to applied mathematics. (This course is restricted to students in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Lecture 2 (Fall).
1
MATH-607
Graduate Seminar II
This course is a continuation of Graduate Seminar I. It prepares students to engage in activities necessary for independent mathematical research and introduces them to a broad range of active interdisciplinary programs related to applied mathematics. (Prerequisite: MATH-606 or equivalent course or students in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Lecture 2 (Spring).
1
 
Math Graduate Core Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Electives
6
Fifth Year
MATH-790
Research and Thesis
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. (This course is restricted to students in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
7
 
MATH Graduate Electives
12
Total Semester Credit Hours
145

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either University Physics I (PHYS-211) and University Physics II (PHYS-212) or General & Analytical Chemistry I and Lab (CHMG-141/145) and General & Analytical Chemistry II and Lab (CHMG-142/146) or General Biology I and Lab (BIOL-101/103) and General Biology II and Lab (BIOL-102/104).

Applied Mathematics, BS degree/Applied and Computational Mathematics (project option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSCI-101
Principles of Computing (General Education)
This course is designed to introduce students to the central ideas of computing. Students will engage in activities that show how computing changes the world and impacts daily lives. Students will develop step-by-step written solutions to basic problems and implement their solutions using a programming language. Assignments will be completed both individually and in small teams. Students will be required to demonstrate oral and written communication skills through such assignments as short papers, homeworks, group discussions and debates, and development of a term paper. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CSCI-141
Computer Science I  (General Education)
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-199
Mathematics and Statistics Seminar
This course introduces the programs within the School of Mathematical Sciences, and provides an introduction to math and statistics software. The course provides practice in technical writing. Seminar 1 (Fall).
1
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry and Scientific Principles Perspective‡
4
Second Year
MATH-200
Discrete Mathematics and Introduction to Proofs
This course prepares students for professions that use mathematics in daily practice, and for mathematics courses beyond the introductory level where it is essential to communicate effectively in the language of mathematics. It covers various methods of mathematical proof, starting with basic techniques in propositional and predicate calculus and set theory, and then moving to applications in advanced mathematics. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 4 (Fall).
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics 
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MATH-399
Mathematical Sciences Job Search Seminar
This course helps students prepare to search for co-op or full-time employment. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search and transitioning into the work world. The course meets one hour each week for five weeks. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
STAT-257
Statistical Inference
Learn how data furthers understanding of science and engineering. This course covers basic statistical concepts, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, point estimation, and simple linear regression. A statistical software package such as MINITAB will be used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-251. NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both MATH-252 and STAT-257 nor for both STAT-205 and STAT-257.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
Choose one of the following:
4
   MATH-221
   Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   MATH-221H
   Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus
 
Choose one of the following:
3
   MATH-241
   Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MATH-190 or MATH-200 or MATH-219 or MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   MATH-241H
   Honors Linear Algebra
 
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry and Scientific Principles Perspective‡
4
Third Year
MATH-431
Real Variables I
This course is an investigation and extension of the theoretical aspects of elementary calculus. Topics include mathematical induction, real numbers, sequences, functions, limits, and continuity. The workshop will focus on helping students develop skill in writing proofs. (Prerequisites: (MATH-190 or MATH-200 or 1055-265) and (MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or 1016-410 or 1016-328) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Program Electives
15
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Elective
3
Fourth Year
MATH-411
Numerical Analysis
This course covers numerical techniques for the solution of nonlinear equations, interpolation, differentiation, integration, and the solution of initial value problems. (Prerequisites: (MATH-231 and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H)) or MATH-233 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-421
Mathematical Modeling (WI-PR)
This course explores problem solving, formulation of the mathematical model from physical considerations, solution of the mathematical problem, testing the model and interpretation of results. Problems are selected from the physical sciences, engineering, and economics. (Prerequisites: (MATH-220 or MATH-221 or 1016-410 or 1016-328) and MATH-231 and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H) and MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-441
Abstract Algebra I
This course covers basic set theory, number theory, groups, subgroups, cyclic and permutation groups, Lagrange and Sylow theorems, quotient groups, and isomorphism theorems. Group Theory finds applications in other scientific disciplines like physics and chemistry. (Prerequisites: (MATH-190 or MATH-200 or 1055-265) and (MATH-241 or MATH-241H) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-606
Graduate Seminar I
The course prepares students to engage in activities necessary for independent mathematical research and introduces students to a broad range of active interdisciplinary programs related to applied mathematics. (This course is restricted to students in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Lecture 2 (Fall).
1
MATH-607
Graduate Seminar II
This course is a continuation of Graduate Seminar I. It prepares students to engage in activities necessary for independent mathematical research and introduces them to a broad range of active interdisciplinary programs related to applied mathematics. (Prerequisite: MATH-606 or equivalent course or students in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Lecture 2 (Spring).
1
 
Math Graduate Core Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Electives
6
Fifth Year
MATH-790
Research and Thesis
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. (This course is restricted to students in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
 
MATH Graduate Electives
15
Total Semester Credit Hours
145

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either University Physics I (PHYS-211) and University Physics II (PHYS-212) or General & Analytical Chemistry I and Lab (CHMG-141/145) and General & Analytical Chemistry II and Lab (CHMG-142/146) or General Biology I and Lab (BIOL-101/103) and General Biology II and Lab (BIOL-102/104).

Admissions and Financial Aid

This program is STEM designated when studying on campus and full time.

First-Year Admission

A strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. This includes:

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of social studies and/or history
  • 4 years of mathematics is required and must include algebra, geometry, algebra 2/trigonometry, and pre-calculus. Calculus is preferred.
  • 2-3 years of science is required and must include chemistry or physics; both are recommended.

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree
Courses in liberal arts, physics, math, and chemistry

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer
AS degree in liberal arts with math/science option

Learn How to Apply

Financial Aid and Scholarships

100% of all incoming first-year and transfer students receive aid.

RIT’s personalized and comprehensive financial aid program includes scholarships, grants, loans, and campus employment programs. When all these are put to work, your actual cost may be much lower than the published estimated cost of attendance.
Learn more about financial aid and scholarships

Research

Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Many students join research teams and engage in research projects starting as early as their first year. Participation in applied mathematics research leads to the development of real-world skills, enhanced problem-solving techniques, and broader career opportunities. Our students have opportunities to travel to national conferences for presentations and also become contributing authors on peer-reviewed manuscripts. Explore the variety of mathematics and statistics undergraduate research projects happening across the university.

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