Studio Arts bachelor of fine arts degree

e40c9b44-9ae8-43c8-9356-a622008bff78 | 128599

Overview

Acquire the conceptual and technical skills to succeed as a creative professional in ceramics, expanded forms, furniture design, glass, metals and jewelry design, printmaking, painting, or sculpture.


The studio arts major offers options in ceramics, expanded forms, furniture design, glass, metals and jewelry design, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. The close alignment of curricular content and scheduling among these eight options fosters a sense of community through shared experiences and facilitated interaction. Through this integration, students acquire the conceptual and technical skills required to succeed as creative professionals.

The curriculum engages students in comprehensive inquiry that expands and supports their subject matter, ideation through sketches and models, articulation of a rationale for the application of media and process, and finally the refinement of work through editing and critique. Students are also exposed to a wide scope of visual arts and study their cultural relevance through visiting artists, trips to museums, and attendance at professional conferences. During the senior year, students exhibit their final body of work in a gallery. Guidance and experiential projects focusing on presentation of work, self-promotion, business practice, and issues of professional engagement within the field help students thrive as creative professionals after graduation.

Upon completion of the program, students may choose to continue their education at the graduate level or begin careers by setting up independent studios and exhibiting their work. They also find employment in the fields of art therapy, art criticism, art restoration, gallery and museum management, set and display design, and marketing and advertising; in auction houses for their knowledge of contemporary and historical art and material culture; or as educators. Faculty members are active artists who exhibit widely and are committed to diverse approaches to art-making. They serve as inspiring role-models for studio arts majors and offer them support and networking opportunities as they emerge as professionals.

Options

Students choose an option in one of the following areas:

Ceramics–The ceramics option provides a dynamic environment where intellectual discourse and craftsmanship thrives. Students focus on intellectual development, technical skill, and practical knowledge. The curriculum supports a range of fundamental topics within ceramics, such as sculpture, pottery, mold-making, glazing, firing, and material science and personal aesthetic development with individual critiques and group discussions. Students selecting this option are equipped with the professional and practical skills necessary to operate a studio business.

Expanded forms–Artists have always challenged the definition of art. These challenges have pushed art into new realms of expression and the public into new ways of seeing. The expanded forms option, like the wider art world, extends beyond the traditional forms of painting, printmaking, and sculpture. Artists have expanded the possibilities for expression. Object making goes hand-in-hand with performance, installation, computer art, and multi-media displays. Students are encouraged to explore the full spectrum of experimental and non-traditional artistic expression.

Furniture design–The furniture design option engages students in the pursuit of their creative interests while providing a comprehensive technical background in contemporary woodworking. The option focuses on technical expertise, freeing students to investigate a full range of creative expression and professional interests. A carefully sequenced curriculum begins with a firm foundation in the use and maintenance of hand tools, proceeding on to more advanced tools and topics in construction and design.

Glass–Through a rigorous and diversified curriculum, the glass option cultivates artists who are as versatile in their making as they are in their thinking. Studio instruction in glassblowing, flame-working, hot and kiln casting, cold-working, kiln-forming, glass imaging processes, and three-dimensional digital technologies help inform each student’s creative potential with glass. An emphasis on research, idea development, material exploration, execution, and presentation equip students with the skills needed to succeed as professionals.

Metals and jewelry design–The metals and jewelry design option focuses on design, aesthetics, as well as material and process mastery. Self-discovery is at the heart of student assignments, projects, and group discussions. This option develops student’s creative potential through a broad introduction to materials and production techniques before moving on to advanced techniques in various metals.

Painting–Students selecting this option engage in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. The comprehensive curriculum covers traditional methodologies as well as contemporary visual art practices. Rigorous studio practice and critical discourse encourage the development of a strong personal language that allow for effective individual expression.

Printmaking–Non-toxic printmaking focuses on concepts and techniques. Organized to offer a flexible experience, this option targets the development of problem solving and skill building within the context of printmaking. The curriculum addresses a wide variety of media, tools, and both traditional and technological techniques, as well as theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation processes.

Sculpture–The sculpture option engages students in the exploration of three-dimensional art-making. Traditional sculptural processes are introduced, such as bronze casting, stone carving, steel fabrication, and mold-making, within a curriculum that focuses on both formal and conceptual development. Working with a broad variety of materials, ideas, and practices, students are prepared to engage in the dialogue of contemporary sculpture. Over the course of the major, students develop the technical, visual, and intellectual skills required to develop a sophisticated body of work.

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  • Advertising, PR, and Marketing

  • Museum

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Curriculum

Studio Arts (ceramics option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
STAR-250
Studio Exploration Core: STAR Collaborative Topics
The course will involve two disciplines collaborating to develop creative works focused on a particular theme or conceptual framework. STAR Collaborative Topics will students an exploratory and collaborative studio experience that will encourage and increase preparation for cross-disciplinary work in later years. Students will use concept, design and creative inquiry to gain familiarity with the breadth and scope of each medium involved, as well as the potential for mixed-media solutions. This course will also provide students with the initial skills needed in order to take more advanced courses within media-specific STAR-BFA options (ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry Design). Exact description of each topic offered will be determined by a faculty team and may have limited repeatability.
6
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design I
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design II
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CCER-201
Concept, Material and Process Core: Ceramics Sophomore I
This course will introduce students to wheel throwing techniques as used in functional ware. Emphasis will be placed on designing, preparation, and **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CCER-202
Concept, Material and Process Core: Ceramics Sophomore II
This course will introduce students to hand building and mold making techniques as a foundation to create sculptural ceramic vessels. Emphasis will be placed on designing, preparation, and execution of compositional elements in three-dimensional forms. Students will be encouraged to explore different methods and techniques to compete. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
STAR-202
Studio Elements: Crafts CADD Drawing
This is the second of a two-semester class covering basic CADD (computer assisted design and drawing) for both design and presentation. Topics covered will include a broad range of drawing types, three-dimensional modeling and presentation strategies. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, homework, drawing and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
 
Studio Elements: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
CCER-301
Specialization Requirement: Ceramics Junior I
In this course students will be introduced to industrial forming methods of ceramics. Students will develop drawings/proposals and a strategy for production. The students will then produce molds for slip casting as a means to produce multiples of a consistent quality. Students will develop their own slip castings clay bodies, slips and glazes for cone 6-oxidations/reduction firings. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CCER-302
Specialization Requirement: Ceramics Junior II
The purpose of this course will investigate the properties of the sculptural ceramic vessel to develop the student's personal aesthetic and visual thinking. Assigned projects will evoke the student's imagination and ceramic vocabulary through the relationship between concept, design, form, surface embellishment, and choice of firing methods and glazes. A systematic investigation of ceramic clays, raw materials, glaze materials, glaze composition, and glaze calculation will be presented in lecture and assignments. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
Studio Elements Requirement: Professional Elective§
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
CCER-501
Specialization Requirement: Ceramics Senior I
The first semester of the senior year is a continuation of the work begun in the junior year. The student’s proposal is to be defined and the work refined with discussion through faculty and group critique. The criteria relating to the evolving concept will be developed with studio involvement. Discussions relating to career choices, graduate and post graduate opportunities, job hunting, portfolio, resume writing, operating a studio, merchandising and business practices will coincide with studio work. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CCER-502
Specialization Requirement: Ceramics Senior II
This is the second of a two-semester course in which seniors will produce a project and must be able to offer evidence of qualification as a candidate for the baccalaureate degree to be approved by the faculty. The proposed body of work should develop self-expression and a personal direction in clay. The work should express the goals and ideas as well as the materials and processes that are stated in the proposal. Emphasis is on expression and technical foundation needed to establish the role of the body of work. The goal is to produce a coherent body of work of high standard which must be exhibited at a venue at the end of the school year. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
STAR-501
Professional Practices Requirement: Crafts Promotional Materials (WI)
This is the first of a two-semester class covering topics commonly associated with the operation of a small business in fields related to the fine and applied arts. This one semester course addresses promotional issues including portfolio, photography, resume writing, business cards and stationery, marketing, client relations, etc. Students will create their own comprehensive promotional package. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, studio and business visits, homework, papers, reports, and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
STAR-502
STAR Capstone
This course provides students with a capstone experience focused on the execution and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will also learn how to prepare professional presentations about their work through oral, written, and visual within the context of the contemporary art world. Group discussions, source presentations, material experiments, and presentation aspects will all be addressed.
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

§ Students choose one of the following professional electives: New Venture Development (BUSI-221), CADD Applications in Studio Arts (STAR-555), or Professional Development for Artists (PHFA-401).

Studio Arts (expanded forms option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
FDTN-222
Studio Exploration Core: 2D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 2D compositions within a more open and experimental approach while still covering the core foundational 2D design II concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester, but unique topics may only be taken once. Material and conceptual focus will be determined by the faculty proposing each unique topic.
3
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design I
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design II
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
Studio Exploration Core: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
First Year Writing  (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
FNAS-201
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Expanded Forms
As one of five required sophomore courses that introduce the techniques, processes, and technologies of the visual fine arts to fine arts studio students, Introduction to Expanded Forms focuses on the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art including: installation, performance, video, light, sound, and numerous digital media. Students will research and produce artwork utilizing some of these new forms of personal expression. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-202
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Non-toxic Printmaking
This course is a comprehensive introduction to non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course will focus on the expansion of problem solving and skill building within the context of printmaking. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum include the exploration of historical and cultural concepts of materiality and the multiple intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-203
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Painting
Students begin a personal exploration of techniques in painting to advance their understanding, using color theory, building compositions and effective use of painting materials. Individual approaches to content range from abstraction through representational art, as students address contemporary visual arts issues. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-204
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Sculpture
This course is designed for students to develop ideas through investigation of basic sculpture practices, processes, and materials. Introduction to additive, subtractive, assemblage, and substitution processes of making sculpture will be covered with expectations that students will develop these skills in relation to individual concepts and directions. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
FNAS-305
Studio Elements: Figure Drawing
Figure drawing skills are taught in a traditional life drawing class format with emphasis on dynamic line quality, visual perception and contemporary approaches to figure drawing.
3
 
Studio Elements: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
FNAS-501
Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
FNAS-514
Specialization Requirement: Ideation and Series
Creative flow, having an endless stream of ideas, alternatives, and choices for solutions, helps creative work evolve and reach more advanced levels. In this course students develop appropriate skills and strategies to generate ideas and develop them effectively.
3
FNAS-405
Studio Elements Requirement: Fine Art Drawing
This class is devoted to building upon each student’s skills in drawing with attention to use of a variety of mark making materials and surfaces. Drawing uses perceptual and conceptual approaches to creative visual art making. Students engage in issues of representation and abstraction through relationships of marks, lines and other graphic notations. Contemporary drawing can focus on direct observations or imaginative compositions among many other valid approaches.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
FNAS-401
Senior Capstone
This course gives fine arts studio students a capstone experience focused on the production and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will participate in an articulated process of making. This will involve the engagement in comprehensive research that expands and supports the work, the articulation of a rational for the use of media and process, the creation of sketches and models, and the refinement of work through periods of critiquing and editing. All of this will culminate in the professional presentation of oral, written, and visual work that contextualizes their position within contemporary artistic practice. Students will also be involved in every aspect of their senior show from creating the work, installing the exhibition, and preparing marketing materials.
3
FNAS-517
Professional Practices Requirement: Business Practices for the Fine Artists (WI)
This class is devoted to business issues that artists must address including building and maintaining a portfolio, pricing and marketing strategies and public relations. Financial organization and communication skills are highlighted as are networking skills for the advancement of an artist's work.
3
Choose two of the following:
6
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Art Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

Studio Arts (furniture design option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
STAR-250
Studio Exploration Core: STAR Collaborative Topics
The course will involve two disciplines collaborating to develop creative works focused on a particular theme or conceptual framework. STAR Collaborative Topics will students an exploratory and collaborative studio experience that will encourage and increase preparation for cross-disciplinary work in later years. Students will use concept, design and creative inquiry to gain familiarity with the breadth and scope of each medium involved, as well as the potential for mixed-media solutions. This course will also provide students with the initial skills needed in order to take more advanced courses within media-specific STAR-BFA options (ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry Design). Exact description of each topic offered will be determined by a faculty team and may have limited repeatability.
6
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design I
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design II
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CWFD-201
Concept, Material and Process Core: Furniture Design Sophomore I
This is the first of a two-semester sequential class covering the fundamental techniques and aesthetics of woodworking. Topics covered include the care and use of hand tools, the care and maintenance of woodworking power tools, wood as a material, its basic properties, basic joinery and fundamental techniques of wood fabrication, and finishing. The course includes a machine maintenance program. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CWFD-202
Concept, Material and Process Core: Furniture Design Sophomore II
This is the second of a two-semester sequential class covering the fundamental techniques and aesthetics of woodworking. Topics covered include the care and use of hand tools, the care and maintenance of woodworking power tools, wood as a material, its basic properties, basic joinery and fundamental techniques of wood fabrication, and finishing. The course includes a machine maintenance program. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
STAR-202
Studio Elements: Crafts CADD Drawing
This is the second of a two-semester class covering basic CADD (computer assisted design and drawing) for both design and presentation. Topics covered will include a broad range of drawing types, three-dimensional modeling and presentation strategies. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, homework, drawing and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
 
Studio Elements: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
CWFD-301
Specialization Requirement: Furniture Design Junior I
This is the first of a two-semester sequential class covering intermediate techniques and aesthetics of woodworking. Topics covered include the design process, advanced hand and power tool joinery, intermediate machine processes, chair design and construction and CAD/CAM/CNC introduction. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CWFD-302
Specialization Requirement: Furniture Design Junior II
This is the second of a two-semester sequential class covering intermediate techniques and aesthetics of woodworking. Topics covered include the design process, advanced hand and power tool joinery, intermediate machine processes, veneering, drawer, door and solid wood carcase design and construction and CAD/CAM/CNC technology. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
Studio Elements Requirement: Professional Elective§
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
CWFD-501
Specialization Requirement: Furniture Design Senior I
This is the first of a two-semester sequential class covering advanced techniques and aesthetics of woodworking. Topics covered include the design process, advanced woodworking processes, conceptually driven design and construction, development of a capstone project proposal and CAD/CAM/CNC.**Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CWFD-502
Specialization Requirement: Furniture Design Senior II
This is the second of a two-semester sequential class covering advanced techniques and aesthetics of woodworking. Topics covered include the design process, advanced woodworking processes, professional presentations, conceptually driven design and construction, and the creation of a capstone body of work. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
STAR-501
Professional Practices Requirement: Crafts Promotional Materials (WI)
This is the first of a two-semester class covering topics commonly associated with the operation of a small business in fields related to the fine and applied arts. This one semester course addresses promotional issues including portfolio, photography, resume writing, business cards and stationery, marketing, client relations, etc. Students will create their own comprehensive promotional package. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, studio and business visits, homework, papers, reports, and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
STAR-502
STAR Capstone
This course provides students with a capstone experience focused on the execution and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will also learn how to prepare professional presentations about their work through oral, written, and visual within the context of the contemporary art world. Group discussions, source presentations, material experiments, and presentation aspects will all be addressed.
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

§ Students choose one of the following professional electives: New Venture Development (BUSI-221), CADD Applications in Studio Arts (STAR-555), or Professional Development for Artists (PHFA-401).

Studio Arts (glass option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
STAR-250
Studio Exploration Core: STAR Collaborative Topics
The course will involve two disciplines collaborating to develop creative works focused on a particular theme or conceptual framework. STAR Collaborative Topics will students an exploratory and collaborative studio experience that will encourage and increase preparation for cross-disciplinary work in later years. Students will use concept, design and creative inquiry to gain familiarity with the breadth and scope of each medium involved, as well as the potential for mixed-media solutions. This course will also provide students with the initial skills needed in order to take more advanced courses within media-specific STAR-BFA options (ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry Design). Exact description of each topic offered will be determined by a faculty team and may have limited repeatability.
6
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
6
ACSC-010
Year One: College Experience
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D Design
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
First Year Writing Seminar (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CGLS-206
Concept, Material and Process Core: Molten Glass Practice I
This course will introduce students to basic glass working processes in the hot glass studio. Solid and blown techniques will be covered as ways to activate ideas through molten glass. In addition, basic processes of finishing and further manipulating annealed glass in the cold shop will also be introduced. Students will build technical understanding and material comprehension in the application of these skills within personally developed projects motivated by themes related to optics, time, and mimesis. **Fee: There is a lab fee for materials required (estimated cost of $225)**
3
CGLS-211
Concept, Material and Process Core: Mold and Kiln Glass Practice
This course will introduce students to basic mold making and glass working processes in the kiln studio. Fusing, slumping, and casting techniques will be covered as ways to activate ideas through kiln formed glass. In addition, basic processes of finishing and further manipulating annealed glass in the cold shop will also be introduced. Students will build technical understanding and material comprehension in the application of these skills within personally developed projects motivated by prompted themes found within contemporary art.
3
CGLS-207
Concept, Material and Process Core: Molten Glass Practice II
3
CGLS-212
Concept, Material and Process Core: Kinetic Glass Practice
3
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
STAR-202
Studio Element: Crafts CADD Drawing
This is the second of a two-semester class covering basic CADD (computer assisted design and drawing) for both design and presentation. Topics covered will include a broad range of drawing types, three-dimensional modeling and presentation strategies. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, homework, drawing and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
Studio Element: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
CGLS-301
Specialization Requirement: Glass Junior I
This is the first of a two-semester sequential class covering intermediate glass working techniques and processes. The course will build upon previous glass working knowledge and introduce assignments that investigate new alternatives to complex, traditionally-based processes in the hot, cold, flame, and kiln shops. Projects are designed to build a stronger technical palette. Additionally, projects will encourage students to research and integrate issues of personal interest and source material to inspire innovative pursuits and/or incorporations of conventional techniques and processes. Emphasis will be on the process of ideation, experimentation, and exploration. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CGLS-302
Specialization Requirement: Glass Junior II
This is the second of a two-semester sequential class covering intermediate glass working techniques and processes. Course emphasis is to further build upon previous glass working knowledge within the hot, cold, flame, and kiln shop to solve aesthetic and conceptual problems posed through regularly assigned topical projects. Students will apply new technical skills to self-generated projects and build a body of work that reflects the student's specific interests within a sculptural context. The student's focus will be on developing a personally relevant voice as an artist whilst expanding upon the student's technical arsenal of capabilities. Emphasis will be on a continued pursuit to innovatively approach traditional processes of glass working with the utmost of craftsmanship. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
 
Studio Element: Professional Elective§
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
STAR-502
STAR Capstone
This course provides students with a capstone experience focused on the execution and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will also learn how to prepare professional presentations about their work through oral, written, and visual within the context of the contemporary art world. Group discussions, source presentations, material experiments, and presentation aspects will all be addressed.
3
CGLS-501
Specialization Requirement: Glass Senior I
This is the first of a two-semester sequential class to aid the student in beginning the development of their thesis body of work. The student will articulate both a written and verbal proposal for a cohesive body of work. Advanced techniques will be demonstrated with an emphasis on acquiring skill and refinement of craftsmanship. Strong emphasis is placed on studio practice, material sensibility, excellent craftsmanship and idea development. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CGLS-502
Specialization Requirement: Glass Senior II
This is the second of a two-semester sequential class to aid the student in finalizing the development of their thesis body of work. The student will be guided by their written and verbal proposal for a cohesive body of work. Advanced techniques will be demonstrated with an emphasis on acquiring skill and refinement of craftsmanship within the context of their thesis exhibition. This course will prepare the student for professional exhibition opportunities and to work well on self-directed goals as well as collaborate on shared goals through the group senior exhibition. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
STAR-501
Professional Practices: Crafts Promotional Materials (WI)
This is the first of a two-semester class covering topics commonly associated with the operation of a small business in fields related to the fine and applied arts. This one semester course addresses promotional issues including portfolio, photography, resume writing, business cards and stationery, marketing, client relations, etc. Students will create their own comprehensive promotional package. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, studio and business visits, homework, papers, reports, and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

§ Students choose one of the following Professional Electives: New Venture Development (BUSI-221), CADD Applications in Studio Arts (STAR-555), or Professional Development for Artists (PHFA-401).

Studio Arts (metals and jewelry design option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
STAR-250
Studio Exploration Core: STAR Collaborative Topics
The course will involve two disciplines collaborating to develop creative works focused on a particular theme or conceptual framework. STAR Collaborative Topics will students an exploratory and collaborative studio experience that will encourage and increase preparation for cross-disciplinary work in later years. Students will use concept, design and creative inquiry to gain familiarity with the breadth and scope of each medium involved, as well as the potential for mixed-media solutions. This course will also provide students with the initial skills needed in order to take more advanced courses within media-specific STAR-BFA options (ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry Design). Exact description of each topic offered will be determined by a faculty team and may have limited repeatability.
6
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D DDesign II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
First Year Writing Seminar (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CMTJ-201
Concept, Material and Process Core: Metals and Jewelry Design Sophomore I
This course will introduce the student to basic jewelry hand tools. Ferrous and nonferrous metals, their compositions and working priorities, will serve as the primary materials. This course will provide an in depth instruction on basic design and fabrication techniques. Students will obtain instruction on the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop, learn basic machine and hand skills and basic tools. Students will be required to conduct research on a historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CMTJ-202
Concept, Material and Process Core: Metals and Jewelry Design Sophomore II
This course will introduce the student to silver soldering and gem setting. Additionally, students will be introduced to basic forming skills for hollowware, flatware and jewelry. Ferrous and nonferrous metals, their compositions and working priorities, will serve as the primary materials. This course will provide an in depth instruction on design and fabrication techniques, the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop, as well as machine and hand skills. Students will be required to conduct research on a historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation.**Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
STAR-202
Studio Elements: Crafts CADD Drawing
This is the second of a two-semester class covering basic CADD (computer assisted design and drawing) for both design and presentation. Topics covered will include a broad range of drawing types, three-dimensional modeling and presentation strategies. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, homework, drawing and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
 
Studio Elements: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
CMTJ-301
Specialization Requirement: Metals and Jewelry Design Junior I
This course will introduce the student to advanced jewelry techniques. Students will be introduced to advanced properties of various metals as a material and advanced casting and mold-making techniques. Students will study and learn the proper mathematical calculations for casting and mold making. Learning how to calculate the proper proportional gravity weights for alloys in casting will be taught. This course introduces jewelry and hollowware rendering, chasing and repousse, and tool making, as well as provide in depth instruction on advanced design and fabrication techniques. Students will obtain instruction on the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop. Students will be taught advanced machine skills, hand skills and tools. Students will be required to conduct research on a historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CCER-302
Specialization Requirement: Metals and Jewelry Design Junior II
The purpose of this course will investigate the properties of the sculptural ceramic vessel to develop the student's personal aesthetic and visual thinking. Assigned projects will evoke the student's imagination and ceramic vocabulary through the relationship between concept, design, form, surface embellishment, and choice of firing methods and glazes. A systematic investigation of ceramic clays, raw materials, glaze materials, glaze composition, and glaze calculation will be presented in lecture and assignments. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
Studio Elements Requirement: Professional Elective§
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
CMTJ-501
Specialization Requirement: Metals and Jewelry Design Senior I
This course concentrates on hollowware design and production through the introduction of spinning, advanced hollowware techniques and rendering. The design and compilation of a professional resume is also completed. This course introduces advanced gem setting and identification and gemstone anatomy. Students will obtain instruction on the proper use and maintenance of the metals shop. Students will be taught advanced machine skills, hand skills and tools. Students will be required to conduct research on a historical metals topic, write a paper and give a presentation. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
CMTJ-502
Specialization Requirement: Metals and Jewelry Design Senior II
This course continues instruction in advanced gem setting and identification and gemstone anatomy and introduces jewelry mechanisms. This course provides the student with individual research in technique and design. The senior level students are required to assemble a group show of their four year's work, complete a job search and a professional portfolio including resume, photography, and renderings.**Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
STAR-501
Professional Practices Requirement: Crafts Promotional Materials (WI)
This is the first of a two-semester class covering topics commonly associated with the operation of a small business in fields related to the fine and applied arts. This one semester course addresses promotional issues including portfolio, photography, resume writing, business cards and stationery, marketing, client relations, etc. Students will create their own comprehensive promotional package. The course includes lectures, group discussions, independent study, studio and business visits, homework, papers, reports, and oral presentations. Each semester long course is structured as an independent unit.
3
STAR-502
STAR Capstone
This course provides students with a capstone experience focused on the execution and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will also learn how to prepare professional presentations about their work through oral, written, and visual within the context of the contemporary art world. Group discussions, source presentations, material experiments, and presentation aspects will all be addressed.
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

§ Students choose one of the following Professional Electives: New Venture Development (BUSI-221), CADD Applications in Studio Arts (STAR-555), or Professional Development for Artists (PHFA-401).

Studio Arts (non-toxic printmaking option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
FDTN-222
Studio Exploration Core: 2D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 2D compositions within a more open and experimental approach while still covering the core foundational 2D design II concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester, but unique topics may only be taken once. Material and conceptual focus will be determined by the faculty proposing each unique topic.
3
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design I
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design II
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
Studio Exploration Core: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
FNAS-201
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Expanded Forms
As one of five required sophomore courses that introduce the techniques, processes, and technologies of the visual fine arts to fine arts studio students, Introduction to Expanded Forms focuses on the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art including: installation, performance, video, light, sound, and numerous digital media. Students will research and produce artwork utilizing some of these new forms of personal expression. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-202
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Non-toxic Printmaking
This course is a comprehensive introduction to non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course will focus on the expansion of problem solving and skill building within the context of printmaking. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum include the exploration of historical and cultural concepts of materiality and the multiple intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-203
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Painting
Students begin a personal exploration of techniques in painting to advance their understanding, using color theory, building compositions and effective use of painting materials. Individual approaches to content range from abstraction through representational art, as students address contemporary visual arts issues. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-204
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Sculpture
This course is designed for students to develop ideas through investigation of basic sculpture practices, processes, and materials. Introduction to additive, subtractive, assemblage, and substitution processes of making sculpture will be covered with expectations that students will develop these skills in relation to individual concepts and directions. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
FNAS-305
Studio Elements: Figure Drawing
Figure drawing skills are taught in a traditional life drawing class format with emphasis on dynamic line quality, visual perception and contemporary approaches to figure drawing.
3
 
Studio Elements: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
FNAS-502
Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
FNAS-514
Specialization Requirement: Ideation and Series
Creative flow, having an endless stream of ideas, alternatives, and choices for solutions, helps creative work evolve and reach more advanced levels. In this course students develop appropriate skills and strategies to generate ideas and develop them effectively.
3
FNAS-405
Studio Elements Requirement: Fine Art Drawing
This class is devoted to building upon each student’s skills in drawing with attention to use of a variety of mark making materials and surfaces. Drawing uses perceptual and conceptual approaches to creative visual art making. Students engage in issues of representation and abstraction through relationships of marks, lines and other graphic notations. Contemporary drawing can focus on direct observations or imaginative compositions among many other valid approaches.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
FNAS-401
Senior Capstone
This course gives fine arts studio students a capstone experience focused on the production and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will participate in an articulated process of making. This will involve the engagement in comprehensive research that expands and supports the work, the articulation of a rational for the use of media and process, the creation of sketches and models, and the refinement of work through periods of critiquing and editing. All of this will culminate in the professional presentation of oral, written, and visual work that contextualizes their position within contemporary artistic practice. Students will also be involved in every aspect of their senior show from creating the work, installing the exhibition, and preparing marketing materials.
3
FNAS-517
Professional Practices Requirement: Business Practices for the Fine Artists (WI)
This class is devoted to business issues that artists must address including building and maintaining a portfolio, pricing and marketing strategies and public relations. Financial organization and communication skills are highlighted as are networking skills for the advancement of an artist's work.
3
Choose two of the following:
6
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

Studio Arts (painting option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
FDTN-222
Studio Exploration Core: 2D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 2D compositions within a more open and experimental approach while still covering the core foundational 2D design II concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester, but unique topics may only be taken once. Material and conceptual focus will be determined by the faculty proposing each unique topic.
3
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design I
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design II
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
Studio Exploration Core: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
First Year Writing  (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
FNAS-201
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Expanded Forms
As one of five required sophomore courses that introduce the techniques, processes, and technologies of the visual fine arts to fine arts studio students, Introduction to Expanded Forms focuses on the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art including: installation, performance, video, light, sound, and numerous digital media. Students will research and produce artwork utilizing some of these new forms of personal expression. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-202
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Non-toxic Printmaking
This course is a comprehensive introduction to non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course will focus on the expansion of problem solving and skill building within the context of printmaking. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum include the exploration of historical and cultural concepts of materiality and the multiple intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-203
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Painting
Students begin a personal exploration of techniques in painting to advance their understanding, using color theory, building compositions and effective use of painting materials. Individual approaches to content range from abstraction through representational art, as students address contemporary visual arts issues. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-204
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Sculpture
This course is designed for students to develop ideas through investigation of basic sculpture practices, processes, and materials. Introduction to additive, subtractive, assemblage, and substitution processes of making sculpture will be covered with expectations that students will develop these skills in relation to individual concepts and directions. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
FNAS-305
Studio Elements: Figure Drawing
Figure drawing skills are taught in a traditional life drawing class format with emphasis on dynamic line quality, visual perception and contemporary approaches to figure drawing.
3
 
Studio Elements: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
FNAS-503
Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
FNAS-514
Specialization Requirement: Ideation and Series
Creative flow, having an endless stream of ideas, alternatives, and choices for solutions, helps creative work evolve and reach more advanced levels. In this course students develop appropriate skills and strategies to generate ideas and develop them effectively.
3
FNAS-405
Studio Elements Requirement: Fine Art Drawing
This class is devoted to building upon each student’s skills in drawing with attention to use of a variety of mark making materials and surfaces. Drawing uses perceptual and conceptual approaches to creative visual art making. Students engage in issues of representation and abstraction through relationships of marks, lines and other graphic notations. Contemporary drawing can focus on direct observations or imaginative compositions among many other valid approaches.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
FNAS-401
Senior Capstone
This course gives fine arts studio students a capstone experience focused on the production and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will participate in an articulated process of making. This will involve the engagement in comprehensive research that expands and supports the work, the articulation of a rational for the use of media and process, the creation of sketches and models, and the refinement of work through periods of critiquing and editing. All of this will culminate in the professional presentation of oral, written, and visual work that contextualizes their position within contemporary artistic practice. Students will also be involved in every aspect of their senior show from creating the work, installing the exhibition, and preparing marketing materials.
3
FNAS-517
Professional Practices Requirement: Business Practices for the Fine Artists (WI)
This class is devoted to business issues that artists must address including building and maintaining a portfolio, pricing and marketing strategies and public relations. Financial organization and communication skills are highlighted as are networking skills for the advancement of an artist's work.
3
Choose two of the following:
6
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

Studio Arts (sculpture option), BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
FDTN-222
Studio Exploration Core: 2D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 2D compositions within a more open and experimental approach while still covering the core foundational 2D design II concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester, but unique topics may only be taken once. Material and conceptual focus will be determined by the faculty proposing each unique topic.
3
ARTH-135
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
ARTH-136
LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
3
FDTN-111
Drawing I
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
3
FDTN-121
2D Design I
This course is a structured, cumulative introduction to the basic elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course focuses on the development of both a visual and a verbal vocabulary as a means of exploring, developing and understanding two-dimensional compositions. Concepts are introduced through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, assigned projects and critiques. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Visual comprehension, the ability to organize perceptions and horizontal thinking that crosses other disciplines and theories, are key foundational components to the development of problem solving skills. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum included the exploration of historical and cultural themes and concepts intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience.
3
FDTN-131
3D Design I
This course presents a progressive study over two-semesters in terminology, visual principles, exploration, concept generation, process, and techniques of three-dimensional design. Using hands-on problem solving, student will develop an informed understanding of the 3D form and space with an emphasis on the elements and principles of visual design and their function as the building blocks and guidelines for ordering a 3D composition. A heightened awareness of form and space will be developed through lecture, assigned projects, and critiques. Students will also develop a personal awareness of problem seeking and solving, experimentation, and critical analysis. **Note: May be taken as a one-semester offering**
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-112
   Drawing II
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  FDTN-212
   Drawing II Workshop
This course is an investigation of the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about a particular experience in drawing while still covering required foundation elements. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research and assigned projects.. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-132
   3D Design II
This is the second-semester of a sequential course. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Students will build on their prior term experiences, which include the introduction to 3D principles, materials, and building processes. Students will develop the sophisticated skill of conceptualization. More advanced problems will be assigned and students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of material and process possibilities for their resolution. A heightened awareness of idea development and design research will be explored. Inclusion of 21st century themes in the arts of social cultural and community.
 
  FDTN-232
   3D Design II Workshop
This workshop provides students with the opportunity to learn more about 3D compositions within a more open and experimental realm while still covering the core Foundation concepts. Different topics may be taken in the same semester. Topics may only be taken once. The focus is on composing three-dimensional form and its relationship to space. Material exposure will be determined by the topic’s instructor.
 
 
Studio Exploration Core: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
FNAS-201
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Expanded Forms
As one of five required sophomore courses that introduce the techniques, processes, and technologies of the visual fine arts to fine arts studio students, Introduction to Expanded Forms focuses on the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art including: installation, performance, video, light, sound, and numerous digital media. Students will research and produce artwork utilizing some of these new forms of personal expression. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-202
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Non-toxic Printmaking
This course is a comprehensive introduction to non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. Organized to create a broad introductory experience, the course will focus on the expansion of problem solving and skill building within the context of printmaking. The course addresses a wide variety of media, tools, techniques both traditional and technological, and theoretical concepts to facilitate skill development and experimentation with process. Accumulative aspects of the curriculum include the exploration of historical and cultural concepts of materiality and the multiple intertwined with aspects of personal interpretation and experience. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-203
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Painting
Students begin a personal exploration of techniques in painting to advance their understanding, using color theory, building compositions and effective use of painting materials. Individual approaches to content range from abstraction through representational art, as students address contemporary visual arts issues. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FNAS-204
Concept, Material and Process Core: Introduction to Sculpture
This course is designed for students to develop ideas through investigation of basic sculpture practices, processes, and materials. Introduction to additive, subtractive, assemblage, and substitution processes of making sculpture will be covered with expectations that students will develop these skills in relation to individual concepts and directions. ** Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
3
FDTN-141
4D Design
4D Design introduces students to the basic concepts of art and design in time and space. Computers, video, photo, sound, and lighting equipment are used to create short-form time-based work. Students learn video, audio, camera, lighting, composite animation, and other skills relevant to all students in majors and programs required to take this course. The course explores elements of moving images, such as serial, narrative ordering, still and moving image editing, transitions and syntax, sound and image relations, and principles of movement. The course addresses the both historical conventions of time in art and recent technological advances, which are redefining the fields of fine art and design. In focusing on the relations between students' spacing and timing skills, 4D Design extends and supplements the other foundation courses, and prepares students for further work with time-based media.
3
FNAS-305
Studio Elements: Figure Drawing
Figure drawing skills are taught in a traditional life drawing class format with emphasis on dynamic line quality, visual perception and contemporary approaches to figure drawing.
3
 
Studio Elements: CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
 
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
 
Third Year
FNAS-504
Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
6
FNAS-514
Specialization Requirement: Ideation and Series
Creative flow, having an endless stream of ideas, alternatives, and choices for solutions, helps creative work evolve and reach more advanced levels. In this course students develop appropriate skills and strategies to generate ideas and develop them effectively.
3
FNAS-405
Studio Elements Requirement: Fine Art Drawing
This class is devoted to building upon each student’s skills in drawing with attention to use of a variety of mark making materials and surfaces. Drawing uses perceptual and conceptual approaches to creative visual art making. Students engage in issues of representation and abstraction through relationships of marks, lines and other graphic notations. Contemporary drawing can focus on direct observations or imaginative compositions among many other valid approaches.
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Art History Elective‡
3
 
LAS Immersion 1 (WI)
3
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
FNAS-401
Senior Capstone
This course gives fine arts studio students a capstone experience focused on the production and exhibition of a culminating body of artwork. Students will participate in an articulated process of making. This will involve the engagement in comprehensive research that expands and supports the work, the articulation of a rational for the use of media and process, the creation of sketches and models, and the refinement of work through periods of critiquing and editing. All of this will culminate in the professional presentation of oral, written, and visual work that contextualizes their position within contemporary artistic practice. Students will also be involved in every aspect of their senior show from creating the work, installing the exhibition, and preparing marketing materials.
3
FNAS-517
Professional Practices Requirement: Business Practices for the Fine Artists (WI)
This class is devoted to business issues that artists must address including building and maintaining a portfolio, pricing and marketing strategies and public relations. Financial organization and communication skills are highlighted as are networking skills for the advancement of an artist's work.
3
Choose two of the following:
6
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FNAS-501
   Specialization Requirement: Expanded Forms
Fine Arts Studio Expanded Forms examines the diverse new forms of expression that have emerged in contemporary fine art, including installation, performance, video and digital art among the many other possibilities. Students will research some of these new forms and produce artwork in at least one of these forms. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-502
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Non-Toxic Printmaking
Fine Arts Studio: Non-Toxic Printmaking is designed to introduce advanced non-toxic printmaking concepts and techniques. The focus will be on non-toxic intaglio printmaking research and how to creatively apply techniques that will result in sophisticated works of art. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture, or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-503
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts Studio Painting
Fine Arts Studio Painting engages students in contemporary visual art practice through a personal exploration of painting techniques. Individual approaches to painting address issues of representation and abstraction to build a portfolio for further career advancement. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
  FNAS-504
   Specialization Requirement: Fine Arts  Studio Sculpture
Fine Arts Studio: Sculpture allows students to explore concepts, materials, processes, and techniques to develop a personal, cohesive three-dimensional body of work. Theories and history of sculpture will be discussed as relevant to individual directions. Students in the fine arts studio program may choose any combination of fine arts studio classes: painting, non-toxic printmaking, sculpture or expanded forms to meet the 18 credit course requirements in their major. Course may be repeated. **Fee: There is a lab fee required for this course**
 
 
CAD Studio Elective†
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
120

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

† CAD Studio Electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

‡ Art History Electives are non-studio courses offered in the College of Art and Design or the College of Liberal Arts.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • Studio art experience and a portfolio of original artwork are required for all programs in the schools of Art and Design. A portfolio must be submitted. View Portfolio Requirements for more information.

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in studio art, art history, and liberal arts. A portfolio of original artwork is required to determine admissions, studio art credit, and year level in the program. View Portfolio Requirements for more information.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

Related programs or studio art experience in desired disciplines. A portfolio of original artwork is required to determine admissions, studio art credit, and year level in the program. View Portfolio Requirements for more information. Summer courses can lead to third-year status in most programs.

Learn about admissions and financial aid