Generative AI in Education

About

Since November of 2022 The Center for Teaching and Learning (CT) has taken a keen interest in generative AI and its potential impact on teaching and learning in higher education. In the spring 2023, faculty were polled on their experiences which helped to inform programming needs for the next academic year. Over the 2023 summer, the CTL team has been updating and refreshing web based resources available to faculty and partnered with key faculty, graduate and undergraduate Deans, the Vice Provost and Chair for Critical Thinking as thought partners in a fast moving environment. During this fall term, a number of activities for faculty are ongoing including a webinar series, communities of practice, teaching circles, an in person symposium for faculty, and access to staff and faculty fellow experts on AI related issues.

CTL has a variety of resources and opportunities for faculty to share their experiences and practices with using generative AI in teaching.

Events

RIT has a variety of opportunities for faculty to continue discussions and sharing of information on strategies for incorporating generative AI uses into your teaching.

Hosted by Amanda Bao, Civil Engineering Technology and Environmental Management and Safety, CET; and co-hosted by Garret Arcoraci, School of Information, GCIS

Generative AI has been rapidly spread into higher education. While the power of generative AI initially caused some panic about academic integrity, the positive impact of generative AI on STEM fields has received more and more attention. For example, generative AI has been adopted in the construction industry to provide technical project support and best practices, as well as offering job training and education. 

The rapid growth and implementation of technology and AI in higher education is the trend, and there is no going back. It is important for higher education instructors in the AI era to effectively implement generative AI tools to enhance students’ learning experience. In this teaching circle, participants will share and discuss their experiences and teaching practices with generative AI-powered tools, either success stories or lessons learned. 

This teaching circle aims to foster discussions and collaborations on generative AI in all of RIT’s STEM fields, explore potential opportunities for grant applications, and summarize effective practices in teaching and learning with generative AI.

The schedule for this Teaching Circle is listed below. Meetings will take place in-person on campus. 

  • Friday, September 8, 12:00-12:50pm
  • Friday, September 22, 12:00-12:50pm
  • Friday, October 6, 12:00-12:50pm
  • Friday, November 3, 12:00-12:50pm
  • Friday, November 17, 12:00-12:50pm
  • Friday, December 1, 12:00-12:50pm

If you would like to join this circle, email Amanda Bao to obtain location information.

Led by Keith Weber, Management Information Systems, SCB

This circle will investigate how our teaching of software tools and methodologies might evolve as generative AI (genAI) is adopted in contemporary organizations. We will consider how genAI might transform the environment for us as teachers, for our students as learners, and for our graduates as workers.

While we acknowledge the importance of genAI's potential risks, public policy, and ethical implications, this circle will not focus on these issues. Similarly, topics such as plagiarism, exam integrity, or the use of genAI for instruction preparation, delivery, or grading will not be the center of our discussions. These vital subjects are explored in other academic and professional forums and discussing them here would divert our focus. This circle supplements, rather than replaces, those discussions.

This circle is designed for instructors preparing students for technological roles impacted by genAI, particularly (but not limited to) those involving systems design and development, programming, engineering, math, statistics, analytics, data science, economics, finance, digital marketing, and content creation. We will forecast, discuss, and analyze:

How our students can better understand genAI and integrate it into their work

  • How this new level of abstraction will eliminate or elevate job roles
  • Emerging software tools, approaches, and methodologies in our fields
  • Student insights on genAI and methods to stimulate those discussions
  •  Preparing students to prevent potential displacement by genAI

We will meet using Zoom five times during the Fall semester. We will poll participants to determine the most suitable meeting times. Each session will feature a subtopic and begin with a short introduction to seed the discussion. Participants are encouraged, though not required, to provide examples from their own teaching. 

The schedule for this Teaching Circle is listed below. Meetings will take place on Zoom, and attendance is not required for all meetings. 

  • Friday October 6 from 10-11 am
  • Friday October 20 from 10-11 am
  • Friday November 3 from 10-11 am
  • Friday November 17 from 10-11 am
  • Friday December 1 from 10-11 am

If you would like to join this circle, email Keith Weber to obtain the Zoom meeting link.

    Join us for an open discussion on the influence of generative AI on your teaching methods to determine what support you need, as well as topics for future programming. 

    This session is intended for RIT faculty, including adjuncts and teaching assistants. Participants should request access services if needed.

    Register for this check-in session

    Join us for an open discussion on the influence of generative AI on your teaching methods to determine what support you need, as well as topics for future programming.

    This session is intended for RIT faculty, including adjuncts and teaching assistants. Participants should request access services if needed.

    Register for this check-in session

    RIT Faculty experts, across various disciplines, will showcase their innovations with generative AI in the form of lightning talks, consisting of an overview and demonstration of the tool in action, followed immediately by Q&A. This session will be offered on Zoom.

    The Summer Institute on Teaching & Learning will hold a multi-day event which focuses on RIT's response to AI in higher education, and be co-sponsored between the offices of The Center for Teaching and Learning and the Vice President for Research.

    Past Events

    In this workshop, participants will experience how artificial intelligence tools can help students, writers, and researchers extend their cognition (Clark & Chalmers, 1998). Through on-screen demonstrations and a series of scaffolded group activities using ChatGPT, teams will partially complete 3 stages of an inquiry-based research process common to assignments in Writing Intensive (WI) courses:

    1. developing research questions, 
    2. analyzing sources, and 
    3. acknowledging sources of information. 

    There will be opportunities for evaluating the benefits and challenges of using AI in research writing, as well as a concluding discussion about the personal, professional, and institutional ethics of AI-assisted writing and research as a scholarly method. Participants should bring their laptops in order to fully participate in the activities. Click here to register for this workshop. 

    Led by Phil Shaw, Senior Lecturer in the University Writing Program, Academic Affairs & Faculty Fellow for Gateway Course Student Success, Center for Teaching and Learning.

    They symposium explored a range of opportunities and challenges that generative artificial intelligence presents in higher education. Jeffrey Allan, Director of Nazareth University’s Institute for Responsible Technology delivered a keynote address on How Generative AI Will Transform Teaching, Learning, and Research. Afterwards, attendees participated in collaborative exercises with colleagues discussion the following:

    • Benefits to Educators
    • Benefits to Students
    • Challenges & Responsible Use

    The results of this work are currently being evaluated and key findings will be released to the RIT Community in the near future.

    Join the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) for a faculty panel on the impact of generative artificial intelligence on teaching and learning in higher education. Faculty members from various disciplines will address a range of topics including preparing students for generative AI in the workplace, incorporating generative AI into courses, and the use of generative AI to help accelerate and improve the teaching process.

    Panelists:

    • Neil Hair (moderator), Center for Teaching and Learning, and Saunders College of Business
    • Liz Lawley, Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences
    • Juan Noguera, College of Arts and Design
    • Esa Rantanen, College of Liberal Arts
    • Jennifer Schneider, Eugene Fram Chair, and College of Engineering Technology
    • Phil Shaw, University Writing Program

    View Event Recording
    (requires RIT Authentication

    Resources

    FAQs

    RIT’s Center for Teaching and Learning has compiled FAQs about how to reflect upon and adapt your current teaching approaches and practices in light of quickly developing generative AI capabilities. 

    Read the FAQs

    Community of Practice on Generative AI

    We begin a new Community of Practice (CoP) focused on sharing thoughts related to the impacts of Generative Artificial Intelligence (G-AI). G-AI CoP builds a community of faculty and staff critical thinking interest group focusing on the creation, application and implications of G-AI across our teaching, learning and our world.

    View Community of Practice on Generative AI
    (requires RIT Authentication)

    Share your Perspective

    Take the Generative AI Faculty Insights Survey on Generative AI in Education. This survey is designed to gauge faculty’s perspective on generative AI and use of generative AI over the fall semester.

    Take the survey

    Meet with a CTL staff member

    Meet with a CTL staff member to share your perspective and uses of generative AI, and to discuss questions and approaches to implications of generative AI content in your teaching and learning activities.

    Meet with a CTL Staff Member

    Speak with a Faculty Fellow

    The Faculty Fellows program is a collaborative community of faculty who seek to advance RIT’s strategic goals in the area of teaching and learning within college-based disciplines, diversity equity & inclusion, gateway course student success and new this fall generative AI. Faculty Fellows are available to work with RIT faculty to support their development of a range of pedagogies and teaching strategies.

    The Faculty Fellow in Generative AI will partner with CTL staff and RIT faculty to support the development of a range of pedagogies and teaching strategies. The successful applicant is expected to have extensive experience across a broad range of Generative AI platforms and a willingness to partner with and support hands on training for faculty across all disciplines.

    Meet with a Faculty Fellow

    Slack Workspace

    Join this Slack workspace specifically on the topic of generative AI, with separate channels for various topics, ranging from ethics to language models. It’s open to the entire RIT community.

    Join the RIT Generative AI Slack Workspace

    Academic Integrity

    RIT is working with various governance groups to update the university's Academic Integrity Policy D08.0. Further conversations with faculty will take place throughout the Fall semester.


    Share your Perspective

    Take the Generative AI Faculty Insights Survey on Generative AI in Education. This survey is designed to gauge faculty’s perspective on generative AI and use of generative AI over the fall semester.

    Take the survey