Business Administration Master of business administration (MBA) degree

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RIT's MBA degree provides you with a strong focus on not only technology, but information systems, data analytics, and an exceptional foundation in the STEM fields.


100%

Outcome Rate of RIT Graduates

$63.5K

Average First-Year Salary of RIT Graduates


Overview

Applications of technology and data analytics are the future of modern business. And, as organizations adapt, there is an increasing demand for business leaders to acquire skills in information systems and data analytics. RIT's MBA degree is designed to provide you with a strong focus on not only technology, but information systems, data analytics, and an exceptional foundation in the STEM fields.

Information Systems–You'll learn to design and implement leading-edge enterprise technologies in order to collect, store, analyze, and manage vast amounts of data gathered through various customer touch points.

Data Analytics–As businesses and organizations collect more and more data, there is a need to analyze and interpret this information and use it to make intelligent business decisions. RIT's MBA program includes courses in data analytics, data management, and business intelligence to help you acquire the skills you need to harness information that generates managerial insights.

STEM–Paired with our traditional focus on technology, RIT's entire MBA degree has now become a STEM-designated program. This means you'll graduate with a solid background in the STEM fields that are impacting business today. You'll compete STEM-designated elective courses, chosen by you, in areas that include computing, supply chain analysis, managing innovation, and more.

RIT's MBA degree provides you with the flexibility to design the curriculum that best suit your professional aspirations while also providing with the STEM education that is increasingly in demand.

Typical Job Titles

Associate Business Analyst Staff Accountant
Advertising Account Executive Agency Specialist
Cash Management Specialist Customer Analyst
Operations Management Development Program Logistics Coordinator
Operations Research Analyst Valuation Consultant

Cooperative Education

Cooperative education, or co-op for short, is full-time, paid work experience in your field of study. And it sets RIT graduates apart from their competitors. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries. RIT co-op is designed for your success.

Cooperative education in the MBA program is optional. Academic credit is not granted, but formal recording of the co-op experience is made on the student's transcript. Students in good academic standing are eligible for co-op after completing the foundation course, and a substantial portion of their concentration courses. They also must attend a series of co-op and career services workshops. RIT does not guarantee co-op placements.

Explore salary and career information for Business Administration MBA 

Curriculum for Business Administration MBA

Business Administration, MBA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ACCT-603
Accounting for Decision Makers
A graduate-level introduction to the use of accounting information by decision makers. The focus of the course is on two subject areas: (1) financial reporting concepts/issues and the use of general-purpose financial statements by internal and external decision makers and (2) the development and use of special-purpose financial information intended to assist managers in planning and controlling an organization's activities. Generally accepted accounting principles and issues related to International Financial Reporting Standards are considered while studying the first subject area and ethical issues impacting accounting are considered throughout. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
DECS-743
Operations and Supply Chain Management
Study of the management of operations and supply chain management. Encompasses both manufacturing and services. Topics include operations and supply chain strategy, ethical behavior, forecasting; work systems, inventory management, capacity and materials planning, lean operation, supply chain design and closed-loop supply chains, global operations, quality management, quality control, and quality improvement, project management; and current issues. (Prerequisites: DECS-782 or MGIS-650 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ESCB-705
Economics and Decision Modeling
The course focuses on the fundamental economic theories most useful for the management of a firm in a global environment. Microeconomic theories and current events are used to explain the performance of the market system and help managers formulate effective pricing and business decisions. Macroeconomic theories and current events are used to explain the direction of the domestic and global economy to help managers understand the implications, including foreign direct investment, for their companies. Students will learn to explain and predict changes in economic growth, inflation, interest rates, international trade and foreign exchange rates. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
FINC-721
Financial Analysis for Managers
An examination of basic financial theories, techniques, and practices. Topics include: time value of money, valuation, capital asset pricing, risk and diversification, cost of capital, capital budgeting techniques and spreadsheet analysis. (Prerequisites: ACCT-603 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MGIS-650
Introduction to Data Analytics and Business Intelligence
This course serves as an introduction to data analysis including both descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Contemporary data analytics and business intelligence tools will be explored through realistic problem assignments. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MGMT-740
Leading Teams in Organizations
This course examines why people behave as they do in organizations and what managers can do to improve organizational performance by influencing people's behavior. Students will learn a number of frameworks for diagnosing and dealing with managerial challenges dynamics at the individual, group and organizational level. Topics include leadership, motivation, team building, conflict, organizational change, cultures, decision making, and ethical leadership. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MGMT-775
Ethical Decision Making and Corporate Social Performance
This course uses cases, readings, and class discussions to apply concepts of ethics to business at the macro level and at the micro level. At the macro level the course examines competing business ideologies exploring the ethical concerns of capitalism as well as the role of business in society. At the micro level the course examines the role of the manager in establishing an ethical climate with an emphasis on the development of ethical leadership in business organizations. The following topics are typically discussed: the stakeholder theory of the firm, corporate governance, marketing and advertising ethics, the rights and responsibilities of employees, product safety, ethical reasoning, business's responsibility to the environment, moving from a culture of compliance to a culture of integrity, and ethical leadership. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MKTG-761
Marketing Concepts and Commercialization
An introduction to contemporary principles and practices of marketing. The course is structured around the process of marketing planning leading to the development of successful marketing strategies, including the commercialization of products and services in domestic and international environments. Focus is on environmental scanning techniques, setting and evaluating measurable objectives, innovating and controlling the interrelated components of product/service offering, planning and executing the marketing mix (channels of distribution, price, and promotion), and enhancing customer relationships through the delivery of customer value. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
Second Year
 
STEM Electives 
9
 
Open Graduate Electives
6
MGIS-735
Design and Information Systems
Students who complete this course will understand the principles and practices employed to analyze information needs and design appropriate IT-based solutions to address business challenges and opportunities. They will learn how to conduct requirements analysis, approach the design or redesign of business processes, communicate designs decisions to various levels of management, and work in a project-based environment. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MGMT-735
Management of Innovation
This course addresses the management of innovation, sustainable technology, and the importance of technology-based innovation for the growth of the global products and services industries. The course integrates three major themes: (1) leading-edge concepts in innovation, (2) the role of technology in creating global competitive advance in both product-based and services-based industries, and (3) the responsibility of businesses related to sustainability. The importance of digital technology as an enabler of innovative services is covered throughout the course. (completion of four graduate business courses) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MGMT-759
Competitive Strategy
This course reviews the techniques and tools firms use to create a sustainable competitive advantage in the global economy. Cross-functional analysis is a core element in the course. Topics covered include the mission and vision of the firm, analysis of the external environment, analysis of internal resources and capabilities, the role of innovation in strategy development, analysis of global business strategies, developing and implementing business-level and corporate-level strategies, and managing strategy in the multi-business corporation. *Note: All MBA core courses. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
48

STEM Electives

Course
ACCT-645
Accounting Information and Analytics
ACCT-738
Information Systems Auditing and Assurance Services
An examination of the unique risks, controls, and assurance services resulting from and related to auditing financial information systems with an emphasis on enterprise resource systems. (Prerequisites: ACCT-705 or equivalent course. Pre- or Corequisites: ACCT-708 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ACCT-796
Accounting Capstone Experience
The principal focus of this course is students completing several projects provided by members of CPA firms and industry employers. Employers provide assignments, which may include data or require students to gather relevant data, and students use defined technology, which may include a variety of applications common in technological accounting practice, to complete projects in teams. Students also write comprehensive individual reports and analyses related to the projects. Peripheral work in the course includes examination of theoretical concepts, definitions, and models espoused in the accounting literature and relevant to analyzing various contemporary issues in financial accounting and reporting. The historical development of accounting standards and contemporary issues in financial reporting are integrated. The course requires writing and student presentations. Subject to approval by the Program Director, an individual student internship/coop followed by an in-depth report may obtain equivalent credit. Lecture 3 (Spring).
BANA-680
Data Management for Business Analytics
This course introduces students to data management and analytics in a business setting. Students learn how to formulate hypotheses, collect and manage relevant data, and use standard tools such as Python and R in their analyses. The course exposes students to structured data as well as semi-structured and unstructured data. There are no pre or co-requisites; however, instructor permission is required for students not belonging to the MS-Business Analytics or other quantitative programs such as the MS-Computational Finance which have program-level pre-requisites in the areas of calculus, linear algebra, and programming. Lecture 3 (Fall).
BANA-780
Advanced Business Analytics
This course provides foundational, advanced knowledge in the realm of business analytics. Advanced topics such as machine learning, analysis of structured data, text mining, and network analysis are covered. Industry standard tools such as R and Python are extensively used in completing student projects. (Prerequisite: BANA-680 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
BANA-785
Business Analytics Experience
Students apply their mathematical, data analytic, and integrative business analytics skills in a complex project involving real or simulated data. Under the supervision of an advisor, students work in teams to perform a stipulated task/project and write a comprehensive report at the end of the experience. Subject to approval by the program director, an individual student internship/coop followed by an in-depth report may obtain equivalent credit. (Prerequisite: BANA-780 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
CSCI-654
Foundations of Parallel Computing
This course is a study of the hardware and software issues in parallel computing. Topics include an introduction to the basic concepts, parallel architectures and network topologies, parallel algorithms, parallel metrics, parallel languages, granularity, applications, parallel programming design and debugging. Students will become familiar with various types of parallel architectures and programming environments. (Prerequisites: (CSCI-603 and CSCI-605 and CSCI-661 with grades of B or better) or ((CSCI-243 or SWEN-262) and (CSCI-262 or CSCI-263)) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CSCI-721
Foundations of Data Cleaning and Preparation
This course provides an introduction to the concepts and techniques used in preparing data for subsequent data mining. Topics include the knowledge discovery process; data exploration and its role; data extraction, cleaning, integration and transformation; handling numeric, unstructured, text, web, and other forms of data; and ethical issues underlying data preparation and mining. Data cleaning projects, a term paper, and presentations are required. Note: Students who take this course may not take CSCI-521 for credit. (Prerequisites: CSCI-620 or (CSCI-420 and CSCI-320) or (4003-485 and 4003-487) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
DECS-744
Project Management
A study in the principles of project management and the application of various tools and techniques for project planning and control. This course focuses on the leadership role of the project manager, and the roles and responsibilities of the team members. Considerable emphasis is placed on statements of work and work breakdown structures. The course uses a combination of lecture/discussion, group exercises, and case studies. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
DECS-745
Quality Control and Improvement
Study of total quality management (TQM), including Deming’s philosophy, Six Sigma, quality planning, quality cost principles, problem-solving methods and tools, the use of statistical methods for quality control and improvement, supplier relations, and recent developments in quality. The course focus is on the management and continuous improvement of quality and efficiency in manufacturing and service organizations. (Prerequisites: DECS-782 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
DECS-750
Supply Chain Analysis
This course provides an overview of quantitative supply chain modeling and analysis. Accordingly, this course will discuss several strategic, tactical, and operational concepts used in improving the distribution of goods and services throughout the supply chain. The course emphasis is on understanding when and how to use these mathematical programming and optimization methods as well as how to interpret the results for actionable information. (Prerequisites: DECS-743 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
FINC-742
Financial Modeling and Analysis
Students apply computer technology to solve finance-related problems using a variety of analytical methods. Analytical methods include spreadsheet modeling, mathematical optimization, regression, decision tree analysis, and Monte Carlo Simulation. Typical topics covered are financial forecasting, pro-forma financial statements, equity valuation, cash budget forecasts, and portfolio analysis. This is a hands-on course that focuses on collecting, managing and analyzing financial data. (Prerequisites: FINC- 722 and FINC-725 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
FINC-772
Equity Analysis
Students learn about various equity markets, trading, and valuation. The focus of this course is on valuing equities using widely used methods and in forming and analyzing equity portfolios. Students also learn portfolio optimization methods. (Prerequisites: FINC-671 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
FINC-773
Debt Analysis
Students learn about various debt markets, trading, and valuation. The focus of this course is on valuing debt instruments using widely used methods and in forming and analyzing debt portfolios. (Co-requisites: FINC-671 and FINC-721 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
FINC-780
Financial Analytics
This course provides a survey of financial analytics applications in contexts such as investment analysis, portfolio construction, risk management, and security valuation. Students are introduced to financial models used in these applications and their implementation using popular languages such as R, Matlab, and Python, and packages such as Quantlib. A variety of data sources are used: financial websites such as www.finance.yahoo.com, government sites such as www.sec.gov, finance research databases such as WRDS, and especially Bloomberg terminals. Students will complete projects using real-world data and make effective use of visualization methods in reporting results. There are no pre or co-requisites; however, instructor permission is required – student aptitude for quantitative work will be assessed; waived for students enrolled in quantitative programs such as the MS-Computational Finance which have pre-requisites in the areas of calculus, linear algebra, and programming. Lecture 3 (Fall).
FINC-795
Computational Finance Experience
Students apply their mathematical, data analytic, and integrative finance skills in a complex project involving real or simulated data. Under the supervision of an advisor, students work in teams to perform a stipulated task/project and write a comprehensive report at the end of the experience. Subject to approval by the program director, an individual student internship/co-op followed by an in-depth report may obtain equivalent credit. (This course is restricted to CMPFINC-MS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
GRCS-701
Research Methods
This is an introductory graduate-level survey course on research design/methods and analysis. The course provides a broad overview of the process and practices of research in applied contexts. Content includes principles and techniques of research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis including the nature of evidence, types of research, defining research questions, sampling techniques, data collection, data analysis, issues concerning human subjects and research ethics, and challenges associated with conducting research in real-world contexts. The analysis component of the course provides an understanding of statistical methodology used to collect and interpret data found in research as well as how to read and interpret data collection instruments. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
HRDE-745
Information Systems in HRD
The workforce of the future is changing. It is creating challenges for organizations to continue to grow and develop their human capital. The role of the HRD professional is to act strategically, utilizing information system tools to ensure the workforce has the skills to meet the challenges of tomorrow. This course will provide a comprehensive overview of information systems used in HR to develop, assess, and provide data analysis of the workforce to meet the present and evolving needs of the organization. Lecture 3 (Fall).
HSPT-740
Economic Performance Analysis for Hospitality & Tourism
Applications of economic analysis to hospitality and tourism including estimation and prediction of demand and supply, valuation, determination of regional economic impacts, and use of economic analysis in management, marketing, and policy decisions. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
INTB-710
Global Business Analytics
This course is designed to help students, regardless their backgrounds, to identify global business opportunities, possess necessary analytical skills to evaluate these opportunities, and understand the strategies to explore these opportunities to serve transnational businesses’ goals. Students will be exposed to a variety of analytical skill sets such as collecting and analyzing institutional and primary international business data, reading the multinational firm-level data and understanding how global expansion impacts firms’ bottom lines, developing foreign exchange hedging strategies, and apprehending the basic practices of international trade and foreign investment. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
INTB-730
Cross-Cultural Management
An analysis of comparative global business behavior and organization with particular emphasis on values, authority, individual and group relations, labor-management ties, risk tolerance, and motivational techniques. The course will prepare students to recognize different values and cultural factors in the global business community and how these shape and determine appropriate management behavior. The problems and opportunities of transferring management practices from one culture to another will also be examined. Lecture .
ISEE-682
Lean Six Sigma Fundamentals
This course presents the philosophy and methods that enable participants to develop quality strategies and drive process improvements. The fundamental elements of Lean Six Sigma are covered along with many problem solving and statistical tools that are valuable in driving process improvements in a broad range of business environments and industries. Successful completion of this course is accompanied by “yellow belt” certification and provides a solid foundation for those who also wish to pursue a “green belt.” (Green belt certification requires completion of an approved project which is beyond the scope of this course). (This course is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students and dual degree BS/MS or BS/ME students in KGCOE.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
ISEE-682
Lean Six Sigma Fundamentals
This course presents the philosophy and methods that enable participants to develop quality strategies and drive process improvements. The fundamental elements of Lean Six Sigma are covered along with many problem solving and statistical tools that are valuable in driving process improvements in a broad range of business environments and industries. Successful completion of this course is accompanied by “yellow belt” certification and provides a solid foundation for those who also wish to pursue a “green belt.” (Green belt certification requires completion of an approved project which is beyond the scope of this course). (This course is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students and dual degree BS/MS or BS/ME students in KGCOE.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
ISEE-703
Supply Chain Management
Supply chain management is unique in that it is one of the oldest business activities and yet has been recently discovered as a potentially powerful source of competitive advantage. Supply chain system activities planning production levels, forecasting demand, managing inventory, warehousing, transportation, and locating facilities have been performed since the start of commercial activity. It is difficult to visualize any product that could reach a customer without a consciously designed supply chain. Yet it is only recently that many firms have started focusing on supply chain management. There is a realization that no company can do any better than its supply chain and logistics systems. This becomes even more important given that product life cycles are shrinking and competition is intense. Logistics and supply chain management today represents a great challenge as well as a tremendous opportunity for most firms. (This course is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or ISE department dual degree students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MATH-601
Methods of Applied Mathematics
This course is an introduction to classical techniques used in applied mathematics. Models arising in physics and engineering are introduced. Topics include dimensional analysis, scaling techniques, regular and singular perturbation theory, and calculus of variations. (Prerequisites: MATH-221 and MATH-231 or equivalent courses or students in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MATH-605
Stochastic Processes
This course is an introduction to stochastic processes and their various applications. It covers the development of basic properties and applications of Poisson processes and Markov chains in discrete and continuous time. Extensive use is made of conditional probability and conditional expectation. Further topics such as renewal processes, reliability and Brownian motion may be discussed as time allows. (Prerequisites: ((MATH-241 or MATH-241H) and MATH-251) or equivalent courses or graduate standing in ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD or APPSTAT-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MATH-711
Advanced Methods in Scientific Computing
MATH-712
Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
This is an advanced course in numerical methods that introduces students to computational techniques for solving partial differential equations, especially those arising in applications. Topics include: finite difference methods for hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic partial differential equations, consistency, stability and convergence of finite difference schemes. (Prerequisite: MATH-702 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MATH-735
Mathematics of Finance I
This is the first course in a sequence that examines mathematical and statistical models in finance. By taking a mathematical viewpoint the course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the assumptions and limitations of the quantitative models used in finance. Topics include probability rules and distributions, the binomial and Black-Scholes models of derivative pricing, interest and present value, and ARCH and GARCH time series techniques. The course is mathematical in nature and assumes a background in calculus (including Taylor series), linear algebra and basic probability. Other mathematical concepts and numerical methods are introduced as needed. (Prerequisites: ((MATH-241 or MATH-241H) and MATH-251) or equivalent courses or graduate standing in the ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD or CMPFINC-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MATH-736
Mathematics of Finance II
This is the second course in a sequence that examines mathematical and statistical models in finance. By taking a mathematical viewpoint the course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the assumptions and limitations of the quantitative models used in finance. Topics include delta hedging, introduction to Ito calculus, interest rate models and Monte Carlo simulations. The course is mathematical in nature and assumes a background in calculus (including Taylor series), linear algebra and basic probability. Other mathematical concepts and numerical methods are introduced as needed. (Prerequisites: MATH-735 or equivalent course or students in ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD or CMPFINC-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MATH-741
Partial Differential Equations I
This course uses methods of applied mathematics in the solution of problems in physics and engineering. Models such as heat flow and vibrating strings will be formulated from physical principles. Characteristics methods, maximum principles, Green's functions, D'Alembert formulas, weak solutions and distributions will be studied. (Prerequisites: MATH-231 or equivalent course or graduate student standing in ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MATH-742
Partial Differential Equations II
This is a continuation of Partial Differential Equations I and deals with advanced methods for solving partial differential equations arising in physics and engineering problems. Topics to be covered include second order equations, Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem, the method of descent, spherical means, Duhamels principle, and Greens function in higher dimensions. (Prerequisites: MATH-741 or equivalent course or students in ACMTH-MS or MATHML-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MGIS-720
Information Systems Design
This course provides students with fundamental knowledge and skills required for successful analysis of problems and opportunities related to the flow of information within organizations and the design and implementation of information systems to address identified factors. Students are provided with knowledge and experience that will be useful in determining systems requirements and developing a logical design. Lecture 3 (Fall).
MGIS-725
Data Management and Analytics
This course discusses issues associated with data capture, organization, storage, extraction, and modeling for planned and ad hoc reporting. Enables student to model data by developing conceptual and semantic data models. Techniques taught for managing the design and development of large database systems including logical data models, concurrent processing, data distributions, database administration, data warehousing, data cleansing, and data mining. Lecture 3 (Spring).
MGIS-760
Integrated Business Systems
This course focuses on the concepts and technologies associated with Integrated Business Information Systems and the managerial decisions related to the implementation and ongoing application of these systems. Topics include business integration and common patterns of systems integration technology including enterprise resource planning (ERP), enterprise application integration (EAI) and data integration. The key managerial and organizational issues in selecting the appropriate technology and successful implementation are discussed. Hands-on experience with the SAP R/3 system is utilized to enable students to demonstrate concepts related to integrated business systems. (familiarity with MS Office suite and Internet browsers) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MGIS-761
Business Process Analysis and Workflow Design
MGMT-741
Managing Organizational Change
This course addresses the importance of organizational change in maintaining a flexible, dynamic, and responsive organization, by examining various theories and approaches currently used to assist organizations in achieving planned change. The role of the leader in achieving organizational change is emphasized. The features of successful change in organizations will be discussed, including the structural, motivational, interpersonal, and social aspects of organizational change. (Prerequisites: MGMT-740 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MGMT-755
Negotiations
This course is designed to teach the art and science of negotiation so that one can negotiate successfully in a variety of settings, within one's day-to-day experiences and, especially, within the broad spectrum of negotiation problems faced by managers and other professionals. Individual class sessions will explore the many ways that people think about and practice negotiation skills and strategies in a variety of contexts. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MGMT-756
Power and Influence
Power and influence processes are pervasive and an important part of organizational life. This course has as its objectives enhancing the understanding of these processes and increasing the student's skills in using them. Topics covered include the conditions under which power and politics are more likely to dominate decision processes, assessing the relative power of various actors, understanding the basis for their positions on issues, the sources of both individual and departmental power, power and influence strategies and tactics, and some functional and dysfunctional aspects of organizational politics for both individuals and the organizations involved. (Prerequisites: MGMT-740 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).
MKTG-763
Buyer Behavior
The course reviews the major theories that frame the understanding of both consumer (end-user) and business buying behavior. Topics include the buying decision process, the impact of emotion, product knowledge, and product involvement on purchasing decisions. In addition, behavioral, social and psychological perspectives will be discussed. All perspectives will be applied to designing marketing strategy. (Prerequisites: MKTG-761 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MKTG-768
Marketing Analytics
This course provides an overview of marketing analytics in the context of marketing research, product portfolios, social media monitoring, sentiment analysis, customer retention, clustering techniques, and customer lifetime value calculation. Students will be introduced to, mathematical and statistical models used in these applications and their implementation using statistical tools and programming languages such as SAS, SPSS, Python and R. Multiple data sources will be used ranging from structured data from company databases, scanner data, social media data, text data in the form of customer reviews, and research databases. Students will complete guided projects using real time data and make effective use of visualization to add impact to their reports. There are no listed pre or co-requisites; however, instructor permission is required – student aptitude for quantitative work will be assessed; waived for students enrolled in quantitative programs such as the MS-Computational Finance which have pre-requisites in the areas of calculus, linear algebra, and programming. Lecture 3 (Spring).
MKTG-772
Internet Marketing: Strategy & Tactics
This course examines the impact that the internet has on traditional and contemporary business-to-consumer marketing activities. It explores these implications in both strategic and tactical terms to enhance organizations' levels of competitiveness. The course identifies the use of the internet in enhancing value for consumers and considers the leverage of the latest technologies, trends, e-culture and innovation through the medium of the internet. (Prerequisites: MKTG-761 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MKTG-773
Database Marketing
PROF-711
Advanced Project Management
SERQ-723
Service Analytics
Analytics in service organizations is based on four phases: analysis and determination of what data to collect, gathering the data, analyzing it, and communicating the findings to others. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of analytics to develop a measurement strategy for a given area of research and analysis. While this measurement process is used to ensure that operations function well and customer needs are met; the real power of measurement lies in using analytics predicatively to drive growth and service, to transform the organization and the value delivered to customers. Topics include big data, the role of measurement in growth and innovation, methodologies to measure quality, and other intangibles. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
SERQ-732
Assessment of Service Quality
The service sector encompasses a large and varied arena making the assessment of service quality challenging. This course will provide quality evaluation strategies which span a variety of service sectors. To build a comprehensive picture of public and private sector quality service indicators will be reviewed as well as strategies to assess service quality. Each of these approaches will be analyzed, discussed and evaluated for the output generated. To assist with this overview, the Serve/Qual model, including the identification of service standards to meet and exceed customer expectations, will be used to evaluate service quality. Lecture 3 (Fall).
SERQ-735
Data Mining in the Service Sector
To gather and analyze public/private service sector information to inform decisions is the goal of every public/private sector administration. Data can drive success of governments and organizations or lead to their downfall. This course will explore data mining used in the public/private sector, how to gather it and utilize the results of the data collections to inform decisions that reflect the needs and desires of the stakeholders in this sector. Lecture 3 (Fall).
SERQ-745
Social Psychology of Service
Service interactions are an increasing segment of human interactions in today’s society. This course will examine service relationships, encounters and experiences from the perspective of human motivation and relating existing theories of social psychology to the delivery of services. An analysis of the interactions of customers and employees will help the student restrain their use of intuition and overlay critical thinking skills with human dynamics. The areas to be included in this course include; emotional intelligence, reciprocity, persuasion, conflict and communication, motivation, diversity, retention, and other related theories. Lecture 3 (Summer).
SERQ-747
Design Thinking and Creativity
The use of creative problem solving to discover new alternatives in the design of products and services is the essence of design thinking. The innovation design thinking process seeks creative inspiration to solve a problem, generating and selecting ideas to develop a path from design to market. Design thinking tools and strategies are discussed as are “Wicked Problems” and the impact design thinking can have on developing a solution for these problems. An in-depth approach uses stories and prototypes to design products/ services in an effort to solve problems in an innovative and sustainable manner. Lecture 3 (Fall).
STAT-611
Statistical Software - R
This course is an introduction to the statistical-software package R, which is often used in professional practice. Some comparisons with other statistical-software packages will also be made. Topics include: data structures; reading and writing data; data manipulation, subsetting, reshaping, sorting, and merging; conditional execution and looping; built-in functions; creation of new functions; graphics; matrices and arrays; simulations and app development with Shiny. (This course is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-621
Statistical Quality Control
A practical course designed to provide in-depth understanding of the principles and practices of statistical process control, process capability, and acceptance sampling. Topics include: statistical concepts relating to processes, Shewhart charts for attribute and variables data, CUSUM charts, EWMA charts, process capability studies, attribute and variables acceptance sampling techniques. (This class is restricted to students in the APPSTAT-MS, SMPPI-ACT, STATQL-ACT or MMSI-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-747
Principles of Statistical Data Mining
This course covers topics such as clustering, classification and regression trees, multiple linear regression under various conditions, logistic regression, PCA and kernel PCA, model-based clustering via mixture of gaussians, spectral clustering, text mining, neural networks, support vector machines, multidimensional scaling, variable selection, model selection, k-means clustering, k-nearest neighbors classifiers, statistical tools for modern machine learning and data mining, naïve Bayes classifiers, variance reduction methods (bagging) and ensemble methods for predictive optimality. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT who have successfully completed STAT-611, STAT-731 and STAT-741 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-756
Multivariate Analysis
Multivariate data are characterized by multiple responses. This course concentrates on the mathematical and statistical theory that underlies the analysis of multivariate data. Some important applied methods are covered. Topics include matrix algebra, the multivariate normal model, multivariate t-tests, repeated measures, MANOVA principal components, factor analysis, clustering, and discriminant analysis. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT who have successfully completed STAT-611 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-773
Time Series Analysis and Forecasting
This course is designed to provide the student with a solid practical hands-on introduction to the fundamentals of time series analysis and forecasting. Topics include stationarity, filtering, differencing, time series decomposition, time series regression, exponential smoothing, and Box-Jenkins techniques. Within each of these we will discuss seasonal and nonseasonal models. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT who have successfully completed STAT-741 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-784
Categorical Data Analysis
The course develops statistical methods for modeling and analysis of data for which the response variable is categorical. Topics include: contingency tables, matched pair analysis, Fisher's exact test, logistic regression, analysis of odds ratios, log linear models, multi-categorical logit models, ordinal and paired response analysis. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT who have successfully completed STAT-741 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MBA program, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete an online graduate application. Refer to Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements for information on application deadlines, entry terms, and more.
  • Submit copies of official transcript(s) (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work, including any transfer credit earned.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or US equivalent) from an accredited university or college. 
  • Recommended minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.
  • Letters of recommendation are optional.
  • Not all programs require the submission of scores from entrance exams (GMAT or GRE). Please refer to the Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements page for more information.
  • Submit a personal statement of educational objectives. Refer to Application Instructions and Requirements for additional information.
  • Have college level credit or practical experience in algebra and statistics
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit official test scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. Students below the minimum requirement may be considered for conditional admission. Refer to Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements for additional information on English requirements. International applicants may be considered for an English test requirement waiver. Refer to Additional Requirements for International Applicants to review waiver eligibility.

Applications are accepted for fall, spring, and summer semesters. Students may complete their studies on a full- or part-time basis.

For further information about program specific GMAT/GRE waiver opportunities, tips on personal statements, and additional guidance on how to submit a successful application, please visit Saunders College of Business Admissions Requirements.

Completed applications for admission should be on file in the Office of Graduate and Part-time Enrollment at least four weeks prior to registration for the next academic semester for students from the United States, and up to 10 weeks prior for international students applying for student visas.

Non-degree course enrollment

Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B grade) or better may be eligible to apply to take up to two approved graduate courses before being fully admitted to the MBA Program. Students can complete the required non-degree application through Saunders. Graduate credits earned as a non-degree student may be applied to the student's degree program.

Waiver policy/transfer credit

The MBA normally requires 48 credit hours, however, students may be able to waive some MBA foundation courses. Prior academic preparation must be from an institution accredited by AACSB International or partner institution and the course work must be equivalent to RIT's MBA foundation courses. Prior course work must be completed within the last five years, with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Foundation courses may be waived either outright or through an examination.

A maximum of 9 credit hours may be awarded as transfer credit from other graduate programs. The courses must be relevant to the MBA program, taken within the last five years at an institution accredited by AACSB International, and the student must have earned a grade of B (3.0) or better.

Credits for waiver, transfer, or undergraduate courses are not counted in the GPA computation. Students must request transfer/waiver credit.

Deferment

Accepted students can defer enrollment for up to one year. After one year, a new application must be submitted and will be re-evaluated based on the most current admission standards.

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

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