Programs of Study / Minors

Students pursuing a bachelor’s degree have the option of completing a minor, which can complement a student’s major, help them develop another area of professional expertise, or enable them to pursue an area of personal interest. Completion of a minor is formally designated on the baccalaureate transcript, which serves to highlight this accomplishment to employers and graduate schools. In contrast to the optional minor, as part of their bachelor's degree requirements, students must complete an immersion—a concentration of three courses in a particular area.

Please note: A minor is a related set of academic courses consisting of no fewer than 15 credit hours. The following parameters must be met in order to earn a minor:

  • At least nine credit hours of the minor must consist of courses not required by the student’s home major.
  • Students may pursue multiple minors. A minimum of nine credit hours must be designated towards each minor; these courses may not be counted towards other minors.
  • The residency requirement for a minor is a minimum of nine credit hours consisting of RIT courses (excluding “X” graded courses).

Not all minors are approved to fulfill general education requirements. Please check with an adviser in regards to minors approved to fulfill these requirements.

The 2D studio arts minor allows students to develop and refine the practices inherent in the production of two-dimensional fine art forms, including drawing, painting, printmaking, and photography. Students develop conceptual, analytical, and technical skills in these media while learning to connect inspiration and ideation to creative visual expression in two dimensions. Once the two required introductory courses are completed, students may use elective courses to explore diverse two-dimensional media, such as painting, printmaking, and photography, or they may choose to work more intensively within one medium.

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The 3D digital design minor provides a foundation in designing visual elements using three-dimensional digital software for a range of applications.  Courses cover topics such as modeling, motion, lighting, materials, and rendering. Advanced electives explore real time design including topics related specifically to topology, textures, level of detail, and other techniques important to real time applications. Please note: Enrollment is based on available space and a portfolio review is required before acceptance into the minor.

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The minor in 3D studio arts allows students to develop and refine the practices required for the production of three-dimensional art in various media. Students will develop conceptual, spatial, analytical, and technical skills while working through the process of art making from ideation to the production of creative visual expression in three dimensions.

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Accounting is necessary in a wide variety of careers. Students completing an accounting minor will broaden their learning experiences and professional opportunities by gaining more depth in operational accounting topics.

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The advertising and public relations minor prepares students to analyze audiences, write advertising copy, prepare press releases, select media, and manage broad-scaled persuasive campaigns. Students are grounded in the basic theories of persuasive communication enabling them to create persuasive messages with a strong emphasis on ethical decision-making.

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This minor provides students with an opportunity to study the American arts in a variety of disciplines, including painting, architecture, film, photography, music, theatre, and the mass media. Courses present American art within the context of the broader current of American life, including its history, philosophy, social, and cultural traditions.

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The purpose of the American politics minor is to study the basic principles and institutions of the American political order and their implications for current political practice. The strengths and limitations of American constitutionalism are emphasized throughout and contemporary political and policy questions facing the country are examined.

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The American Sign Language and deaf cultural studies minor prepares students in the multidisciplinary study of American Sign Language and deaf culture. The minor is open to hearing and deaf students enrolled in all bachelor's degree programs. Courses in the minor address topics in the field of ASL and DCS including the study of ASL and its structure, ASL literature, literature in English pertaining to the D/deaf experience, the history of D/deaf people in America and around the world, Deaf art and cinema, the experience of D/deaf people from racial, ethnic, and other minority groups, oppression in the lives D/deaf people, and various political, legal, and educational issues affecting members of the D/deaf community. The minor complements majors in fields such as business, imaging arts and sciences, health sciences, policy studies, professional and technical communication, psychology, and numerous scientific and technical fields.

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The minor in anthropology and sociology offers disciplinary insights on understanding human social life, both from local and global perspectives. Through anthropology we discover and appreciate the diversity of other cultural systems on a global scale. Through sociology we discover how our own lives are influenced by social relationships around us. Careful selection of courses provides insights into a wide range of topics such as human history and prehistory through archaeology, gender and sexuality, race, ethnicity, social class, inequality, health, urban life and cities, cultural images and mass media, war and violence, social movements, social and cultural change, and globalization.

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The applied statistics minor provides an opportunity for students to deepen their technical background and gain further appreciation for modern mathematical sciences and the use of statistics as an analytical tool.

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Archaeology is the study of the human past, principally by means of the physical residue of past human behavior. Archaeological science is the application of techniques from the physical sciences to research problems in archaeology and related disciplines. Over the past six decades archaeological science has provided powerful tools for understanding the past, ranging from absolute dating to bone chemistry. It has become an established sub-field within the discipline of archaeology, which itself has grown during the same period from a discipline largely focused on cultural history (the use of artifacts to reconstruct regional cultural sequences) and the validation of documentary history to the explanation of the processes of cultural change in the past.

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In the art history minor students explore the history of art, architecture, craft, design, photography, and aesthetic theory across multiple cultures, eras, and intellectual perspectives. Art historians examine a society’s artistic production, analyzing form, content, and process to better understand how art expresses meaning within specific cultural contexts. Students completing this minor will be able to use art historical and related methodologies to evaluate works of art, formulate a history of artistic styles, analyze art in relation to its historical setting, and engage with the world of contemporary art. The minor's emphasis on writing and critical thinking complements any academic program while the inclusion of visual analysis, historical context, and theoretical approaches to artistic production make this a useful addition for students seeking careers in areas such as the fine arts, education, design, communication, game design, museum and gallery work, or digital humanities.

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This minor provides students with an opportunity for additional study in astronomy in order to build a secondary area of expertise in support of their major or other areas of interest. It will provide students with a broad foundational background in astronomy in preparation for graduate studies in astronomy or astrophysics. The minor is interdisciplinary and offered jointly by the School of Physics and Astronomy and the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science.

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The bioinformatics analysis minor immerses students in the core challenges and strengths of the field of bioinformatics, as well as the ethical issues involved. Students gain hands-on experience implementing some of the core algorithms utilized by professionals in the field.

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The biology: cellular and molecular minor provides students with opportunities to experience and explore topics related to both the cellular and molecular aspects of modern biology to broaden and enhance their educational experience.

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The biology: ecology and evolution minor provides students with the opportunity to experience both the ecological and evolutionary underpinnings of modern biology. The minor explores these areas of biology through laboratory and field experiences.

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The interdisciplinary minor in black studies examines the social construction of racial differences and its relation to the perpetuation of racism and racial domination. A key component of this minor is an investigation of the meanings and dimensions of blackness that reverberate from slavery and colonialism to the persistent political, social, and cultural implications in the 21st century. The minor emphasizes how blackness intersects with other ethnic identities and how it is shaped by gender, sexuality, and economic inequities. The aim is to refine and advance students’ knowledge of black life-worlds and experiences across the globe.

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This minor is appropriate for undergraduate students interested in broad exposure to the world of business. Undergraduate students interested in pursuing an MBA degree may use this minor to fulfill certain MBA bridge courses.

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The minor in chemical engineering systems analysis provides students with a sophisticated understanding of the application of scientific knowledge to the solution of a vast array of practical problems in which chemistry plays a critical role. Students are taught the systems methodologies that chemical engineers employ to analyze and solve real world problems involving distinct chemical components, chemical reaction, multiple phases, and mass transfer.

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Chemistry is intrinsically a part of our society from the fuels we use, the air we breathe, and the water we drink to the complex chemical behaviors of our own bodies. Chemistry is involved in the development of myriad materials such as computer chips, packaging materials, and alternative fuels. Increasing numbers of policy and ethical choices facing the global community involve issues where chemistry plays a pivotal role. This minor provides students with the opportunity to study chemistry in order to build a secondary area of expertise in support of their major or as an additional area of interest.

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The communication minor offers students a foundation in human communication theories, research, and skills. Students select courses in mass media analysis, communication in professional and organizational contexts, communication skills, and critical reflection of and on communication in society.

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The computer engineering minor provides students with a foundation in digital systems design, an understanding of computer organization, and an introduction to embedded systems programming.  Students build on this core through elective courses in the areas of hardware design, architectures, networks and systems.

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In the computer science minor students explore an in-depth study of programming or sample selected theoretical or applied areas within the computer science field. At least two of the four electives must have course numbers of 300 or higher and students with the proper prerequisites may use graduate-level computer science courses toward the minor.

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With the prevalence of mobile computing, the advantages of cloud computing, the ubiquity of computing in general, and the issues of securing big data caused by the world-wide explosion of eBusiness and eCommerce today, secure computing environments and appropriate information management have become critical issues to all sizes and types of organizations. Therefore, there is a vital and growing need for all computing professionals to have a foundation in the issues critical to information security and how they apply to their specific disciplines. The minor consists of two required courses and three electives chosen by the student from the computing security advanced course clusters. There are many elective course choices to provide flexibility. Therefore, the minor provides any computing major outside of the computing security degree program with basic knowledge of the issues and technologies associated with computing security and allows students the opportunity to select a set of security electives that are complementary to their majors. Before beginning the minor in students must possess prerequisite knowledge that can be obtained from various programming sequences and courses in calculus and discrete math.

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The construction management minor broadens the learning experiences and professional opportunities of students who have an interest in building construction, bid development, management of construction projects after a successful bid, and the business, management, and technical aspects related to construction.

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Students pursuing the craft and material studies minor will develop knowledge of specific media, including wood, metal, ceramics, glass, and textiles. Students will study the material properties of these media and hone technical skills while expanding and applying critical thinking skills as they work through design process from ideation to fabrication. Students will also learn about expected working practices within collaborative studio spaces and within the discipline more broadly.

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The series of courses in the creative writing minor offers students a practical, theoretical, and historical understanding of the art and craft of writing nonfiction and fiction prose and poetry, as well as experimenting in digital storytelling and interactive media. The minor encourages students to use those skills and insights for interdisciplinary projects and the enrichment of their careers and personal lives.

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The criminal justice minor provides a foundation in the formal process of social control through the criminal justice system, how behavior is defined as criminal, how crime is measured, and how society responds to crime.

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The database design and development minor provides a cohesive set of courses that elevates students from a foundational level to advanced knowledge of database systems and the database development process. Students learn the basics of data modeling, the relational model, normalization, and Structured Query Language (SQL). Students also learn the skills needed to effectively capture requirements, compose data models that accurately reflect those requirements, develop programs that establish lines of communication with back-end databases, build and manage large databases, and learn methods for designing and developing data warehouses. 

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Digital business represents the impact of new technologies on business practice, products, and services. Today, social computing and mobile devices are dramatically changing the behaviors and characteristics that lead individuals and organizations to success. Through this minor students enhance their major with a focus on these new technologies and their application in business.

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The courses in the digital literatures and comparative media minor challenge students to think about how the digital in new comparative media affects the way we read, study, and understand literature: What happens to literature and the literary in an age of digital technology and new forms of media? Courses examine a varied collection of print genres and electronic literature in order to understand the current state of this new literary field and its relation to traditional concepts of literary study. The minor provides an entry point into investigating particular aspects of the general category of the digital and its comparative relation to the the literary.

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An economics minor provides a systematic analysis of economic issues through the study of the allocation of scarce resources into production and the distribution of production among the members of society.

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Electrical engineering encompasses disciplines such as electronics, communication, control, digital systems, and signal/image processing. A minor in electrical engineering provides a foundation to explore specialized material in electrical engineering. The minor provides students from other engineering or non-engineering disciplines an introduction to the wide-ranging content of the electrical engineering major.

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The minor in engineering management integrates technological and managerial expertise while focusing on the management of these areas. Engineering management is concerned with understanding the technology involved in an engineering project and the management process through which the technology is applied.

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The English minor allows students to explore literature and other cultural works, as well as linguistics, and creative writing. The minor familiarizes students with works composed or translated into English and provides them with the opportunity to explore a variety of historical periods and geographical regions. Courses in the minor explore literary genres such as science fiction and fantasy; literary forms such as the novel, the short story, poetry, and graphic storytelling; and literary practices across media and multimedia arts. The minor builds an awareness of methods, theories and technologies for both the creation and analysis of literary texts, and provides an introduction to critical or creative writing.

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The entrepreneurship minor allows students to learn business skills that can be applied to any professional field. Students gain insight into the customer requirements and financial implications involved in taking a product or service from idea to implementation.

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The environmental modeling minor introduces students to the process of spatial modeling as part of a tool set for investigating environmental issues and provides opportunities to apply these skills through advanced course work. Courses are designed to give students a solid foundation of environmental issues and concepts. Central to this minor are the development of geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing techniques, problem-solving skills, and an understanding of the multiple stakeholder perspectives often involved with environmental issues.

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The environmental science minor introduces students to the interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues and concepts and provides opportunities to further investigate these issues through advanced course work. Central to this minor is the development of field, analytical, and problem-solving skills and an understanding of the multiple stakeholder perspectives often involved with environmental issues.

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With an emphasis on sustainability and holistic thinking, the environmental studies minor provides students with opportunities for the in-depth analysis of global and regional environmental issues, their causes, and their potential solutions. In particular, a required 500-level seminar serves as a capstone experience, helping students to integrate knowledge from several disciplinary perspectives, including socio-cultural, historical, political, economic, ethical, scientific, and/or technological factors. Having completed the minor, students will possess a high level of environmental literacy, an important component of many professional fields within the sciences, engineering, law, journalism, and public affairs.

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The ethics minor provides students with the ability to recognize ethical issues and to think critically to resolve them, both generally and within their chosen discipline. Students also learn how ethical problems can result from complex social structures and how changing structural features may avoid ethical problems. Three courses in philosophy are required plus two electives from the approved list, at least one of which must be outside philosophy. Only one 100-level course may be counted as part of the minor.

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The exercise science minor includes foundation sequences in anatomy and physiology upon which the basic principles of exercise physiology, fitness assessment, and the preparation of fitness programs are built. The minor prepares students to sit for professional certification examinations for work in the fitness industry, provides understanding of sports physiology for those interested in sports equipment design and technology, and complements and enhances personal fitness.

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Film studies explores the role of cinema in our contemporary global culture. Using methodologies and perspectives from a variety of disciplines, such as English, anthropology, philosophy, fine arts/visual culture, political science, history, and modern languages, the film studies minor investigates cinema’s mass appeal as a form of entertainment, but also the power it wields as a disseminator of ideas, history, values, aesthetics, behavior, and cultural norms.

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The finance minor helps students create value in any type of business organization. The minor broadens a student's learning experiences and professional opportunities by focusing on corporate finance and investment topics in more depth.

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The flexible packaging minor addresses flexible containment systems, one of the fastest growing segments of the packaging materials industry. The manufacturing and use of flexible containment systems requires specific expertise and knowledge of appropriate technology for implementation. Flexible pouches and containment systems are considered more sustainable for replacing glass bottles and jars, plastic bottles, and metal cans. They use materials more efficiently and reduce the weight and costs associated with physical distribution activities.

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Free and open source software is released with licenses that allow it to be redistributed freely for others to use, copy, and/or modify within certain restrictions and conditions. Free culture refers to writing, art, music, and other creative materials released with rights for reuse and/or redistribution that are more flexible than those of the traditional marketplace. Both are often created and/or distributed by collaborative teams with members around the world. The minor in free and open source software and free culture is intended for students who want to develop a deep understanding of the processes, practices, technologies, financial, legal, and societal impacts of these movements. The minor includes a set of computing and liberal arts courses that explore these aspects through research, analysis, and participation in these communities via the creation of digital cultural artifacts and team-driven software projects. Students complete three required courses, one constrained elective course, and one elective course.

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The game design and development minor is intended for students studying in a technical field who want to combine their knowledge and skill in software development with the media-centric approach to application design that is exemplified in the professional games and simulation industries. The minor defines a series of courses that build upon students’ existing knowledge in computing, physics, and mathematics to explore the design principles of games and interactive worlds through the creation of prototypes and software projects.

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The game design minor is intended for students outside of technical computing majors who wants to explore the process and principles of game design and the associated theories of interactive media. The minor provides an introductory experience to media-centric software development that enables students to prototype and test their designs.

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The geographic information systems (GIS) minor provides students with experience in the concepts, technology, and applications related to computer-based mapping, spatial databases, and geographic analysis and problem solving. The minor features two tracks: a GIS development track for students interested in GIS software development, and a GIS analysis track for students interested in utilizing GIS as a strong methodological base within their major of study. Required courses provide core GIS foundations applicable to a variety of multidisciplinary elective courses students can choose from to match their research, post-graduate, or career interests.

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The global literatures and cultures minor offers a rich variety of courses for students curious about global literatures and the different forms they take across cultures, from epic poetry to contemporary film. Students examine aspects of globalization and the human condition through multiple cultural lenses, better preparing them for the complex global workplace of the 21st century. Given the diverse, international backgrounds of our faculty, students learn how literary imaginations of all types are transmitted across historical epochs and national boundaries using a range of old and new material technologies.

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The impact of global change is dramatic and far-reaching, altering the dynamics of everyday life on a planetary scale. The minor in globalization provides students with the opportunity to think creatively about a range of globalizing processes, theories, and practices (in cultural, political, social, biomedical, economic, and artistic contexts). Courses investigate issues pertinent to the phenomenon of globalization, including cultural exchange; multicultural communities; global governance; information transfer; and social, environmental, health, and labor issues. Accelerated by communication technologies, globalization redefines how individuals and communities experience and view the world.

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All societies have some cultural ideas and belief systems about health and wellness. Culture shapes our understanding of bodily processes. Because of the significant influence of culture on perceptions and experiences of health and wellness, this minor thematizes the shifting cultural configurations of health in a globalizing world. Culturally grounded health and illness concepts, including notions about bodily integrity or emotional well-being, cultural models of illness causation and diagnostic practices, and the experiences, expressions, and treatments of human ailments unfold in concrete socio-cultural contexts. The courses in this minor provide an enhanced cultural understanding about health experiences in different parts of the world.

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The health communication minor provides students with theoretical and applied knowledge about communication’s role in health care delivery, doctor-patient communication, health campaigns and public health, and other areas related to the dissemination of health information. This collaborative minor is designed for students interested in health care fields or health and risk communication.

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Medical informatics, also known as health information technology or health IT, is experiencing a period of rapid growth fueled by the federal government’s push for universal adoption of electronic health records. The health IT minor teaches students with a computing background how to develop and maintain software systems in the health care field. One year of object-oriented programming and an introductory database course are required prerequisites. Five required courses give students the skills they need to design and develop computing systems for the health care environment.

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The history minor provides students with a foundation in the academic study of history. It serves as a complement to any professional degree, as historical study at the college level hones the skills that are important to any well-trained professional: namely, effective writing, critical analysis, engaged reading, and logical thinking. Students are free to shape the history minor to their liking, by choosing the geographic areas of historical study of most interest to them, such as American, European, or Asian, or by choosing the historical topic of most interest to them, such as transnational history, comparative history, war, business, race, or gender.

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Hospitality industries and related entrepreneurial businesses include those in lodging, resorts, food, entertainment, events and conventions, and tourism. The hospitality management minor provides an opportunity to learn about service–oriented businesses that are a significant portion of the economies of many countries.

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Imaging science is a highly interdisciplinary field of study that incorporates elements from mathematics, engineering, computer science, and physics to understand, design, and utilize imagery and imaging systems to study scientific phenomena. The imaging science minor is designed to allow students from various departments across RIT to study how to use imaging to enhance their primary field of study or discover how to incorporate imaging science into their major discipline to solve complex, interdisciplinary problems in imaging, imagery exploitation, and the design and evaluation of imaging systems.

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The imaging systems minor offers students an introduction to the business and technology of photographic imaging services. Courses cover digital imaging capture systems, professional practices, output technologies, color management, and imaging workflows. The minor provides the foundation students need to pursue opportunities in photo technology management, color workflows, technical support, digital imaging technology, and sales for photography and imaging manufacturers.

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A minor in industrial engineering focuses on the design, improvement, and installation of integrated systems of people, materials, equipment, and energy. Students utilize skills in statistics, ergonomics, operations research, and manufacturing.

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The innovation minor enables students from across all of RIT's colleges to develop the necessary skills, knowledge, and experiences to become innovators in areas of interest related to their individual academic and professional goals. The core of the minor helps students to define innovation; understand past and current trends in innovation, as well as the processes and practical considerations for innovating; and gain experience at innovating through project-based, interdisciplinary experiential learning and collaborative activities. Students customize the minor by taking innovation elective courses that explore an area of personal and/or professional interest within the boundaries of the larger minor. The minor is inter-disciplinary in its approach and fosters multi-college collaboration as it allows students to select discipline-specific courses, sourced from across the university, as their innovation elective courses.

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Students who select the international business minor benefit from learning the global view of worldwide markets and the role of business in these environments.

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The international relations minor helps students to make sense of the world through exploring ideas that have shaped it. Students explore the thoughts of various thinkers and approaches to international relations and use these perspectives to understand key themes in world politics. Important topics include democratization, globalization, terrorism, war and peace, human rights, and international law. Students reflect upon the interplay between domestic and international politics and how changes in the world order affect the internal politics of various countries.

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The journalism minor provides students with a foundation in the professional study and practice of journalism. Courses offer a broad perspective that includes historical, legal, and ethical issues of specific concern to journalism, as well as learning and practice writing in a journalistic style for delivery across multiple media platforms.

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The language science minor prepares students for the study and analysis of human language. The minor is directly applicable to students interested in computing and media, human-computer interaction, brain and cognition, language acquisition, human health, interpreting, relevant branches of engineering, and policy studies. Students can complete the minor requirements irrespective of their skills in languages other than English. Electives allow students to customize the minor to their interests and needs, with the support of a faculty adviser. The minor is an excellent complement to majors such as computer science, game design, information technology, psychology, sign language interpreting, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, bioengineering, science, or a foreign language.

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The Latino/Latina/Latin American studies minor provides at least two full years of instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor's five courses foster cultural, or linguistic and cultural, proficiency. Part of the minor requirements may be taken abroad.

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Recognizing the critical role that law plays in societies, the minor in legal studies provides students with courses that deepen and expand their understanding of law as practiced, especially its influence on social, political, and economic institutions.

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The management information systems minor is designed for students who wish to learn about computer-based information systems and how they are used in today's businesses. The minor enhances the career options of students in any major and increases their capacity to analyze, design, and manage business processes related to their program of study.

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The management minor provides a solid introduction to the world of general business management.

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Marketing, sales, and customer-oriented aspects of the marketing minor broaden students' learning experiences and professional opportunities by creating a secondary focus in marketing.

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The mathematics minor is designed for students who want to learn new skills and develop new ways of framing and solving problems. It offers students the opportunity to explore connections among mathematical ideas and to further develop mathematical ways of thinking.

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The minor in mechanical engineering exposes students to the core foundations of the discipline. Courses help non-majors explore high-technology careers and communicate more effectively with engineers on project teams. The minor consists of a five-course sequence that builds on prerequisite knowledge from calculus and engineering mechanics. Elective courses provide additional depth of knowledge in an area of individual student interest.

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The media arts and technology minor provides students with a five-course sampling of the media arts and technology major. Most students begin with the Design Production (MAAT-383) course and customize their selection of courses from diverse offerings related to media production, media architecture, media strategy, and media management.

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The microelectronic engineering minor provides basic integrated circuit fabrication skills to students from science and other engineering related disciplines whose career path may involve the semiconductor industry. RIT has one of the finest cleanrooms in the world specializing in undergraduate microelectronic education. This minor enables students to utilize these state-of-the-art facilities while they develop the skills they need for success in the industry. 

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The minor in military studies and leadership provides students the opportunity to learn about military officer training and its mission to develop leaders for tomorrow’s Armed Forces. Courses promote leadership and management, skills that can be employed in any career field, along with courses analyzing the military’s role in national security affairs and foreign policy. Students choose the Air Force track or the Army track.

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The minor in mobile design and development provides non-computing majors with a firm foundation in designing applications for mobile devices. There is an explosion in the types and amount of mobile devices and this minor is designed to provide students with the ability to design and implement cross-platform applications.

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The minor in mobile development provides students enrolled in computing degree programs with experience designing and creating compelling native applications for mobile devices. Smartphones are outselling desktop computers. New mobile devices of varying sizes, types, and uses are being created everyday for both businesses and personal use and contexts. Developers are needed to create applications for these needs that perform well on the major mobile platforms.

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad.

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad.

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad. 

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad. 

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad.

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad. 

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad. 

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad. 

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This minor provides two full years of modern language and culture instruction to prepare students for living and working within an intercultural society both at home and abroad. The minor consists of five courses, either five language courses or a combination of language courses with up to two culture courses. Students with previous language skills must consult the minor adviser for placement evaluation before they register. Part of the requirements for this minor can be fulfilled by courses taken abroad. 

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The museum studies minor provides students with a foundation in the history and practice of the museum as an institution and in the history, theory, and practice of collecting, exhibiting, and preserving the cultural heritage that defines the purpose and function of the museum. Courses cover a wide range of topics that are relevant to contemporary museology: the history of museums and collecting, the technical study of art and materials, the history and theory of exhibitions, interactive design, public history, the rise of the museum profession, legal and ethical concerns, and conservation.

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The music and technology minor includes courses in music theory, music history, contemporary and historical musical instrument technology, acoustics, audio engineering, music for media, and music performance. This minor provides students with an avenue to integrate their technological interests and skills with music.

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The music performance minor combines courses in music theory, music history, and world music with practical application through ensemble participation and applied music study. This combination of the academic and the practical offers students a more profound understanding of the art of music, and in a broader sense, an introduction to cultural development and the communication of ideas. A total of 15 credit hours from the suggested list of courses must be earned for the minor, with three credits in music theory and three credits from ensemble participation, required. Students can substitute 3 credits of Applied Music for three credits of ensemble, upon approval from Performing and Visual Arts department.

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This minor provides computing students with a firm foundation in networking and/or systems administration. Computer networks and the systems attached to these networks have become ubiquitous. Therefore, knowledge of how computer networks function, their administration, and the administration of the systems attached to them can be of value to every computing professional since their work is impacted in some way by computer networks and computer systems. Students may choose between two tracks: networking or system administration.

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The nutritional sciences minor enhances a student’s major with a focus on nutrients and human nutrition issues. The study of nutrients includes knowledge about their sources, metabolism, and relationship to health. Nutritional status impacts medicine, health care policy and promotion, global relationships, issues in anthropology and sociology, exercise science, food systems, hospitality, and behavioral health.

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Optical science techniques are used in a variety of consumer products (digital cameras, CD players), communication technologies (optical fibers), medical imaging (infrared imaging), and the sciences (surveillance, remote sensing, astronomical systems). This minor can be an important complement to studies in electrical and microelectronic engineering, the biological sciences, physics, chemistry, mathematics, technical photography, and various majors in the field of applied science and technology.

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The packaging science minor offers courses covering a broad range of packaging activities, including development/design, testing, marketing, and production. Related legal, economic, and environmental/sustainability concerns are also addressed. Students from majors such as engineering, engineering technology, multidisciplinary studies, management, marketing, international business, industrial design, and print media could all benefit from the packaging science minor.

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The philosophy minor provides students with the critical skill of philosophical analysis while they take courses on a wide variety of issues central to everyone’s existence. Students get a solid grasp of the major philosophers, movements, and topics of philosophical debate that continue to shape our lives and how we act. 

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The photography minor explores the diverse subject of photography from either an art or science perspective. Students develop both technical and aesthetic skills needed for creative, communication, or scientific applications. Students choose one of the following areas of emphasis: general photography, fine art photography, photojournalism, or photo sciences. Course selections are based upon career goals and aspirations, personal interests, and the availability of photography courses. Courses for the minor are selected from the School of Photographic Arts and Sciences’s comprehensive portfolio of offerings in photographic sciences, photojournalism, applied photography, and fine art photography.

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In a broad sense, the aim of physics as a discipline is to develop interconnected unifying threads bridging the vast number of seemingly diverse phenomena observed in the physical world around us. The minor provided students with the opportunity for additional study in physics in order to build a secondary area of expertise in support of their major or other areas of interest.

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The political science minor emphasizes the interdependence of domestic politics and international relations in the age of globalization. The minor brings together components of American politics, international relations, and comparative politics to provide students with both national and global perspectives on politics. Perhaps most important, the political science minor seeks to help students make sense of the increasingly complicated political environment that confronts them in their role as citizens. 

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The minor in psychology provides the opportunity for students to take courses comprising the study of behavior. Students may select from among a variety of courses, which enables students to customize their minor while getting wide exposure to important concepts, issues, methods, and theories in psychology. 

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The public policy minor provides students with a foundation in the field of public policy and allows them to make connections between public policy and other fields of study. The minor underscores the role of public policy on science and technology-based problems. Students obtain a deeper understanding of public policy and the policy making process, how policy analysis impacts policymaking, and how public policies operate within a number of specific science or technological domains. 

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This minor integrates the studies of human society, science, and technology in their social content and context. The minor bridges the humanities and social sciences to provide better understanding of the ways in which science, technology, and society are mutually interacting forces in our world. Students learn how to analyze the social institutions, the built environment, and their role in creating them. This minor enhances a student’s ability to contribute to the development of science and technology in ways that are historically, culturally, and ethically informed.

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Students in disciplines with a heavy reliance on software applications may be interested in pursuing a minor in software engineering. The minor provides a broad view of the software engineering landscape including introductory material and fundamentals in design and process. Students deepen their software design skills and learn techniques for working on a productive software engineering team by choosing electives in design or process to gain a deeper understanding of one of these areas, or they may choose to balance their courses for a broad view of both topics.

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The structural design minor creates a focus on the different types of structures and materials used in design. It also introduces related design codes. The minor is designed to accommodate students majoring in mechanical engineering technology or mechanical engineering.

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The supply chain management minor provides students with the knowledge to assist in developing and implementing efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses and suppliers, to deliver products and services–from raw materials to customer delivery. The minor provides a background in areas commonly needed to support supply chain management, including business strategy, information systems, lean/quality management, customer service, purchasing, negotiations, contracts, forecasting, inventory management, logistics, and project management. Completion of this minor provides students with Lean Six-Sigma Yellow Belt body of knowledge.

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This multidisciplinary minor is for students interested in exploring issues associated with developing and delivering sustainable product systems. Courses enhance the understanding of the three dimensions of sustainability (economic, ethical, and environmental), develop awareness of the need for more sustainable approaches to product development, and explore strategies for developing and delivering sustainable product systems.

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The theatre arts minor provides an iterative balance of theory and practice that engages students intellectually and creatively. This combination of critical thinking and experiential learning offers students an in-depth understanding of the art of theater, as well as an introduction to the role of theater as both a form of commentary on, and as a reflection of, society and culture. The minor includes student participation in a minimum of three department sponsored theater productions via Theater Ensemble (FNRT-230) and Dramatic Theory and Text Analysis (FNRT-207).

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Visual culture explores the role of visual media in everyday life and its critical function in the dissemination of ideas in the public sphere. Emphasizing comparative critical approaches to the convergence of art, popular media, science, and technology, the minor engages globalized visual media ranging from photography, television and film, to new media (the web, digital imaging, and social networks), architecture, design, and art (painting, sculpture, and multimedia forms) in the context of such social arenas, as art, news, science, advertising, and popular culture.

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The water resources minor broadens the learning experiences and professional opportunities of students in technical disciplines who have an interest in courses related to water treatment, wastewater treatment, hydrology, the environment and society.

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The minor in web design and development is for non-computing majors and students outside the computing field who wish to learn more than just the basics of web usage. The minor features courses in web images, video, communication, development, and integration technologies. Students learn how to design and build websites, and create and manipulate digital images and video for the web. Students develop a broad range of skills and the understanding necessary to design and build a web presence.

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This minor provides students with a firm foundation in web development. The web has become a global, essential, and ubiquitous information delivery medium. Hence, knowledge of how the web works and how to effectively develop dynamic websites adds considerable value to computing majors. This minor provides foundational skills in web development, starting with simple sites, moving through dynamic client-side and server-side functionality, and culminating in web-based systems that create and access various information services.

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The women’s and gender studies minor provides a critical framework to explore the significance of gender—as it intersects with racial, ethnic, religious, national, class, sexuality, and disability-based identities, past and present. Course builds knowledge about the personal, social, cultural, economic, and historical dynamics that inform gender and intersecting social categories. The minor builds fluency with critical analysis and knowledge-building methods drawn from women's and gender studies, feminist theories, critical race studies, queer studies, social justice work, and activism. The minor also provides valuable skills and experience applying these different lenses to real-world interactions with diverse individuals and communities to current social challenges that impact multiple parties, and with an eye to improving equity and fair outcomes for everyone concerned. Students will learn how to analyze and question power relations in all their rich complexities, locally, and globally.

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Discontinued Minors

This minor has not been converted to semesters. However, a minor in history is now available.

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This minor was not converted to semesters. However, a minor in communication is available.

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Informatics studies the collection, storage, analysis, and presentation of digital information. Students analyze, integrate, and present information in ways that are meaningful to specific audiences. Skills developed in this minor include programming, statistical and other forms of data analysis, management and use of different types of data collections such as databases and XML files, and the application of mash-up tools to combine and present data in novel ways. The minor is for students outside the information technology major who wish to apply the tools of informatics to manage, process, and analyze data associated with their field of study or found in another domain.

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This minor was not converted to semesters. However, a minor in communication is available.

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Digital technologies are changing all aspects of how we read and analyze texts and how we access and conceptualize information. Through this minor, students read and analyze traditional texts produced in print, and non-traditional texts created specifically for online environments (e.g., electronic poetry, games, social media). This minor provides an entry point into investigating particular aspects of the digital and its relation to the literary. The minor examines the cultural and social impact of new technologies and offers students access to these technologies for application to new questions for study and new methods of creation.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters. However, a minor in history is now available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters.

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This minor was not converted to semesters.

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 This minor has not been converted to semesters. A minor in Modern Language-Arabic is available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters. A minor in Modern Language-Chinese is available.

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This minor was not coverted to semesters. A minor in Modern Language-German is available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters. A Modern Language-Italian minor is available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters. A minor in Modern Language-Japanese is available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters. A minor in Modern Language-Russian is available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters. A minor in Modern Language-Spanish is available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters. However, a minor in history is now available.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters.

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This minor focuses on the interplay between urban issues and urban policy. Every metropolitan area must address such enduring issues as poverty, housing, homelessness, transportation, education, crime, safety, recreation, and economic development. Each urban community must do so with an understanding of its unique social mix and neighborhood relations, and with recognition of its place in wider regional, national, and global networks. Students identify and analyze central issues and social problems of urbanization and explore and assess various ways decision-makers respond to these issues. This minor is closed to students majoring in sociology and anthropology who have chosen the urban studies track.

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This minor has not been converted to semesters.

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