Laboratory Science Technology Associate of applied science degree

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Overview

The laboratory science technology major, with its foundation of course sequences in chemistry, biology, and instrumental analysis, was developed primarily from an industry perspective to prepare students for employment as laboratory technicians. The major has several significant factors that set it apart, including the application of real-world analyses and a state-of-the-art instrumentation laboratory. Graduates are prepared to work in a broad range of fields, including chemical, biological, biotechnical, pharmaceutical, environmental, industrial, forensic, and food analysis. This program is only available to students seeking admission to the National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

Students earning an AAS degree have the option of finding employment or continuing to work toward a baccalaureate degree. Under the program’s agreement with RIT's College of Science, individuals who maintain a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher may enroll in a bachelor's degree program in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, biotechnology & molecular bioscience, or environmental science. Students also have the option of entering RIT's School of Individualized Study to complete a BS degree in applied arts and science. For more information, please visit http://www.ntid.rit.edu/scimath/a-plus-b-lst.

On-the-job responsibilities

Technicians are involved with the collection and preparation of samples and standards. They also perform instrumental, volumetric, gravimetric, and biological analyses. Additional job responsibilities may include the interpretation and reporting of experimental results and data.

Places of employment

The major prepares graduates for technical jobs in municipal, public, private, and industrial laboratories.

Prerequisites

English—AAS: Placement in a First Year Writing course, such as FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150). Students typically enter First-Year Writing with reading scores equivalent to 130 or higher on the NTID Reading Test and writing scores of 67 or higher on the NTID Writing Test. However, students who complete AAS degrees typically enter NTID with reading scores above 98 on the NTID Reading Test and writing scores above 50 on the NTID Writing Test.

Mathematics: Placement in Integrated Algebra (NMTH-212) or higher. Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least two years of high school science. Completion of high school chemistry is required.

Industries


  • Biotech and Life Sciences

  • Chemical

  • Consumer Packaged Goods

  • Environmental Services

  • Food and Beverage

  • Manufacturing

  • Oil and Gas

  • Pharmaceuticals

Typical Job Titles

Laboratory Technician, Quality Control Specialist, Assistant Research Development Scientist

Curriculum

Laboratory science technology, AAS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
NLST-120
Laboratory Tools
This course introduces students to the Laboratory Science Technology (LST) program's curriculum and the laboratory tools required for success in the program and as professionals in the laboratory science field. Topics will include an introduction to historical and current issues in the field, concepts of analytical testing, basic laboratory applications, fundamental technical skills used in the laboratory, laboratory safety, laboratory notebooks and information management, scientific reference and information sources, the identification and use of laboratory equipment, maintaining a laboratory environment, concepts of quality control, and the analytical process. Students begin to organize a Laboratory Science Technology portfolio.
3
NLST-171
Fundamentals of Chemistry I
This course is an introduction to the fundamental theories and principles of chemistry governing the structure and behavior of matter at the atomic and molecular levels. The language of chemistry including nomenclature and symbolic representation is presented. Computational strategies applied to stoichiometry, reaction analysis and solution preparation are practiced. Laboratory activities focus on precision and accuracy in the collection of data. Chemical hygiene and safety procedures in the laboratory are emphasized.
3
NSCI-161
LAS Perspective 6: Fundamentals of Biology I
This course provides students with fundamentals of cellular biology. Topics include chemical components of cells, cell structure and function, membrane transport, osmosis, cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Principles governing genetics, gene expression and reproduction are introduced. Laboratory methods used to make observations and collect data are practiced. Recording observations and analysis of data are emphasized in formal written laboratory reports.
3
NMTH-212
Integrated Algebra‡
An intermediate algebra course consisting of a blended lecture/lab component in which non-linear functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, exponents, polynomials, roots, radicals and properties of the complex numbers are considered. There is significant emphasis on scientific and geometric models, as well as the use of graphing utilities. Students cannot earn credit for both NMTH-210 and NMTH-212.
3
NLST-172
Fundamentals of Chemistry II
This course is an introduction to the concepts of kinetics and thermodynamics. Chemical equilibrium and rate constants will be presented and quantified. The ideal gas law will be explored. Mathematical models will be developed and computational strategies will be applied and practiced. Laboratory activities will supplement course themes. Chemical hygiene and safety procedures in the laboratory are emphasized.
3
NSCI-162
Fundamentals of Biology II
This course provides students with fundamentals of biological concepts and processes. Topics include plant and animal form and function, nutritional and excretory requirements, and homeostatic mechanisms and their regulation in organisms. Principles governing the concept of biological evolution and genomic evolution are introduced. Laboratory methods used to make observations and collect data are practiced. Recording observations and analysis of data are emphasized in formal written laboratory reports. Laboratory activities complement classroom activities.
3
NLST-220
Analytical Chemistry
This course introduces quantitative analysis utilizing both gravimetric and volumetric techniques. Topics include volumetric preparation and analytical procedures, acid/base and electron transfer titrations and related computational methods, and gravimetric procedures and analyses. Standard laboratory notebook protocol will be introduced and practiced. Chemical hygiene protocol and safety procedures in the laboratory are emphasized.
4
 
First Year Writing Seminar
3
 
First Year LAS Elective†
3
 
ASL-Deaf Cultural Studies†
 
 
LAS Perspective 1
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
NLST-250
Quantitative Instrumental Analysis
In this course students learn and apply concepts and principles of analytical testing using laboratory instruments, instrumentation theory, and procedures. Concepts surrounding spectroscopy, electroanalytical methods, advanced and automated methods of instrumental analysis are presented. Techniques including sample preparation, instrumentation set-up and maintenance, calibration, precision measurement, safety, and data collection/analysis are introduced. Selected instrumentation presented in this course include electroanalytical meters/probes, atomic and molecular spectrophotometers, and automated instrumentation.
4
NLST-240
Biotechnology I
This course prepares students to perform biotechnical applications in industry-specific fields of analysis. Standard methods, operating procedures, equipment/instrumentation, and protocols are introduced and reinforced. Topics include ethical issues in Biotechnology, DNA manipulation, protein analysis, tissue culture, and molecular diagnosis. Sampling, testing, and reporting in the field of biotechnology are covered.
3
NLST-230
Principles of Organic Chemistry
This course provides an introduction to the principles of organic chemistry. Topics include structure, nomenclature, and properties of carbon-containing molecules according to the various functional groups that are central to organic chemistry. Investigations involving chemical reactions, data collection, and qualitative and quantitative analyses provide a framework for laboratory activities. Chemical hygiene and safety procedures in the laboratory are emphasized.
4
NLST-225
Laboratory Applications
This course continues a focus on the application of laboratory tools, techniques, procedures, and scientific theory. Course topics include study of written technical procedures, technical writing, the reporting and presentation of scientific information, and topics related to the job search process and working as a professional in the field. Students synthesize information learned in previous and concurrent courses by participating in job related simulations. A Laboratory Science Technology portfolio will continue to be developed.
3
NLST-232
Laboratory Mathematics
This course addresses classic laboratory calculations and elementary descriptive statistics in the context of modern information technology and computing methods. Use of hand-held calculators and computer software to exchange, analyze and chart electronically-stored data is a central focus of this course. Study is closely coordinated with student experiences in Laboratory Science Technology courses. Topics include basic descriptive statistics with quality control applications, capture and analysis of real laboratory data, exponential and logarithmic modeling, and applications of scientific concepts.
3
NLST-255
Chemical Separations and Chromatography
In this course students learn and apply advanced concepts and principles in analytical testing using laboratory instruments/equipment, theory, and procedures as they relate to chemical separations and chromatographic methods of analysis. Techniques including sample preparation, instrumentation set-up and maintenance, calibration, precision measurement, safety, and data collection/analysis are studied. Selected techniques/instrumentation presented in this course include solid and liquid phase separations/extractions, liquid and gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis.
NLST-245
Biotechnology II
This course prepares students to perform Biotechnology applications in industry, specifically as they relate to microorganisms, proteomics, and genomics. Topics include bacterial expression systems for production, purification and characterization of recombinant proteins. Study will include concepts of DNA manipulation/analysis and enzymology. Standard methods, operating procedures, and protocols are introduced and reinforced. Sampling, testing, and reporting in the fields of Biotechnology, microbiology, and molecular biology are covered.
3
NLST-235
Principles of Biochemistry
This course provides an introduction to the principles of biochemistry through a study of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, enzymes, and nucleic acids. The metabolic pathways that involve these systems will also be explored. Principles of general and organic chemistry will be emphasized through an examination of the structures, concepts, and reactions that are central to biologically important molecules.
3
NLST-260 
Laboratory Methods
This course is a capstone to the program's focus on the application of laboratory tools, techniques, procedures, and scientific theory. Professional and ethical behavior standards in the science laboratory environment and current trends in performing analyses from advanced standard methods are central to this course. Students synthesize information learned in previous and concurrent technical courses by participating in job related simulations. This course also serves as a final mechanism for Co-op preparation. Students finalize a Laboratory Science Technology portfolio.
3
NLST-299
Cooperative Education
This cooperative work experience gives students matriculated in the Laboratory Science Technology program a practical sampling of working in the field of laboratory sciences. Students will work under the supervision of qualified professionals while performing a variety of tasks pertaining to the field.
Co-op
 
LAS Perspective 2
3
Third Year
 
Professional/Technical Electives§
6
 
LAS Perspective 3, 4
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
76

* See Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† An ASL-Deaf Cultural Studies (AASASLDCS) course is required for graduation. It can be taken in any semester and can be taken at NTID or another college of RIT. In order to fulfill this requirement as part of the credit hours in the program, it can be a course approved for both AASASLDCS and an LAS Perspective.

‡ Students placing above NMTH-212 must take a higher-level NMTH or MATH (College of Science) course as appropriate.

§ Please see list of professional /technical electives below. 

Professional/Technical electives*
BIOL-101
General Biology I
This course serves as an introduction to cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and the origin of life and evolutionary patterns of organism development on Earth.
BIOL-121
Introductory Biology I
This course serves as an introduction to molecular biology, cellular biology, genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and both the processes and patterns of the organismal development (ontogeny) and the evolution of life on Earth (phylogeny). Laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular, molecular, developmental, and evolutionary biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy and biotechnology, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations.
CHEM-130
Chemical Connections
This course introduces first-year chemistry and biochemistry majors to the topics of chemical safety, ethics, database searching, citation protocol, presentation development and execution as well as the career options in the field and opportunities at RIT and beyond. These topics will be covered in the context of developing a product that the student will accomplish during the lab component of the course.
CHEM-151
General Chemistry
An accelerated entry-level course designed for chemistry and biochemistry majors. Topics include measurement, atomic theory, chemical bonding and structure, stoichiometry, equilibrium and acid-base chemistry.
CHEM-155
Chemistry Workshop
This course presents an introduction to working in a modern chemistry laboratory. Students will perform exercises that will aid in the understanding of general laboratory practices, atomic and molecular structure, and Lewis acid base theory. Students will also become familiar with keeping a scientific laboratory notebook and writing scientific abstracts. Students will also utilize modern chemical instrumentation to aid in the understanding of concepts.
CHMG-141
General and Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
MATH-161
Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills.
MATH-171
Calculus A
This is the first course in a three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). This course includes a study of functions, continuity, and differentiability. The study of functions includes the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Limits of functions are used to study continuity and differentiability. The study of the derivative includes the definition, basic rules, and implicit differentiation. Applications of the derivative include optimization and related-rates problems.
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
MEDG-101
Human Biology I
This course is one of a two-course set of courses that explores the biology of the human body. This course focuses on: cells, their structure, and organization; the human reproductive cycle; principle of genetic inheritance; transmission of disease and the body’s defense against disease. Recommended to concurrently take: MEDG-103 Human Biology Laboratory I *Note: Taken alone, this course fulfills the Scientific Principles Perspective. When taken with MEDG-103 the two courses together fulfill the Natural Science Inquiry Perspective
MEDS-201
Language of Medicine
Language is a systematic means or method of communicating ideas, events, or feelings. It is a combination of words or symbols used to encode and decode information. Medicine has a language to communicate information regarding the human body, its functions, diseases, tests, and procedures. This course explores the language of medicine, the rules of “language,” language mechanics that apply how to create words, define terms, and identify abbreviations. In addition to learning the fundamentals, the student will gain experience in writing, using the language of medicine, as well as interpreting that language into everyday English.
MEDS-250
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems. Laboratory exercises include histological examination, actual and simulated anatomical dissections, and physiology experiments with human subjects.
NLST-270
Chemical Technology
This course prepares students to perform industry-specific applications of chemical analysis. Standard methods, operating procedures, and protocols are introduced and reinforced. Sampling, testing, and reporting in the fields of environmental, industrial, forensic, pharmaceutical, and food testing are covered. Instrumental, volumetric, and gravimetric techniques are practiced, as they relate to the fields of chemical technology.
NLST-285
Undergraduate Research: Laboratory Science Technology
This course is a faculty-directed student research project at the undergraduate level. The research will entail an in-depth study of concepts related to those covered in the Laboratory Science Technology program that could be considered of an original nature. Enrollment in this course requires permission from the Department Chair and completion of the NTID Undergraduate Research Contract.
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used.
STAT-155
Introduction to Biostatistics

* Some of these courses may require department approval. Additional courses may be used as electives, with department approval.