Chemistry BS - Curriculum

Chemistry BS

Chemistry, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHEM-171
Advanced General Chemistry I
Advanced General Chemistry designed for aspiring chemical professionals. Students will learn the fundamental concepts that support a modern understanding of chemistry. Atomic and molecular structures are presented and investigated using quantum mechanics. The relationship between quantum mechanics, molecular structure, and material properties is emphasized. (Co-requisites: CHEM-175 and (MATH-171 or MATH-181) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHEM-172
Advanced General Chemistry II
Advanced General Chemistry course for aspiring chemical professionals. Students will learn the fundamental concepts that support a modern understanding of chemistry. The relationship between chemical energy and the physical processes of systems is emphasized. Chemical reactions are discussed from a thermodynamic and kinetic perspective. (Prerequisites: CHEM-171 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHEM-176 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHEM-175
Advanced General Chemistry I Lab
This course provides an introduction to a modern chemical laboratory and complements CHEM-171 lecture material through the use of experimentation. Emphasis is placed on laboratory safety, general laboratory practices, and the use of instrumentation to aid in the understanding of concepts. Topics will include keeping a lab notebook, introduction to Excel, Avogadro’s number, atomic and molecular structure, and thermochemistry. (Co-requisite: CHEM-171 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
CHEM-176
Advanced General Chemistry II
A continuation of Advanced General Chemistry I Lab, this course complements CHEM-172 lecture material through experimentation. Emphasis is placed on laboratory techniques, analysis of results, and formal scientific reporting. Topics include chemical kinetics, pH indicators and buffers, measurement of pH, and extraction of copper from copper wire. Special topics to be included. (Prerequisites: CHEM-175 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHEM-172 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Spring).
1
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
Second Year
CHMA-211
Quantitative Analysis
This course will introduce students to quantitative methods. The course will cover gravimetric techniques, equilibria, statistical methods, and solution chemistry. In addition, equilibrium for polyprotic acids, electrochemistry and potentiometry will be discussed. (Prerequisites: (CHEM-172 and CHEM-176) or (CHMG-142 and CHMG-146) or (CHEM-151 and CHEM-155) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: CHMA-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMA-215
Analytical Methods Lab
This laboratory is designed for chemistry and biochemistry majors or those interested in pursuing a minor in chemistry. Experiments include statistics, calibration of equipment, spectroscopy, volumetric analyses, kinetics, Gran Plot, double endpoint titrations, potentiometric titration, photometric determination of copper, and water hardness. (Prerequisites: (CHEM-172 and CHEM-176) or (CHMG-142 and CHMG-146) or (CHEM-151 and CHEM-155) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: CHMA-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Fall).
1
CHMB-402
Biochemistry I
This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-331
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry I
This course is a rigorous study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. The course will also provide an introduction to chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, alkene, and alkyne reactions. This course will require the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHEM-151 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-335 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHMO-332
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry II
This course is a comprehensive study of the structure, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: aromatic rings, ketones, aldehydes, and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Students will apply their knowledge from CHMO-331 to predict products and derive mechanisms that describe various organic reactions. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMO-335
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Lab I
This course prepares students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab and to carryout reactions covered in the accompanying lecture CHMO-331. (Corequisites: CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Spring).
1
CHMO-336
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Lab II
This course teaches students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab and reactions covered in the accompanying lecture CHMO-332. This course will also help students to solidify the concepts taught in lecture and perform qualitative analysis of unknown compounds. (Prerequisites: CHMO-335 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-332 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Spring).
1
MATH-219
Multivariable Calculus (General Education)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Third Year
CHMA-311
Instrumental Analysis
This course presents a preliminary treatment of instrumental theory and technique. The course will cover the theory and implementation of spectroscopic, mass spectrometric, and chemical separations instrumentation and techniques. Instrumental techniques include: atomic and molecular emission and absorption and emission spectroscopies, atomic and molecular mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography. (Prerequisites: CHMA-211 or CHMA-161 or CHMG-142 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMA-315 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMA-315
Instrumental Analysis Lab
This course presents hands-on experience with modern chemical instrumentation including a number of spectroscopic techniques, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and other. The course will cover the theory of operation of each instrument, their capabilities, and their limitations. Students will perform experiments utilizing modern chemical instrumentation and gain experience in analyzing data and presenting experimental results. (Prerequisites: CHMA-211 or CHMA-161 or CHMG-142 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMA-311 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
CHMP-341
Physical Chemistry I
This course provides fundamental concepts, and organizing principles, applied in all aspects of chemistry and related fields. A rigorous and detailed explanation of central, unifying concepts in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics will be developed. Mathematical models that provide quantitative predictions will be described for thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. These contain the mathematical underpinnings to concepts applied in analytical, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry courses, as well as more advanced topics in chemistry. The course will cover: gases, temperature, energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics, entropy and the Second and Third laws, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, criteria for equilibrium and spontaneity, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetic molecular theory, chemical kinetics, and irreversible processes in solution. (Prerequisites: MATH-219 and PHYS-211 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
3
CHMP-342
Physical Chemistry II
This course provides fundamental concepts, and organizing principles of quantum chemistry, applied in all aspects of chemistry and related fields. A rigorous and detailed explanation of central, unifying concepts in quantum chemistry will be developed. Mathematical models will be described, which contain the underpinnings to concepts applied in analytical, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry courses, as well as more advanced topics in chemistry. The course will cover: Postulates and formulation of Schrödinger equations, Operators and matrix elements, Solutions for the particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillators, the rigid rotor and angular momentum, the hydrogen atom; spin, the Pauli principle. Approximation methods will be described for the helium atom, the hydrogen molecule ion, the hydrogen molecule, Diatomic molecules. Linear combinations of atomic orbitals and computational chemistry will be introduced and quantum chemistry applications will be provided. In addition this course will cover standard thermodynamic functions expressed in partition functions and spectroscopy and light-matter interaction (Prerequisite: CHMP-341 or CHMP-441 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHMP-345
Physical Chemistry Lab I
1
CHMP-346
Experimental Physical Chemistry 
An advanced experiential course based on the use of experimental data, theory, simple computer programming and computational demonstration to apply and test quantum mechanical models, which explain chemical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on connecting established theories to experimental evidence, and on presenting in a formal technical report. (Prerequisites: CHMP-345 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMP-342 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
1
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
Advanced Chemistry Elective§
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2
3
 
Open Electives
3
Fourth Year
CHEM-401
Macromolecular Supramolecular and Nanoscale Chemistry
Macromolecular, supramolecular, and nanoscale chemistry content includes three broad areas such as: synthetic polymers, supramolecular aggregates, and/or meso- or nanoscale materials. Basic synthetic approaches for the preparation of MSN materials such as synthetic polymers, inorganic polymers, framework materials, and nanoparticles. Within each area of these systems, topics include: 1) structure, synthesis and/or preparation, 2) characterization, and 3) physical properties. Course content material discusses important aspects in which large scale chemical systems are significantly different than small molecules. (Prerequisite: CHMO-332 and (CHMP-342 or CHMP-442) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMP-445
Experimental Physical Chemistry (WI-PR)
An advanced laboratory course on the use of wet chemical and instrumental analysis to apply, test and formulate physical and mathematical models to explain chemical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on formulating a scientific argument, supported by experimental evidence and established theories, and presented in a formal technical report. (Prerequisites: CHMP-441 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMP-442 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 7 (Fall, Spring).
3
CHMI-564
Structural Inorganic Chemistry
This course will teach students how the properties of inorganic materials are explained by current theories including group theory, molecular orbital theory, acid-base chemistry and solid state chemistry. The topics discussed in this course include molecular structure, coordination nomenclature and isomerization, symmetry, molecular orbital theory, metallic bonding and ionic bonding. (Prerequisite: CHMO-332 or CHMO-232 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Advanced Chemistry Electives§
6
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Electives
6
 
Open Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
123

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

§ Students must complete 9 credits of Advanced Chemistry credit hours.

Advanced Chemistry Electives List A

Course
CHEM-489
Advanced Special Topics
This is an advanced course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures. Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
CHEM-498
Advanced Chemistry Independent Study
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).
CHEM-531
Climate Change Science, Technology & Policy
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 3rd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMA-621
Advanced Instrumental Analysis Lab
This is a capstone course requiring students to develop experimental protocols involving advanced techniques in instrumental analysis. This course is intended to give an opportunity to develop innovative skills and writing proficiency. Library, literature and textbook research will be required. (Prerequisites: CHMB-405 or CHMP-445 or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lab 6 (Spring).
CHMA-650
Chemical Separations and Mass Spectrometry
This course will teach state of the art chemical separations and methods which are coupled to mass spectroscopy for the modern analysis of pharmaceutical and biotechnology samples in industrial and academic laboratories. These include gas chromatography (GC, GC-MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, LC-MS), solid phase extraction (SPE and SPME), size exclusion/gel permeation (SEC, GPC), and ion exchange chromatography (IXC). Aspects of mass spectroscopy including ionization methods of electron impact (EI), chemical ionization (CI), positive and negative electrospray (ES+, ES-), APCI, and MALDI and techniques involving single and multiple ion/reaction methods (SIM, SRM, MRM) will be included. The separation and analysis of peptides, proteins and pharmaceuticals by LC and LC-MS will be a major focus. Isolation of drug metabolites from serum by SPE followed by HPLC analysis or using size exclusion chromatography to separate biomolecules, or labeling a peptide with a near infrared (NIR) dye are examples of important skills that are learned. (Prerequisites: (CHMG-111 or CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or CHEM-151) and (CHMG-145 or CHEM-155) and (CHMO-231 or CHMO-331) or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
CHMA-670
Advanced Concepts of Environmental Chemistry
This course will build on previous chemistry courses to expand knowledge of biogeochemical cycles, environmental toxicology and applied methods of environmental analysis. The course will be conducted in a workshop format at the graduate level. (Prerequisites: CHMO-231 and CHMO-235 or CHMO-331 and CHMO-335 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMA-711
Advanced Instrumental Analysis
The theory, applications, and limitations of selected instrumental methods in qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis will be discussed. This course is also intended to give an opportunity to develop writing and revising abilities, as well as communication skills. Library, literature, and textbook research will be required. (Prerequisite: CHMA-261 or equivalent course or graduate student standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMA-740
Practical NMR
A graduate level lecture and laboratory course designed to teach a student how to use a Bruker high-resolution NMR spectrometer to perform a variety of chemical analyses. Students are presented a series of brief descriptions of how to perform various functions and experiments on a Bruker NMR. Students then receive hands-on training and perform the experiment. Specific operations taught include: file management, magnet shimming, probe tuning, parameter optimization, pulse sequence development, one-dimensional and two-dimensional acquisitions, variable temperature studies, data processing, diffusion measurements, and measuring relaxation times. This course serves as mechanism to gain different levels of access to the Chemistry Department's NMR spectrometers. (Prerequisites: CHMO-332 or CHMA-221 or equivalent course or graduate standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 5 (Spring).
CHMB-405
Biochemistry Lab
An introduction to the theory and practice of modern experimental biochemical laboratory techniques and concepts. The weekly two-hour lecture provides a theoretical framework for the course and includes a discussion of the properties of biomolecules and how those properties are exploited in the separation and characterization of the molecules. Practical laboratory techniques include the preparation of buffers, centrifugation, chromatography, electrophoretic methods, and UV-visible spectrophotometry as applied to the isolation and characterization of proteins and nucleic acids. The manipulation of genetic material in E. coli will also be executed. This course will be offered in a writing intensive format where the students will write and submit the different sections found in scientific papers (abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion, conclusions, references, figures, tables) in an iterative fashion that will include regular feedback from the instructor. (Prerequisites: CHMB-402 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).
CHMB-495
Advanced Biochemistry Research
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Research (Fall, Spring, Summer).
CHMB-610
Advanced Protein Biochemistry: Structure and Function
This course analyzes protein structure function relationships. Students will investigate how proteins function and how the structure relates to that function. The principles that explain enzyme rate enhancements and mechanistic enzymology will be examined. Additionally, protein superfamilies for phylogenetic relationships will be explored to enhance understanding of protein structure-function relationships. Students will read and discuss the current scientific literature and classic papers. (Prerequisites: CHMB-402 or equivalent course or degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMB-702
Protein Conformation and Dynamics
An advanced study of the structure and function of proteins and enzymes. Biophysical and mechanistic aspects of enzyme function will be examined. Applications of computation to protein structure will also be discussed. (Prerequisites: CHMB-402 or equivalent course or degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMB-704
Advanced Nucleic Acids Biochemistry; Structure and Function
This course will cover nucleic acid structures as determined by NMR and X-ray crystallography and nucleic acid catalysis, especially that of ribozymes. Genomics, specifically whole-genome sequencing papers, will be analyzed. Current RNA topics including the RNA World, Ribozymes, RNAi, and Riboswitches will be discussed. Current DNA topics including Lateral/Horizontal DNA Transfer, Genome Duplication, Alternate Gene Expression and Synthetic Life will also be discussed. (Prerequisites: CHMB-402 or equivalent course or degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
CHMI-351
Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry
This course covers descriptive inorganic reactions in terms of periodic trends. Topics will include nucleosynthesis and the birth of the universe, applications used in large-scale industrial processes and their environmental impacts, nanostructured materials, and bonding theory will also be discussed. A detailed study of solid-state chemistry and structure will also be addressed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
CHMI-565
Preparative Inorganic Chemistry Lab
This course provides a laboratory environment for students to learn the strategies necessary to synthesize a wide variety of inorganic compounds and organometallic complexes. Students will learn how to plan and develop synthetic protocols in both atmospheric and inert reaction processes. This course is intended to give an opportunity to develop innovative skills and writing proficiency. Library, literature and textbook research will be required. (Prerequisites: CHMI-351 or equivalent course.) Lab 8 (Spring).
CHMO-535
Advanced Techniques in Organic Synthesis
This advanced lab course teaches students to perform advanced techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. Techniques covered include working under inert atmospheres, working with air-sensitive reagents, using syringes, purification methods, and carrying on material for subsequent synthetic steps. Characterization of synthesized compounds will be conducted. (Prerequisite: CHMO-335 or CHMO-235 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Spring).
CHMO-636
Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds
This course covers the theory and application of proton, carbon-13, and correlation nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and mass spectrometry for organic structure determination. (Prerequisites: CHMO-332 with a grade of C- or better or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMO-637
Advanced Organic Chemistry
This course will revisit many of the reactions covered in the first year of organic chemistry with an emphasis on stereochemical control. Students will be introduced to the technique of retrosynthesis. The course will introduce more reactions with an emphasis on current topics from the literature. Students will hone their skills in writing electron pushing mechanisms and the use of protecting groups while practicing the art of designing synthetic strategies for making natural products. (Prerequisites: Graduate standing or CHMO-332 or CHMO-232 with a grade of B or better or equivalent course.Grad or CHMO-332 or CHMO) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMO-640
Mechanisms of Drug Interactions
Drugs are naturally occurring or synthetic substances that upon exposure to a living organism form complexes with biological targets. These complexes result in a characteristic pharmacological effect which alter physiological functions or counteract environmental insults. The goal of this course is to systematically study drug discovery, lead optimization, drug-receptor interactions, and bioavailability. Historically important drug classes and their mechanism of action will receive special consideration. (Prerequisites: CHMO-637 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMO-710
Literature Exploration of Organic Synthesis
This course will be a survey of the recent literature in organic chemistry with a focus on the chemistry concerning the synthesis of natural products and/or methodology towards synthesizing natural products. During each week of the course a student is selected to lead a discussion based on an article from a premier journal. This course may be repeated for credit. (Prerequisites: CHMO-637 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
CHMO-739
Advanced Physical Organic Chemistry
This course covers topics in physical organic chemistry including: techniques for elucidation of mechanism (kinetic, and linear free energy relationships); isotope effects; molecular orbital theory; and electrocyclic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMO-332 and CHMP-441 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMO-750
Survey of Organic Named Reactions
The course will explore a litany of named organic reactions with an emphasis on the reaction mechanisms. Learning the mechanism to the named reactions is a classical way to teach organic chemistry students the rules of mechanism writing. Having a dictionary type recall of the named reactions is a fundamental tool for success in organic chemistry. This course will introduce the students to new reagents and reactions by surveying named organic reactions with an emphasis on the reaction mechanisms. The goal of the course is to generate an understanding of the reaction mechanism and use that understanding to predict the reactivity of substrates in organic chemical reactions. (Prerequisites: Graduate standing or CHMO-332 or CHMO-232 with a grade of B or better or equivalent course.Grad or CHMO-332 or CHMO) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
CHMP-751
Colloid & Interface Science
The parallel growth of nanotechnology and a molecular perspective in the medical and life sciences has focused attention on the colloidal domain structures of dimension 1 nm to 1 mm. This course will introduce colloid and interface science that will allow for an appreciation of the role of colloids in biological systems, industrial processes and commercial products. (Prerequisites: CHMP-441 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMP-752
Molecular Photophysics and Photochemistry
This course provides a comprehensive and clear description of the concepts and principles of molecular photophysical processes and photochemistry. The practical methods required for associated photophysical characterization and measurement are presented along with important applications of molecular photonics in cutting-edge research. A review of quantum mechanics is given with the photochemist in mind such that the student is encouraged to make more use of quantum mechanical terms, quantities and concepts. The course covers the interaction of light with molecular orbitals to form an excited state, and its subsequent de-activation. Applications such as lasers, spectroscopy, photoinduced charge transfer in modern organic photovoltaics and photosynthesis are described. (Prerequisites: CHMP-442 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMP-753
Computational Chemistry
This course will introduce students to an in-depth investigation into the computational theories and applications used to model complex physical and chemical phenomena. Computational methods are used to provide synergy linking experiment with theory involving such chemical processes as reaction mechanisms, docking, energy transfer and conformational conversions. Predicting spectral and thermodynamic properties of molecular systems and ensembles will also be treated. (Prerequisites: CHMP-442 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHPO-706
Polymer Synthesis
This course is mainly about the chemistry applied to synthesize polymers. It includes initially the introduction on the naming and classification and some relevant properties of polymers. We will then discuss the two main methods of synthesizing polymers, namely step-growth polymerization and chain-addition polymerization. Among the step-growth polymerizations, syntheses of different types of polyesters, polyamides, polyurethanes etc. including the reaction mechanisms will be covered. Under chain-addition polymerizations, those by four different initiators (radical, cationic, anionic or coordinative) will be explained. The mechanisms of these types of reactions will be discussed in more detail and, where feasible, effects of stereochemistry or regiochemistry will be included. In addition to the commodity polymers in each category, also the syntheses of some specialty step-growth and chain addition polymers will be included. A few examples of reactions to obtain more reactive monomers will be mentioned. Some specialty type of polymerizations, such as living free radical types, or ring-opening and cyclization polymerizations, will also be discussed. We will include examples of post-polymerization reactions. Finally, we will discuss methods to resolve environmental issues with polymers by developing more sustainable polymers. (Prerequisite: CHMG-201 or MTSE-602 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHPO-707
Polymer Chemistry II
This course further investigates the contemporary chemistry of high molecular weight polymers and macromolecules and the relationships between their structure, functionality, and utility. The course focuses on fundamental principles that govern swollen gels and soft matter. Mechanisms of the formation of polymers containing heteroatoms in their chains are examined in detail. Specific attention is given to the synthesis of polymers of controlled architecture and self-assembly, and of polymers and macromolecules. Dendrimers, hyper-branched polymers, functional polymers, polymeric reagents, polyelectrolytes, and biopolymers are also discussed. (Prerequisites: CHPO-706 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

Combined Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's Degrees

The curriculum below outlines the typical course sequence(s) for combined accelerated degrees available with this bachelor's degree.

Chemistry, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHEM-171
Advanced General Chemistry I (General Education – Elective)
Advanced General Chemistry designed for aspiring chemical professionals. Students will learn the fundamental concepts that support a modern understanding of chemistry. Atomic and molecular structures are presented and investigated using quantum mechanics. The relationship between quantum mechanics, molecular structure, and material properties is emphasized. (Co-requisites: CHEM-175 and (MATH-171 or MATH-181) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHEM-175
Advanced General Chemistry I Lab (General Education – Elective)
This course provides an introduction to a modern chemical laboratory and complements CHEM-171 lecture material through the use of experimentation. Emphasis is placed on laboratory safety, general laboratory practices, and the use of instrumentation to aid in the understanding of concepts. Topics will include keeping a lab notebook, introduction to Excel, Avogadro’s number, atomic and molecular structure, and thermochemistry. (Co-requisite: CHEM-171 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
CHEM-172
Advanced General Chemistry II 
Advanced General Chemistry course for aspiring chemical professionals. Students will learn the fundamental concepts that support a modern understanding of chemistry. The relationship between chemical energy and the physical processes of systems is emphasized. Chemical reactions are discussed from a thermodynamic and kinetic perspective. (Prerequisites: CHEM-171 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHEM-176 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHEM-176
Advanced General Chemistry II Lab
A continuation of Advanced General Chemistry I Lab, this course complements CHEM-172 lecture material through experimentation. Emphasis is placed on laboratory techniques, analysis of results, and formal scientific reporting. Topics include chemical kinetics, pH indicators and buffers, measurement of pH, and extraction of copper from copper wire. Special topics to be included. (Prerequisites: CHEM-175 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHEM-172 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Spring).
1
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
CHMA-211
Quantitative Analysis
This course will introduce students to quantitative methods. The course will cover gravimetric techniques, equilibria, statistical methods, and solution chemistry. In addition, equilibrium for polyprotic acids, electrochemistry and potentiometry will be discussed. (Prerequisites: (CHEM-172 and CHEM-176) or (CHMG-142 and CHMG-146) or (CHEM-151 and CHEM-155) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: CHMA-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMA-215
Analytical Methods Lab
This laboratory is designed for chemistry and biochemistry majors or those interested in pursuing a minor in chemistry. Experiments include statistics, calibration of equipment, spectroscopy, volumetric analyses, kinetics, Gran Plot, double endpoint titrations, potentiometric titration, photometric determination of copper, and water hardness. (Prerequisites: (CHEM-172 and CHEM-176) or (CHMG-142 and CHMG-146) or (CHEM-151 and CHEM-155) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: CHMA-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Fall).
1
CHMB-402
Biochemistry I
This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-331
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry I
This course is a rigorous study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. The course will also provide an introduction to chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, alkene, and alkyne reactions. This course will require the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHEM-151 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-335 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHMO-336
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Lab I
This course teaches students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab and reactions covered in the accompanying lecture CHMO-332. This course will also help students to solidify the concepts taught in lecture and perform qualitative analysis of unknown compounds. (Prerequisites: CHMO-335 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-332 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Spring).
1
CHMO-332
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry II
This course is a comprehensive study of the structure, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: aromatic rings, ketones, aldehydes, and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Students will apply their knowledge from CHMO-331 to predict products and derive mechanisms that describe various organic reactions. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMO-336
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Lab II
This course teaches students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab and reactions covered in the accompanying lecture CHMO-332. This course will also help students to solidify the concepts taught in lecture and perform qualitative analysis of unknown compounds. (Prerequisites: CHMO-335 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-332 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Spring).
1
MATH-219
General Education – Elective: Multivariable Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
PHYS-211
General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Third Year
CHEM-499
Chemistry Co-op (summer)*
This course is a cooperative education experience for undergraduate chemistry students. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
CHMA-361
Instrumental Analysis
3
CHMA-315
Instrumental Analysis Lab
This course presents hands-on experience with modern chemical instrumentation including a number of spectroscopic techniques, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and other. The course will cover the theory of operation of each instrument, their capabilities, and their limitations. Students will perform experiments utilizing modern chemical instrumentation and gain experience in analyzing data and presenting experimental results. (Prerequisites: CHMA-211 or CHMA-161 or CHMG-142 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMA-311 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
CHMP-341
Physical Chemistry I
This course provides fundamental concepts, and organizing principles, applied in all aspects of chemistry and related fields. A rigorous and detailed explanation of central, unifying concepts in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics will be developed. Mathematical models that provide quantitative predictions will be described for thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. These contain the mathematical underpinnings to concepts applied in analytical, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry courses, as well as more advanced topics in chemistry. The course will cover: gases, temperature, energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics, entropy and the Second and Third laws, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, criteria for equilibrium and spontaneity, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetic molecular theory, chemical kinetics, and irreversible processes in solution. (Prerequisites: MATH-219 and PHYS-211 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
3
CHMP-342
Physical Chemistry II
This course provides fundamental concepts, and organizing principles of quantum chemistry, applied in all aspects of chemistry and related fields. A rigorous and detailed explanation of central, unifying concepts in quantum chemistry will be developed. Mathematical models will be described, which contain the underpinnings to concepts applied in analytical, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry courses, as well as more advanced topics in chemistry. The course will cover: Postulates and formulation of Schrödinger equations, Operators and matrix elements, Solutions for the particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillators, the rigid rotor and angular momentum, the hydrogen atom; spin, the Pauli principle. Approximation methods will be described for the helium atom, the hydrogen molecule ion, the hydrogen molecule, Diatomic molecules. Linear combinations of atomic orbitals and computational chemistry will be introduced and quantum chemistry applications will be provided. In addition this course will cover standard thermodynamic functions expressed in partition functions and spectroscopy and light-matter interaction (Prerequisite: CHMP-341 or CHMP-441 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHMP-345
Physical Chemistry Lab I
1
CHMP-345
Experimental Physical Chemistry (WI-PR)
1
PHYS-212
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective: University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
Advanced Chemistry Elective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Electives
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2
3
 
Open Electives
3
Fourth Year
Choose one of the following:
6
 
   Graduate Chemistry Focus Course (Project track)
 
   CHEM-790
   Research & Thesis (Thesis track)
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
CHEM-401
Macromolecular, Supramolecular, Nanoscale
Macromolecular, supramolecular, and nanoscale chemistry content includes three broad areas such as: synthetic polymers, supramolecular aggregates, and/or meso- or nanoscale materials. Basic synthetic approaches for the preparation of MSN materials such as synthetic polymers, inorganic polymers, framework materials, and nanoparticles. Within each area of these systems, topics include: 1) structure, synthesis and/or preparation, 2) characterization, and 3) physical properties. Course content material discusses important aspects in which large scale chemical systems are significantly different than small molecules. (Prerequisite: CHMO-332 and (CHMP-342 or CHMP-442) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHEM-500
Experiential Learning Requirement for Chemistry and Biochemistry Programs
The experiential learning (EL) requirement may be fulfilled through a variety of methods including co-op, undergraduate research, summer research experiences, study abroad relevant to the major, designated EL courses, etc. All experiences must be approved by the Department Head or Associate Department Head of SCMS. Lecture (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
CHEM-670
Graduate Chemistry Writing
Chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves in writing. This course is designed to develop these skills. Students will learn how to write a curriculum vitae, resume, laboratory overview, short and long research abstracts, and scientific research articles using the various formats and styles used by chemists. An integral part of the writing of a research article is the initial formulation of the research hypothesis and design of experiments to test the hypothesis. This course will also review and stress the importance of these components. (Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
CHEM-771
Graduate Chemistry Seminar I
Chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar I is the first in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires the students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries. Additionally, each student will present a seminar on their proposed research that also summarizes the scientific literature related to the research. (Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
CHEM-772
Graduate Chemistry Seminar II
Chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar II is the second in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires the students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries. (Prerequisites: CHEM-771 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Spring).
1
CHMI-664
Modern Inorganic Chemistry
This course will apply molecular structure and bonding theory to explain inorganic coordinate complex structure and function, and coordination reaction chemistry. The topics discussed in this course are molecular structure, symmetry, bonding theory, d-block electronic structure and properties, and the reaction mechanisms controlling coordinate complexes. Students will be expected to translate the concepts learned in class to solving analytical and structural analysis problems inorganic systems. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMP-445
Experimental Physical Chemistry
An advanced laboratory course on the use of wet chemical and instrumental analysis to apply, test and formulate physical and mathematical models to explain chemical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on formulating a scientific argument, supported by experimental evidence and established theories, and presented in a formal technical report. (Prerequisites: CHMP-441 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMP-442 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 7 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Electives
6
 
Open Electives
6
Fifth Year
CHEM-773
Graduate Chemistry Seminar III
Chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar III is the third in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries throughout the four semesters. Additionally, each student must invite, organize, host, and introduce an external seminar speaker to participate in the Chemistry Seminar Series. (Prerequisites: CHEM-772 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
1
CHEM-774
Graduate Chemistry Seminar IV
Professional chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar IV is the fourth in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires the students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries. Additionally, each student will present a seminar summarizing their thesis research at RIT which serves as the public portion of their thesis defense. (Prerequisites: CHEM-773 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Spring).
1
 
Approved Chemistry Graduate Courses
12
Choose one of the following:
4
   CHEM-780
   Chemistry Project
Chemistry project accomplished by the MS student for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the project advisor. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Project (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   CHEM-790
   Research & Thesis
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
144

*Chemistry Co-op is for co-op track students only.

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Chemistry, BS degree/Materials Science and Engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHEM-171
Advanced General Chemistry I (General Education – Elective)
Advanced General Chemistry designed for aspiring chemical professionals. Students will learn the fundamental concepts that support a modern understanding of chemistry. Atomic and molecular structures are presented and investigated using quantum mechanics. The relationship between quantum mechanics, molecular structure, and material properties is emphasized. (Co-requisites: CHEM-175 and (MATH-171 or MATH-181) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHEM-175
Advanced General Chemistry I Lab(General Education – Elective)
This course provides an introduction to a modern chemical laboratory and complements CHEM-171 lecture material through the use of experimentation. Emphasis is placed on laboratory safety, general laboratory practices, and the use of instrumentation to aid in the understanding of concepts. Topics will include keeping a lab notebook, introduction to Excel, Avogadro’s number, atomic and molecular structure, and thermochemistry. (Co-requisite: CHEM-171 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
CHEM-172
Advanced General Chemistry II (General Education – Elective)
Advanced General Chemistry course for aspiring chemical professionals. Students will learn the fundamental concepts that support a modern understanding of chemistry. The relationship between chemical energy and the physical processes of systems is emphasized. Chemical reactions are discussed from a thermodynamic and kinetic perspective. (Prerequisites: CHEM-171 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHEM-176 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHEM-176
Advanced General Chemistry II Lab(General Education – Elective)
A continuation of Advanced General Chemistry I Lab, this course complements CHEM-172 lecture material through experimentation. Emphasis is placed on laboratory techniques, analysis of results, and formal scientific reporting. Topics include chemical kinetics, pH indicators and buffers, measurement of pH, and extraction of copper from copper wire. Special topics to be included. (Prerequisites: CHEM-175 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHEM-172 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Spring).
1
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
CHMA-211
Quantitative Analysis
This course will introduce students to quantitative methods. The course will cover gravimetric techniques, equilibria, statistical methods, and solution chemistry. In addition, equilibrium for polyprotic acids, electrochemistry and potentiometry will be discussed. (Prerequisites: (CHEM-172 and CHEM-176) or (CHMG-142 and CHMG-146) or (CHEM-151 and CHEM-155) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: CHMA-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMA-215
Analytical Methods Lab
This laboratory is designed for chemistry and biochemistry majors or those interested in pursuing a minor in chemistry. Experiments include statistics, calibration of equipment, spectroscopy, volumetric analyses, kinetics, Gran Plot, double endpoint titrations, potentiometric titration, photometric determination of copper, and water hardness. (Prerequisites: (CHEM-172 and CHEM-176) or (CHMG-142 and CHMG-146) or (CHEM-151 and CHEM-155) or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: CHMA-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Fall).
1
CHMB-402
Biochemistry I
This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMO-331
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry I
This course is a rigorous study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. The course will also provide an introduction to chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, alkene, and alkyne reactions. This course will require the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHEM-151 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-335 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHMO-335
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Lab I
This course prepares students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab and to carryout reactions covered in the accompanying lecture CHMO-331. (Corequisites: CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Spring).
1
CHMO-332
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry II
This course is a comprehensive study of the structure, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: aromatic rings, ketones, aldehydes, and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Students will apply their knowledge from CHMO-331 to predict products and derive mechanisms that describe various organic reactions. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMO-336
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry Lab II
This course teaches students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab and reactions covered in the accompanying lecture CHMO-332. This course will also help students to solidify the concepts taught in lecture and perform qualitative analysis of unknown compounds. (Prerequisites: CHMO-335 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-332 or equivalent course.) Lab 4 (Spring).
1
MATH-219
Multivariable Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Third Year
CHMA-311
Instrumental Analysis
This course presents a preliminary treatment of instrumental theory and technique. The course will cover the theory and implementation of spectroscopic, mass spectrometric, and chemical separations instrumentation and techniques. Instrumental techniques include: atomic and molecular emission and absorption and emission spectroscopies, atomic and molecular mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography. (Prerequisites: CHMA-211 or CHMA-161 or CHMG-142 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMA-315 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMA-315
Instrumental Analysis Lab
This course presents hands-on experience with modern chemical instrumentation including a number of spectroscopic techniques, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and other. The course will cover the theory of operation of each instrument, their capabilities, and their limitations. Students will perform experiments utilizing modern chemical instrumentation and gain experience in analyzing data and presenting experimental results. (Prerequisites: CHMA-211 or CHMA-161 or CHMG-142 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMA-311 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
CHMP-341
Physical Chemistry I
This course provides fundamental concepts, and organizing principles, applied in all aspects of chemistry and related fields. A rigorous and detailed explanation of central, unifying concepts in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics will be developed. Mathematical models that provide quantitative predictions will be described for thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. These contain the mathematical underpinnings to concepts applied in analytical, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry courses, as well as more advanced topics in chemistry. The course will cover: gases, temperature, energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics, entropy and the Second and Third laws, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, criteria for equilibrium and spontaneity, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetic molecular theory, chemical kinetics, and irreversible processes in solution. (Prerequisites: MATH-219 and PHYS-211 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
3
CHMP-342
Physical Chemistry II
This course provides fundamental concepts, and organizing principles of quantum chemistry, applied in all aspects of chemistry and related fields. A rigorous and detailed explanation of central, unifying concepts in quantum chemistry will be developed. Mathematical models will be described, which contain the underpinnings to concepts applied in analytical, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry courses, as well as more advanced topics in chemistry. The course will cover: Postulates and formulation of Schrödinger equations, Operators and matrix elements, Solutions for the particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillators, the rigid rotor and angular momentum, the hydrogen atom; spin, the Pauli principle. Approximation methods will be described for the helium atom, the hydrogen molecule ion, the hydrogen molecule, Diatomic molecules. Linear combinations of atomic orbitals and computational chemistry will be introduced and quantum chemistry applications will be provided. In addition this course will cover standard thermodynamic functions expressed in partition functions and spectroscopy and light-matter interaction (Prerequisite: CHMP-341 or CHMP-441 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHMP-345
Physical Chemistry I Lab
1
CHMP-346
Physical Chemistry II Lab
An advanced experiential course based on the use of experimental data, theory, simple computer programming and computational demonstration to apply and test quantum mechanical models, which explain chemical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on connecting established theories to experimental evidence, and on presenting in a formal technical report. (Prerequisites: CHMP-345 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMP-342 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
1
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
Advanced Chemistry Elective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2
3
 
General Education – Electives
3
 
Open Electives
3
Fourth Year
CHEM-401
Macromolecular, Supramolecular, Nanoscale
Macromolecular, supramolecular, and nanoscale chemistry content includes three broad areas such as: synthetic polymers, supramolecular aggregates, and/or meso- or nanoscale materials. Basic synthetic approaches for the preparation of MSN materials such as synthetic polymers, inorganic polymers, framework materials, and nanoparticles. Within each area of these systems, topics include: 1) structure, synthesis and/or preparation, 2) characterization, and 3) physical properties. Course content material discusses important aspects in which large scale chemical systems are significantly different than small molecules. (Prerequisite: CHMO-332 and (CHMP-342 or CHMP-442) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
CHMI-564
Structural Inorganic Chemistry
This course will teach students how the properties of inorganic materials are explained by current theories including group theory, molecular orbital theory, acid-base chemistry and solid state chemistry. The topics discussed in this course include molecular structure, coordination nomenclature and isomerization, symmetry, molecular orbital theory, metallic bonding and ionic bonding. (Prerequisite: CHMO-332 or CHMO-232 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
CHMP-445
Experimental Physical Chemistry (WI-PR)
An advanced laboratory course on the use of wet chemical and instrumental analysis to apply, test and formulate physical and mathematical models to explain chemical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on formulating a scientific argument, supported by experimental evidence and established theories, and presented in a formal technical report. (Prerequisites: CHMP-441 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: CHMP-442 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 7 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Advanced Chemistry Elective/MTSE Graduate Elective§
6
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Electives
6
 
Open Electives
6
Fifth Year
MTSE-601
Materials Science
This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties necessary for the development of new materials. Topics include atomic and crystal structure, crystalline defects, diffusion, theories, strengthening mechanisms, ferrous alloys, cast irons, structure of ceramics and polymeric materials and corrosion principles. Term paper on materials topic. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MTSE-704
Theoretical Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
This course includes the treatment of vector analysis, special functions, waves, and fields; Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, and their applications. Selected topics of interest in electrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and statistical mechanics will also be discussed. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MTSE-705
Experimental Techniques
The course will introduce the students to laboratory equipment for hardness testing, impact testing, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction, SEM, and thermal treatment of metallic materials. Experiments illustrating the characterization of high molecular weight organic polymers will be performed. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lab 3 (Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
9
   MTSE-777
   Graduate Project plus two MTSE Graduate Electives§
This course is a capstone project using research facilities available inside or outside of RIT. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Project .
 
   MTSE-790
   Research & Thesis
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
 
MTSE Graduate Elective§
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
144

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

§ Please see advisor for complete list of elective choices.