Biomedical Sciences Bachelor of science degree

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Overview

Develop an integrative understanding of the human body as the foundation for hands-on research experience, to pursue medical or dental school, or continue graduate study in a variety of health care fields or research positions in biomedical science.


The biomedical sciences major prepares students for advanced study in various areas of health care (e.g. medicine, dentistry, nursing, public health) or research. The diverse curriculum includes a broad array of elective courses and offers students career-relevant experiential learning opportunities where they can apply the knowledge they gain in the classroom to real-world experiences. Comprehensive academic and faculty advising is complemented by a pre-medical/pre-health professions advising system that provides guidance to students in their selection of course work and in completing the requirements necessary for admission to advanced degree programs.

The bachelor of science degree in biomedical sciences consists of a life sciences core combined with a broad range of flexible elective options. The life sciences core provides students with a strong grounding in mathematics and science with a complement of liberal arts in preparation for a particular career path (e.g., entry into medical/dental school, graduate studies, or direct entry into a research position in an applied area of biomedical science). The program offers excellent undergraduate preparation for career fields such as medicine (allopathic and osteopathic), biomedical research, exercise science, pathology, pharmacy, pharmacology and drug development, toxicology, neuroscience, and genetic counseling. Recent graduates have gone on for advanced degrees in physician assistant, chiropractic medicine, nurse practitioner and prosthetic science. In consultation with an academic advisor and using a basic course schedule as a guideline, students may select from elective courses relevant to one of these career fields, or design their own set of science track electives approved by one of the program’s academic advisors.

Students may also choose to use up to six elective credits to engage in undergraduate research or independent study with a faculty mentor. These opportunities are not limited to the biomedical sciences faculty and laboratories. Many of our students participate in highly interdisciplinary research with faculty from the College of Science, the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, and other centers and colleges at RIT. We strongly encourage students to explore the world beyond RIT–through study abroad, community service, experiential learning, and summer research internships. In addition, institute electives provide an excellent opportunity to pursue a secondary field of study through a minor in one of more than 100 areas of study. The program’s goal is to prepare students to develop the multidisciplinary skills, self-confidence, and cross-disciplinary literacy that allows them to thrive in the dynamic, rapidly changing world of biomedicine and biomedical sciences.

Experiential Learning

A broad and demanding curriculum is the foundation for the career areas supported by the biomedical sciences major. Yet, all of these areas also require some element of learning that occurs outside of the classroom. Hands-on, experiential learning allows students to explore new areas of study, solidify career goals, and acquire critical extracurricular credentials that increase the competitiveness of graduate and medical school applications and significantly enhance employment opportunities after graduation.

The program strongly encourages students to actively seek out new experiences and to expand their expertise to areas outside of the traditional classroom. These opportunities may include paid employment on campus, study abroad, volunteer work and community service, K-12 outreach and enrichment, professional career shadowing and career-relevant employment, on-campus undergraduate research, Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs), summer research internships, and other paid cooperative learning programs. Students receive collaborative advising from faculty and staff in order to systematically build towards their own career goals. In addition, the RIT/Rochester Regional Health alliance is dedicated to innovation in medical care, education, and research for the betterment of individuals in both respective institutions and the greater Rochester community. RIT is Rochester Regional Health’s official academic affiliate and Rochester Regional Health is the university’s official affiliated clinical partner. Learn more about the RRH alliance.

Program Goals and Learning Outcomes

The biomedical sciences major has outlined the following program goals and student learning outcomes:

Develop an integrative understanding of the human body in preparation for careers in health care and biomedical sciences, including research.

  • Students will master foundational knowledge of the systems and physiology of the human body.

Develop critical and analytical thinking skills.

  • Students will apply knowledge to complex issues in human health and/or development.

Develop a basic understanding of the physical sciences examining mechanisms and processes across a broad range of scale.

  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of key basic physics and chemistry concepts.

Expand awareness of a broad array of career options and activities in human medicine, biomedical research, and allied health professions.

  • Students will acquire knowledge of different medical care and delivery systems (US and other nations), and of the role of health-related and clinical research in addressing health issues.

Careers

Employment opportunities in the biomedical sciences continue to grow and develop—driven in part by advances in biotechnology and the need for more research and better treatments for current and emerging health care and public policy challenges, including diabetes, cancer, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. Courses are designed to provide the knowledge base and the technical skills necessary to address these challenges and are required in a broad spectrum of medical and health care related careers.

Industries


  • Health Care

  • Medical Devices

  • Pharmaceuticals

  • Biotech and Life Sciences

Latest News

Curriculum

Biomedical Sciences, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
BIOL-121
Introductory Biology I 
This course serves as an introduction to molecular biology, cellular biology, genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and both the processes and patterns of the organismal development (ontogeny) and the evolution of life on Earth (phylogeny). Laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular, molecular, developmental, and evolutionary biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy and biotechnology, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations.
4
BIOL-122
Introductory Biology II
This course serves as an introduction to the diversification of life, plant anatomy and physiology, animal anatomy and physiology, and ecology. Topics include a survey of the taxonomic diversity of the major groups of living organisms, the anatomical and physiological adaptations of both plants and animals, and the principles of the ecological relationships among organisms and environments. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts of taxonomy, anatomical & physiological adaptation, and ecological relationships. Labs are also designed to help the development of laboratory skills and techniques for experiments with live organisms, and improve the ability to make, record and interpret observations.
4
CHMG-141
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): General and Analytical Chemistry I 
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
3
CHMG-145
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry): General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions.
1
CHMG-142
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles): General and Analytical Chemistry II 
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics.
3
CHMG-146
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles):General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions.
1
MATH-161
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills.
4
MEDS-242
Cell Structure and Function
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
First Year Writing
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
BIOL-201
Cellular and Molecular Biology
This course will address the fundamental concepts of Cellular and Molecular Biology. Lectures, assignments, and laboratory projects will explore the structure and function of molecules, organelles, and cells and the biological processes they are involved in. Students in this course will gain an understanding of various molecular mechanisms, structure/function relationships, and cellular processes as they relate to cellular and molecular biology. Students in this course will practice and carry out common laboratory techniques used by Cellular and Molecular Biologists including, recombinant DNA technology, cell trafficking, and cloning techniques.
4
MEDS-250
 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems. Laboratory exercises include histological examination, actual and simulated anatomical dissections, and physiology experiments with human subjects.
4
MEDS-251
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immunological, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems with an emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis. Laboratory exercises include histological examinations, anatomical dissections and physiological experiments using human subjects.
4
STAT-145
 LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used.
3
 
Chemistry Sequence Courses
7
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
Third Year
 
Program Elective Requirements
12
 
Professional Electives 
9
 
Professional Elective (WI)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
Fourth Year
 
Program Elective Requirement
6
 
Professional Electives
6
 
Free Electives
12
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Electives

Biomedical sciences program electives

Each student must choose a minimum of two courses from each category (for a minimum total of 18 SCH) of Program Electives below. One course cannot be used more than once to this requirement. Additional courses from the list below of from the list of professional electives may be used to meet professional elective requirements.

Medical foundations
Course
MEDS-417
Clinical Microbiology
Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting.
MEDS-418
Clinical Microbiology Lab
Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course provides a hands-on experience in identifying these types of agents. The course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting.
MEDS-422
Endocrinology
This course will combine lecture, literature review, and small group discussions/presentations to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of human endocrinology. Topics covered will include: digestion and metabolism; growth and aging; arousal/mood; sexual dimorphism and reproduction; and neuroendocrinology. Discussion of relevant human diseases/disorders will be used to illustrate related biochemical/anatomical pathways and mechanisms.
MEDS-425
Introduction to Neuroscience
This course will focus on the human nervous system, and its regulation of behavior and complex function. Background information on neuroanatomy, cellular physiology, neurotransmission, and signaling mechanisms will pave the way for an in-depth analysis of specialization at the systems level. Our goal will be to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying normal human behaviors and pathogenic states.
MEDS-520
Histology and Histopathology
This foundational course in the study of human biology and medicine provides students with a detailed exploration of the microscopic and structural anatomy of normal human tissues and organs, with special emphasis given to the relationships between the cellular architecture of human organs and organ systems and their functions. The course also examines human pathologies as a manifestation of the loss of cellular integrity leading to alterations in the histological features of diseased organs.
MEDS-530
Human Immunology
Introduction to the fundamental facts and concepts on immunology to include: innate and adaptive immunity; cells, molecules, tissues and organs of the immune "system"; cell communication and interaction; antibody structure and function; and the application of these concepts to infectious diseases, vaccine design, autoimmune diseases, cancer, transplantation, regulation of the immune response, allergic reactions and immunosuppression. Students will gain an understanding of immunological principles and techniques, and their application to contemporary research, with results from instructor’s research laboratory
Medicine and disease
Course
MEDS-245
Medical Genetics
This course will serve as an introduction to the field of medical genetics. Throughout the course we will survey several human variations and diseases of medical importance. Clinical case reports will be incorporated to illustrate the underlying genetic principles.
MEDS-313
Introduction to Infectious Disease
This is an advanced course in the mechanisms by which bacteria and fungi cause disease in humans. The course topics include the clinical signs of each disease, diagnosis of each disease, pathogenic mechanisms used by the organisms to cause disease, treatment of the disease, and prevention of the disease. The laboratory component of this course will consist of a mixture of methodologies used in the identification of the infectious agents, evaluation of the host response to the infection, case studies, student presentations of articles related to infectious disease and other assignments aimed at deepening the understanding the infectious disease process.
MEDS-421
Parasitology
Introduction to parasites of medical importance and the diseases they cause. It includes study of a variety of parasites classified by diseases such as blood and intestinal protozoan parasites, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes. Examples of important parasitic diseases to be covered include malaria, sleeping sickness, elephantiasis, river blindness, leishmaniasis, amebic dysentery, and babesiosis. Coursework includes an examination of the distribution and transmission, pathogenesis, clinical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and control. Contribution of parasitic infections to economic and health inequities between developed and developing countries will be analyzed.
MEDS-430
Epidemiology and Public Health
The course covers applications of epidemiology to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, morbidity, injuries, disability, and mortality in populations. Epidemiologic methods for the control of conditions such as infectious and chronic diseases, community and environmental health hazards, and unintentional injuries are discussed. Other topics include quantitative aspects of epidemiology, including data sources; measures of morbidity and mortality; evaluation of association and causality; and various study design methods. Contemporary topics in public health (e.g. swine flu, HIV/AIDS, SARS), outbreak investigation, and containment strategies will be examined, analyzed, and thoroughly discussed.
MEDS-515
Med Pathphysiology
This course is designed as an introductory course in pathophysiology, the study of disease and its consequences. It covers the basic mechanisms of disease, concentrating on the diseases that are most frequently encountered in clinical practice. The major topics of discussion will emphasize the general pathologic processes; this will provide a basis for understanding diseases affecting specific organ systems. Clinical correlations will be made as examples of how physiological processes can go awry in the generation of a particular disease.
Medicine and health
Course
EXSC-352
Coaching Healthy Behavior
MEDS-402
Biomedical Ethics
This course will explore key ethical principles, guidelines and regulations that inform decision making and best practices in biomedical research, public health and clinical medicine including issues of informed consent, experimental design, acceptable risk, research integrity, medical errors, for-profit medicine, refusal of care, end-of-life decisions, physician assisted death, substance abuse and ethical use of animals in research. Students will also have multiple opportunities to further develop critical thinking and effective professional communication skills in a seminar format.
Choose one of the following:
  MEDS-360
   Placebo, Suggestion, Research and Health
This course provides a foundation for understanding the history and science of placebo effects with a focus on how these effects influence research design, therapeutics and health. A model of placebo effects – comprised of conditioning, expectation, social influence, and paradigm – is developed and applied to both health and common diseases in order to recognize that all health interventions are at least placebos. The question is whether they are anything more. The course structure and process include assigned readings, quizzes, creative class projects, studying advertisements, hearing from pharmaceutical company representatives, and class discussion designed to provoke critical thinking.
  MEDS-361
   Applied Psychophys and Self Regulation
Learn how to change your mind. This course explores the evolving field of psychophysiology and its applications for therapeutic self-regulation in health care as well as its implications for the related fields of psychology, biomedical engineering, computer science, and medical economics. By focusing on the mind as an emergent phenomenon of bidirectional brain and body interaction, we realize how much of our own physiology we can and do self-regulate. We will review research on hypnosis, biofeedback, meditative strategies, and psychophysiological monitoring. The course structure integrates lecture, demonstration, discussion and individual self-monitoring projects. Weekly quizzes provide feedback on learning.
Choose one of the following:
  MEDS-311
   Diagnosing the Criminal Mind
This course will introduce students within the biomedical sciences, physician assistant, psychology and criminal justice fields to understand basic clinical diagnostic terms, symptoms and behaviors that pertain to clients who commit crime. The course will introduce students to the relationship between mental health, drug addiction, crime and violence. Students will be involved in mock trials, debates and case write ups.
  MEDS-426
   Addiction Pharmacology 
This course will explore the general concepts, social consequences, policy, and other aspects of substance abuse and addiction. Multiple perspectives will be presented, including those of addicts, health-care providers, and family/friends affected by addiction. Then, commonly abused drugs will be discussed in detail. Topics to be presented and discussed for each drug class include: epidemiology, pathophysiology, drug class information, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics actions, short-term and long-term consequences of misuse (including overdose), and contemporary pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities. Availability of resources used to address substance abuse will also be presented. Lastly, the course will require visit(s) to one or more of the following meetings: alcoholics anonymous, narcotics anonymous, Al-Anon, and/or Nar-Anon.
Choose one of the following:
  NUTR-215
   Contemporary Nutrition 
This is an introductory course in contemporary nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Students learn to analyze their own diets and develop strategies to make any necessary dietary changes for a lifetime of good health. Current health and nutrition problems and nutrition misinformation will be discussed.
  NUTR300
   Sports Nutrition
This course will provide an introduction to the integration between exercise and nutrition-related topics by exploring the intimate link among nutrition, energy metabolism, and human exercise response. The course content will sort fact from fiction and help students and practitioners obtain the knowledge they need to give sound advice to athletes and active individuals.
Biomedical sciences professional electives
Course
BIOL-265
Evolutionary Biology
This course investigates the historical framework of evolutionary biology and the meaning/nature of evidence pertinent to biological evolution. Topics will include: earth history, the evolution of proteins and the genetic code, molecular evolution, neutral theory vs. selection, genetic variation, natural selection, migration, mutation, genetic drift, fitness, population dynamics and genetics, speciation, systematics and classification systems, molecular phylogenetics, the evolution of eukaryotic organisms, behavioral evolution, historical biogeography, and human evolution and variation.
BIOL-303
Cell Physiology
This course is a study of functional eukaryotic cellular physiology with an emphasis on the role of global gene expression in cellular function and disease. Nuclear and cytoplasmic regulation of macromolecular synthesis, regulation of cellular metabolism, control of cell growth, and the changes in cell physiology in disease are covered. This course also covers the technology used for studying changes in gene expression associated with cell differentiation and disease. The associated laboratory covers microarray techniques. This includes design and implementation of an experiment to acquire gene expression data, analyzing the acquired data using simple computer programs, such as MAGIC, and writing a research paper explaining findings.
BIOL-306
Food Microbiology
This course presents the microbiology of foods. Topics include microbial food spoilage, foodborne pathogens, food preservation techniques, and environmental parameters found in foods important in the survival of food spoilage microbes and foodborne pathogens. The lab will include exercises on isolating heterotrophs from all kinds of food, isolation of fungi from various foods, and the survival of various pathogens in food and beverages.
BIOL-308
Biology of Cancers
This course will address the fundamental concepts of the molecular and cellular biology of cancer cells. Class discussions, reading and writing assignments will explore the function of tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, growth factors, and signal transduction pathways in the context of cancer cell growth, organization, and communication. Students in this course will gain an understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of tumorigenesis, will become aware of landmark findings, current research, and practice how to communicate effectively through scientific writing. This is a designated writing intensive course.
BIOL-314
Tissue Culture
This course will present the techniques and applications of culturing eukaryotic cells, tissues, and organs in vitro. Emphasis will be placed on mammalian systems. Lectures will cover the historical background of tissue culture, how to authenticate cell lines, basic cell culture techniques; as well as stem cells, tissue engineering, and the role of cell culture in regenerative medicine. In the laboratory, students will be introduced to growth curves, cloning techniques, primary cell culture, and making a cell line; as well as detecting mycoplasma and other cell culture contaminants.
BIOL-321
Genetics
Introduction to the principles of inheritance; the study of genes and chromosomes at molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels.
BIOL-322
Developmental Biology
This course is a study of the processes of growth, differentiation and development that lead to the mature form of an organism. The course will also address how developmental biology is integrated with other aspects of biology including disease, ecology, and evolution.
BIOL-340
Genomics
This course introduces students to the analysis of complex genomes. Emphasis is placed on genetic information derived from the human genome project but advances with genomes of other model systems will be discussed. Lectures cover scientific techniques used to map and sequence the human genome, as well as strategies for identification of disease susceptibility genes. The laboratory utilizes an automated DNA sequencer to demonstrate the acquisition of genetic sequences. Laboratory sessions emphasize cycle sequencing of cloned DNA fragments using an automated fluorescent DNA sequencer.
BIOL-365
Introduction to Population Genetics
This course consists of a study of DNA, genes, inheritance, genetic variation, genetic architecture, and change within and among populations. Fundamental genetics topics include DNA, gene, and chromosomal structure and function along with, transmission genetics, Mendelian inheritance patterns, sex-linked inheritance, genetic linkage, and the Hardy-Weinberg Principle. Population based topics will include genetic variation, its importance, how it originates and is maintained as well as inbreeding, random mating, mutation, migration, selection, genetic drift, the effects of small population size, fitness, population subdivision, the shifting balance theory, inter-deme selection, kin selection, neutral theory, molecular evolution, molecular clocks, multi-gene families, gene conversion, artificial selection, the genetic basis of quantitative traits and the fundamental theorem of natural selection.
BIOL-375
Advanced Immunology 
This course is an in-depth treatment of the molecular and cellular events associated with innate and adaptive immune responses. The response of the host to the environment of microbes and pathogens will be emphasized. Recognition and response of the host to the infectious agents and the resolution of the disease state will be examined at the cellular and molecular levels. The immune response to tumors will be treated and medical advances in treating neoplastic disease using immunological therapy will be presented. The laboratories will focus on the cellular and molecular techniques employed in the modern immunology laboratory. A laboratory module employing hybridoma techniques will provide an intensive experience with monoclonal antibodies and their use in diagnostics and disease treatment.
BIOL-412
Human Genetics
The course provides an overview of concepts and applications in human genetics. Topics include classical and complex mechanisms of inheritance, the human genome, human origins & evolution, forensic applications, personalized medicine, and ethical issues.
BIOL-415
Virology
This course is an introduction to virology with specific emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of virus infection of eukaryotic cells and virus-cell interactions. Virus structure, genetics, the infectious cycle, replication strategies, pathogenesis, persistence, effects on host macromolecular synthesis, viral oncogenesis, viral vectors, emerging viral diseases, and strategies to protect against and combat viral infection will be discussed.
BIOL-420
Bacterial-Host Interactions: Microbiomes of the World
This course focuses on the bacterial and host (human, insect, plant, animals and fungi) mechanisms used in interactions with hosts during both pathogenesis and symbiosis. We will explore molecular, microbiome and genomic levels, drawing on the disciplines of genomics, biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology. Several of the agonistic and antagonistic interactions will illustrate broader principles and contribute to our fundamental understanding of biological processes. The results of these interactions have a strong impact on biological productivity, and so are also ever increasing important in human health. An emphasis will be on the roles of molecules and cell structures in determining the outcome of an interaction. Course is intended to allow students to develop knowledge of host-bacterial interactions at the molecular to organismal level, with an emphasis on several model symbiotic- and patho-systems. Knowledge about bacterial mechanisms use to associate with host organisms and the different strategies bacteria employ to gain entry, damage host tissue and obtain nutrients for growth will be explored. We will also illustrate several mutualistic relationships between eukaryotic hosts with partner symbiotic bacteria. Genomic approaches to describe microbiomes (microbial communities) on host organisms and in environments will also be explored.
BIOL-427
Microbial and Viral Genetics
This course will examine bacterial and viral genetic systems. These systems will be studied with the idea that they are simple examples of the genetics systems found in higher organisms, and can also be used as biotechnological tools. This course will show how these prokaryotic systems have served as excellent model systems for studying the genetics of higher organisms. This course will examine how these systems can be genetically manipulated using transformation, transduction, transposition, and conjugation. Bacteria and viruses will be discussed as important tools for many of the greatest discoveries in biology; especially in molecular biology and genetics. In addition some of the primary research journal articles will be critiqued.
BIOL-428
Eukaryotic Gene Regulation and Disease
This course presents an overview of gene expression in eukaryotic systems, with an emphasis on how disease can result when gene regulation is disrupted. Points of control that are examined include: chromatin structure, transcription initiation, transcript processing, stability and modification, RNA transport, translation initiation, post-translational events, and protein stability. The mechanisms involved in regulating these control points are discussed by exploring specific well studied cases. The significance of these processes is highlighted by a discussion of several diseases that have been shown to be due to defects in gene regulation.
BIOL-450
Genetic Engineering
This course is a laboratory-intensive introduction to the theoretical basis, laboratory techniques, and applications of gene manipulation.
BIOL-601
Genetic Diseases and Disorders
The identification of genetic causes of disease has been one of the major modern scientific breakthroughs. This course examines a range of inherited diseases, how causative genetic variations were or are being identified, and what this means for the treatment of the diseases. Scientific literature will be utilized, both current and historical.
CHMA-261
Instrumental Analysis
This course presents a preliminary treatment of instrumental theory and technique. The course will cover the theory and implementation of spectroscopic, mass spectrometric, and chemical separations instrumentation and techniques. Instrumental techniques include: atomic and molecular emission and absorption and emission spectroscopies, atomic and molecular mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography.
CHMB-240
Biochemistry for Health Sciences
This course will focus on the application of biochemical knowledge to the field of medicine. Students will learn the basic functions of water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in humans, then explore implications of this knowledge in nutrition and metabolism and its relationship to health and disease.
CHMB-402
Biochemistry I
This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed.
CHMB-405
Biochemistry Lab
An introduction to the theory and practice of modern experimental biochemical laboratory techniques and concepts. The weekly two-hour lecture provides a theoretical framework for the course and includes a discussion of the properties of biomolecules and how those properties are exploited in the separation and characterization of the molecules. Practical laboratory techniques include the preparation of buffers, centrifugation, chromatography, electrophoretic methods, and UV-visible spectrophotometry as applied to the isolation and characterization of proteins and nucleic acids. The manipulation of genetic material in E. coli will also be executed. This course will be offered in a writing intensive format where the students will write and submit the different sections found in scientific papers (abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion, conclusions, references, figures, tables) in an iterative fashion that will include regular feedback from the instructor.
CHMO-231
Organic Chemistry l
This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions.
CHMO-232
Organic Chemistry II 
This course is a continuation of the study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: aromatic systems, alcohols, ethers, epoxides, and carbonyls. This course will introduce the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions.
CHMO-235
Organic Chemistry l Lab
This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231.
CHMO-236
Organic Chemistry II Lab
This course teaches students to apply basic lab techniques to organic synthetic experiments reactions covered in the accompanying lecture COS-CHMO-232. This course will also help students to solidify the concepts taught in lecture. The course will continue to instruct students in maintaining a professional lab notebook.
EXSC-205
Sports Physiology and Life Fitness
This course goes inside the science of physical fitness providing the student with an in depth physiological understanding of how the body adapts and improves through exercise activity. Students actively perform a series of self-assessments which they must analyze in order to determine their current state of fitness. With this data students develop exercise programs tailored to their needs and interests. Stress management and nutrition are examined allowing students to incorporate these two important areas into their plans to be fit for life.
EXSC-206
Fitness Prescription
This course is designed to provide instruction to prepare students for certification as a Personal Trainer. It examines the role exercise plays in both the enhancement of health and fitness as well as the improvement of athletic performance. Students will develop a basic understanding of how the human body functions while physically active. Case studies are utilized to assist in the development of practical skills.
EXSC-207
Exercise for Special Populations 
This course is designed for those who are interested in the science of exercise and fitness for individuals with diagnosed disease states, or high performance requirements. The theoretical and diagnostic value of exercise testing will be reviewed. This information will then be used to create exercise prescriptions and understand the therapeutic benefit that exercise will have on specific conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and obesity. High performance individuals functioning in challenging environments such as, astronauts, high altitude climbers, and ultramarathoners will also be considered.
EXSC-280
Strength Training for Performance
Stronger athletes make better athletes no matter what the sport and this course teaches techniques of optimal training to enhance the muscular fitness of all manner of athletes. Physiological principles of strength development and basic musculoskeletal anatomy are reviewed and general program design is discussed. Utilizing case studies, students develop sport specific programs which will be presented to the class. Students will also produce strength training manuals outlining appropriate guidelines for improved performance.
EXSC-320
Coaching Healthy Behavior
This course will teach students to encourage those with long standing lifestyle habits that contribute to their chronic illness to change is a very challenging proposition. It addresses this problem by incorporating psychological, sociological and counseling principles, along with coaching skills, into an intervention technique that emphasizes the positive and leads people to choose and adhere to a wellness lifestyle. Students will review case studies and meet with professionals in the field.
EXSC-410
Kinesiology
As a study of human movement this course will cover topics that begin with a review of the functional anatomy of the musculo-skeletal system including both the upper and lower extremity as well as the spinal column and thorax. Factors of linear and rotary motion are reviewed along with postural analysis and movement elements associated with pushing, pulling and throwing objects. There is no separate Lab for this class and laboratory experiences will be incorporated into specifically designated lecture times. At the conclusion of this course students will have a functional capability to assess the intricacies of human movement.
EXSC-430
Theory of Athletic Injury 
Even the very best athletes experience injury and being able to recognize and respond to those conditions is a crucial skill for those who will work with athletes. Students will learn the signs and symptoms of injury and the process of first response as well as how to support athletes through rehab. Successful students will learn how to incorporate injury reduction techniques into the training programs they develop for the athletes they serve.
EXSC-480
Training High Performance Athletes
Aerobic capacity, strength, flexibility, speed, power, agility, nutrition, and rest are all crucial to the success of athletes and for trainers the need to appropriately coordinate all these factors is a significant challenge. This course explores the interrelationship of the multifactoral principles of athletic performance. Using case studies, modeling, flow sheets and scheduling plans students develop techniques that will lead athletes to success in their training routines.
EXSC-550
Exercise Physiology
Exercise Physiology is the scientific basis for the field of exercise science. This course provides students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the body’s responses and adaptations to exercise. Neuromuscular physiology is reviewed along with energy systems and mechanisms of fatigue. The cardiorespiratory system is examined with a focus on control and regulation during activity and there is a look at the physiological components of exercise training. Environmental factors that impact sport activities as well as training techniques which optimize performance will be reviewed. The differences in performance and adaptation that exist between children, adolescents, and adults as well as between males and females will be compared and contrasted. Exercises influence on long term health and fitness will conclude the course. Laboratory experiences will allow students to integrate and apply the concepts of exercise physiology through investigative experiments.
MEDS-201
Language of Medicine 
Language is a systematic means or method of communicating ideas, events, or feelings. It is a combination of words or symbols used to encode and decode information. Medicine has a language to communicate information regarding the human body, its functions, diseases, tests, and procedures. This course explores the language of medicine, the rules of “language,” language mechanics that apply how to create words, define terms, and identify abbreviations. In addition to learning the fundamentals, the student will gain experience in writing, using the language of medicine, as well as interpreting that language into everyday English.
MEDS-240
History of Medicine 
This course explores various discoveries in the history of medicine and the individuals credited with the discoveries. The course begins in ancient Greece and ends with modern times. Individuals such as Hippocrates, Vesalius, Harvey, Jenner, Leeuwenhoek and Roentgen will be discussed.
MEDS-245
Medical Genetics
This course will serve as an introduction to the field of medical genetics. Throughout the course we will survey several human variations and diseases of medical importance. Clinical case reports will be incorporated to illustrate the underlying genetic principles.
MEDS-290
Biomedical Research
This course provides an opportunity for in-depth experiential learning through collaborative work on an independent research project.
MEDS-300
Premedical Studies
This course prepares students to navigate the admissions process and interviews for medical, osteopathic, optometry, podiatric and dental school. The preparation will also address issues related to the field of medicine, including alternatives, ethics, and financial concerns.
MEDS-310
Introduction to Pharmacology
This course provides an overview of the pharmacy profession (educational requirements, professional responsibilities and opportunities, role of the pharmacist in the health care team) and a detailed look into basic pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetic, and pharmaceutical principles. The pharmacodynamics principles covered include mechanisms of drug action, drug-receptor interaction theory, dose-response relationships, structure-activity relationships, and principles of drug metabolism. Pharmaceutical topics include formulations, drug product design, excipients, dosage forms, and elimination rate. Lastly, specific disease states will be covered that will clearly, and effectively demonstrate many of the topics taught. The diseases will be approached by presenting the etiology followed by the pharmacotherapy, including the details of the multiple drug classes that are used for any one-disease state.
MEDS-311
Diagnosing the Criminal Mind
This course will introduce students within the biomedical sciences, physician assistant, psychology and criminal justice fields to understand basic clinical diagnostic terms, symptoms and behaviors that pertain to clients who commit crime. The course will introduce students to the relationship between mental health, drug addiction, crime and violence. Students will be involved in mock trials, debates and case write ups.
MEDS-313
Introduction to Infectious Diseases
This is an advanced course in the mechanisms by which bacteria and fungi cause disease in humans. The course topics include the clinical signs of each disease, diagnosis of each disease, pathogenic mechanisms used by the organisms to cause disease, treatment of the disease, and prevention of the disease. The laboratory component of this course will consist of a mixture of methodologies used in the identification of the infectious agents, evaluation of the host response to the infection, case studies, student presentations of articles related to infectious disease and other assignments aimed at deepening the understanding the infectious disease process.
MEDS-333
Patient Care
This course will introduce key elements of integrated, high-quality patient care. Through lecture, role-play and hands-on practice, essential aspects of team-based patient care will be explored. Vital skills and behaviors such as professionalism, communication, documentation, workplace safety, patient assessment, patient positioning and transfers, and acute medical situations will be presented. Infection control, medications and their administration, and medical-legal issues will also be examined.
MEDS-345
Care-Based Genetic Counseling
This course will provide students with an inside look at the profession of genetic counseling and its patients through in-depth case studies of actual patient scenarios, role playing and lectures focused on realistic challenges faced by genetic counselors. This course will focus on combining scientific information about genetic disorders with the psychosocial aspects of counseling sessions that will give provide an accurate perspective of the profession. Students will participate in role playing exercises, keep detailed journals and participate in mock patient interviews.
MEDS-355
Introduction to Global Health
This introductory course will evaluate the modern challenges of global health from a multidisciplinary perspective. The key concepts of global health will be discussed, including various health determinants, human rights, healthcare systems, culture’s impact on health, environmental concerns, nutrition, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, women’s health issues, child and adolescent health, injuries, natural disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, poverty’s impact on health and more. Students will be expected to be active learners, lead classroom activities on certain days as part of group research project presentations, and actively participate in discussions.
MEDS-360
Placebo, Suggestion, Research and Health
This course provides a foundation for understanding the history and science of placebo effects with a focus on how these effects influence research design, therapeutics and health. A model of placebo effects – comprised of conditioning, expectation, social influence, and paradigm – is developed and applied to both health and common diseases in order to recognize that all health interventions are at least placebos. The question is whether they are anything more. The course structure and process include assigned readings, quizzes, creative class projects, studying advertisements, hearing from pharmaceutical company representatives, and class discussion designed to provoke critical thinking.
MEDS-361
Applied Psychophysiology and Self-Regulation
Learn how to change your mind. This course explores the evolving field of psychophysiology and its applications for therapeutic self-regulation in health care as well as its implications for the related fields of psychology, biomedical engineering, computer science, and medical economics. By focusing on the mind as an emergent phenomenon of bidirectional brain and body interaction, we realize how much of our own physiology we can and do self-regulate. We will review research on hypnosis, biofeedback, meditative strategies, and psychophysiological monitoring. The course structure integrates lecture, demonstration, discussion and individual self-monitoring projects. Weekly quizzes provide feedback on learning.
MEDS-370
Community Healthcare
This seminar course is a unique opportunity for students who are serious about pursuing a career in healthcare. The course will focus on the study of key issues concerning community health care and developing practical approaches to supporting patients. Students consider obstacles to effective health care as well as strategies for enabling at-risk patients to play a more active role in promoting their health and well-being. Topics covered include: challenges of delivering adequate healthcare in the community; population health; the concept of “underinsurance”; the business of healthcare; health literacy and measuring outcomes. Students in the course will be expected to undertake at least one subsequent internship (MEDS 475 Health Coach Practicum) with Rochester Regional Health and the Greater Rochester Independent Practice Association (GRIPA). Students complete an application before registering for this course. Acceptance into the course is contingent upon passing a screening and interview process.
MEDS-402
Biomedical Ethics
This course will explore key ethical principles, guidelines and regulations that inform decision making and best practices in biomedical research, public health and clinical medicine including issues of informed consent, experimental design, acceptable risk, research integrity, medical errors, for-profit medicine, refusal of care, end-of-life decisions, physician assisted death, substance abuse and ethical use of animals in research. Students will also have multiple opportunities to further develop critical thinking and effective professional communication skills in a seminar format.
MEDS-403
US Healthcare
The course will explore the beginnings of the healthcare delivery in America, and the economics of the healthcare enterprise. It will also explore the role of government in providing and regulating the delivery of healthcare services as well as ethical issues that affect the doctor-patient relationship. Finally, the course will examine the healthcare systems of other industrialized nations and compare and contrast those systems with that of the U.S.
MEDS-411
Researching the Criminal Mind
This course will introduce students to clinical research as it pertains to symptoms, behaviors, the prediction of violent behaviors and treatment outcomes among offenders who commit crime. The course will introduce students to evidenced based science and the application to forensic populations, manuscript preparation, clinical case write ups and small grant proposals.
MEDS-415
Pathophysiology of Organ Systems I
This course is designed to provide the students with the necessary foundation of the physiologic and pathologic processes that underlie the spectrum of human disease entities and is taught in the context of clinical scenarios that demonstrate the basic science principles in a real-world context of health care. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles of cell injury and repair, infection, neoplasia, and inflammation as well as hemodynamic disorders, thromboembolic disease and shock. Additional emphasis is placed on organ systems and their disorders such as the circulatory, liver, gallbladder and biliary systems. Material is presented in the context of case studies, utilizing clinical findings and addressing underlying basic physiologic, biochemical and immunologic processes as they relate to patient care and individual patient problem cases.
MEDS-416
Pathophysiology of Organ Systems II
This course is second in a sequence designed to provide the students with the necessary foundation of knowledge and under-standing of the physiologic and pathologic processes that underlie the spectrum of human disease entities and is taught in the context of clinical scenarios that demonstrate the basic science principles in a real-world context of health care. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of the central nervous system, lower urinary tract, male and female reproductive organs, gastrointestinal tract, spleen, pancreas, kidneys and endocrine system. Material is presented in the context of case studies, utilizing clinical findings and addressing underlying basic physiologic, biochemical and immunologic processes as they relate to patient care and individual patient problem cases.
MEDS-417
Clinical Mircobiology 
Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting.
MEDS-418
Clinical Mircobiology Lab
Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course provides a hands-on experience in identifying these types of agents. The course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting.
MEDS-421
Parasitology
Introduction to parasites of medical importance and the diseases they cause. It includes study of a variety of parasites classified by diseases such as blood and intestinal protozoan parasites, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes. Examples of important parasitic diseases to be covered include malaria, sleeping sickness, elephantiasis, river blindness, leishmaniasis, amebic dysentery, and babesiosis. Coursework includes an examination of the distribution and transmission, pathogenesis, clinical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and control. Contribution of parasitic infections to economic and health inequities between developed and developing countries will be analyzed.
MEDS-422
Endocrinology
This course will combine lecture, literature review, and small group discussions/presentations to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of human endocrinology. Topics covered will include: digestion and metabolism; growth and aging; arousal/mood; sexual dimorphism and reproduction; and neuroendocrinology. Discussion of relevant human diseases/disorders will be used to illustrate related biochemical/anatomical pathways and mechanisms.
MEDS-425
Introduction to Neuroscience
This course will focus on the human nervous system, and its regulation of behavior and complex function. Background information on neuroanatomy, cellular physiology, neurotransmission, and signaling mechanisms will pave the way for an in-depth analysis of specialization at the systems level. Our goal will be to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying normal human behaviors and pathogenic states.
MEDS-426
Addiction Pharmacology
This course will explore the general concepts, social consequences, policy, and other aspects of substance abuse and addiction. Multiple perspectives will be presented, including those of addicts, health-care providers, and family/friends affected by addiction. Then, commonly abused drugs will be discussed in detail. Topics to be presented and discussed for each drug class include: epidemiology, pathophysiology, drug class information, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics actions, short-term and long-term consequences of misuse (including overdose), and contemporary pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities. Availability of resources used to address substance abuse will also be presented. Lastly, the course will require visit(s) to one or more of the following meetings: alcoholics anonymous, narcotics anonymous, Al-Anon, and/or Nar-Anon.
MEDS-430
Epidemiology and Public Health
The course covers applications of epidemiology to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, morbidity, injuries, disability, and mortality in populations. Epidemiologic methods for the control of conditions such as infectious and chronic diseases, community and environmental health hazards, and unintentional injuries are discussed. Other topics include quantitative aspects of epidemiology, including data sources; measures of morbidity and mortality; evaluation of association and causality; and various study design methods. Contemporary topics in public health (e.g. swine flu, HIV/AIDS, SARS), outbreak investigation, and containment strategies will be examined, analyzed, and thoroughly discussed.
MEDS-440H
Cardiac Imaging
MEDS-470
Examining the Clinical Experience
This course builds off of the clinical experiences of students currently working or volunteering in a clinical setting. The course will include informal and formal writing assignments. Topics addressed include the following: the roles of the various healthcare professionals; understanding sensitivity and diversity; logistics of the health care system – in-patient and out-patient; privacy and safety issues associated with patients and care providers; documentation methods. (Currently volunteering or working in a healthcare setting)
MEDS-475
Health Coach Practicum
This course is a continuation of MEDS 370 and provides an opportunity for students to apply key concepts in health coaching to assist members of the community. Students will cover such topics as self-management, motivational interviewing, cultural competency and goal setting. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with health care professionals in identifying barriers to healthcare as well as creating ways to improve patient outcomes. Journaling and progress notes are writing formats that will be covered and provide the student with a way to express their experiences in both a reflective and a professional manner.
MEDS-490
Human Gross Anatomy
This course exposes students to details of human anatomy through cadaver dissection. Lecture material stresses functional and clinical correlates corresponding to laboratory exercises.
MEDS-499
Biomedical Sciences Co-op
One semester of paid work experience in a healthcare related field.
MEDS-501
Human Development
This course will provide a survey of the primary biological events, mechanisms and underpinnings of human development from conception through aging. It will use case studies, human clinical and laboratory research papers to enrich and illustrate key points related to human developmental milestones. A significant emphasis will be placed on understanding developmental disabilities and adult-onset degenerative disorders, and also in relating biological events to an individual’s larger psychosocial functioning. Students will also improve professional communication skills through discussions, writing and revision.
MEDS-510
Biomedical Research
This course provides an opportunity for in-depth experiential learning through collaborative work on an independent research project.
MEDS-511
Interdisciplinary Research
This course will provide an independent, interdisciplinary research opportunity to enhance the experiential learning component of the Biomedical Sciences Program. Students will engage in preparatory reading and original research in an academic discipline or environment outside of their immediate major. Proposed work may span a broad variety of disciplines within a unifying theme of project goals and potential outcomes with strong application to human health and development. Examples may include mechanical, electrical or biomedical engineering: imaging science and optics; entrepreneurship and biotechnology; epidemiology, community health, and public policy.
MEDS-515
Medical Pathophysiology
This course is designed as an introductory course in pathophysiology, the study of disease and its consequences. It covers the basic mechanisms of disease, concentrating on the diseases that are most frequently encountered in clinical practice. The major topics of discussion will emphasize the general pathologic processes; this will provide a basis for understanding diseases affecting specific organ systems. Clinical correlations will be made as examples of how physiological processes can go awry in the generation of a particular disease.
MEDS-518
Oral Microbiology
MEDS-520
Histology and Histopathology
This foundational course in the study of human biology and medicine provides students with a detailed exploration of the microscopic and structural anatomy of normal human tissues and organs, with special emphasis given to the relationships between the cellular architecture of human organs and organ systems and their functions. The course also examines human pathologies as a manifestation of the loss of cellular integrity leading to alterations in the histological features of diseased organs.
MEDS-530
Human Immunology
Introduction to the fundamental facts and concepts on immunology to include: innate and adaptive immunity; cells, molecules, tissues and organs of the immune "system"; cell communication and interaction; antibody structure and function; and the application of these concepts to infectious diseases, vaccine design, autoimmune diseases, cancer, transplantation, regulation of the immune response, allergic reactions and immunosuppression. Students will gain an understanding of immunological principles and techniques, and their application to contemporary research, with results from instructor’s research laboratory
MEDS-599
Biomedical Independent Study
This course will provide students the opportunity for independent study in a topic of strong interest.
NUTR-215
Contemporary Nutrition
This is an introductory course in contemporary nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Students learn to analyze their own diets and develop strategies to make any necessary dietary changes for a lifetime of good health. Current health and nutrition problems and nutrition misinformation will be discussed.
NUTR-300
Sports Nutrition
This course will provide an introduction to the integration between exercise and nutrition-related topics by exploring the intimate link among nutrition, energy metabolism, and human exercise response. The course content will sort fact from fiction and help students and practitioners obtain the knowledge they need to give sound advice to athletes and active individuals.
PHYS-111
College Physics l
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings.
PHYS112
College Physics ll
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, fluids, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, opyics, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 3 years of math is required. Pre-calculus is recommended
  • Biology and Chemistry required

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in liberal arts, sciences, and math

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in biology or liberal arts with biology option

Learn about admissions and financial aid